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#661 zxb

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Posted 03 May 2003 - 04:40 PM

"BTW...for the record...Cricket, the only sport where you can watch the start of the match, go home, go out shopping, wash the car, do some work, have your lunch and go back to the match and STILL find nothing has happened since you left!!!"

I gather that you went to watch a match where rain stopped play then. ;)
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#662 Guest_piehunt_*

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Posted 03 May 2003 - 05:03 PM

"I gather that you went to watch a match where rain stopped play then."

You mean they stop the play for rain???

Whenever i've seen it on TV etc, the "players" just stand around rubbing there balls all day and paint there faces with bright yellow, orange, green lipstick. :D :)

ohhh and then around "tea-time" some guy walks onto the pitch with tea and crumpet and they all stop what they *wern't* doing in the first place!..all very quaint. ;)
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#663 traveller

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Posted 04 May 2003 - 12:51 PM

Dear Mr. P.
Of course this is the largest thread by far we are all interested in the sport not necessarily the outcome, contrary to the wars and other threads, which seem to occasion such vulgarity and scorn.
We have yanks, poms kiwis, ozzies, Indians pakis etc. visiting here. whould be in a shitfight discussing anything else!
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#664 Guest_piehunt_*

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Posted 04 May 2003 - 02:33 PM

Mr T,
I was kidding with you. I've kept up with this thread for a long time now, just never posted on it until now.

PS..i happen to like cricket, but i do prefer the one-day matches more. :)
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#665 traveller

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Posted 04 May 2003 - 03:30 PM

Had me fooled P;)
Love the one day game, more action than baseball, but even as a yank I appreciate the Tests.
BTW where"s Teeside?
Couldn't find it on a map!
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#666 traveller

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Posted 04 May 2003 - 03:35 PM

Is Waugh going to make em follow on? Try and bowl em out today and tomorrow am, then go in for a slog?
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#667 Guest_piehunt_*

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Posted 04 May 2003 - 03:37 PM

Traveller,
North-east of England..Middlesbrough to be precise. :)
From what i gather not to far from DWF...he's a "smogy" too!
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#668 traveller

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Posted 04 May 2003 - 03:46 PM

I've heard of geordies and scouses, but not smogies! Whence the name?
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#669 zxb

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Posted 04 May 2003 - 04:03 PM

Gillespies bowling seems slightly economic. 4 overs, all maidens. :)
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#670 Guest_piehunt_*

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Posted 04 May 2003 - 04:10 PM

Trav,
Teesside was and still is very big on chemical plants, lots of smoke stacks littering the sky-line, in the old days the sky could not be seen for smog, hence the name.

BTW..its no-where near as bad now. :)
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#671 traveller

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Posted 04 May 2003 - 04:15 PM

3 for 31 in the first innings wasn't so bad either.:cool:
Good evening to you Mr. z! I would have thought you and pie would be down at the pub, sinking a few schooners?
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#672 traveller

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Posted 04 May 2003 - 04:34 PM

Ah, but one thing does bug me aboput some of the inflexibility of Test play.
Had an innings break this morning, then resumed for 10 overs, then broke for lunch:confused:
Couldn't they have either delayed lunch or ad an early brunch?
I may have to take this up with the ICC:D
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#673 zxb

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Posted 05 May 2003 - 04:23 PM

Well, it looks as if a draw is the most likely outcome now. Or perhaps MacGill can make another 1st ball breakthrough as in the 2 previous sessions!
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#674 traveller

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Posted 05 May 2003 - 05:34 PM

Ox might not have to bat! McGill's 5-for:D
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#675 traveller

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Posted 05 May 2003 - 06:18 PM

How many balls to win?

3
4
5
6
:confused:
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#676 zxb

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Posted 05 May 2003 - 08:45 PM

15. Well at least the West Indians avoided an innings defeat. Just. And Lawsons hatrick. So I suppose it's not all bad for them. :confused:
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#677 Agnostic

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Posted 06 May 2003 - 12:59 PM

Odds for the next test::D
1. Windies lose by an innings and 100 runs - Even money.
2. Windies lose by ten wickets - 2 to 1.
3. Windies lose by more than five but less than 10 wickets - 3 to 1.
4. Windies win - 10 to 1.

Now I realize why rich Indian families send their kids to the land of Oz to learn about cricket. As a real-life son of a jailer, I can only say that you cant play cricket better than a convict.

The destruction was clinical. Andy Bichel alone is worth his weight in gold, and Waugh has a surfeit of riches from which to choose from. I watched Jimmy Maher on the boundary line on TV, chatting with Brett Lee, and having seen him play, I am sad to see him not play a test match. I wish they let him play for the next test. It is a wonder where all the Ozzie talent in cricket is coming from.

Some say that most of the West Indians now move over to the US to play basketball or baseball, and only the lesser guys get to play cricket.

But with an average age of 24, this West Indian team can only go uphill.
They cant possibly play worse than this.:D :D
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#678 zxb

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Posted 08 May 2003 - 01:08 PM

Remember that I was looking for a website that had scorecards of county matches once? Actually found one believe it or not.

www.cricket.org

That was the scorecard that I was looking for. For posterity. ;)
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#679 Agnostic

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Posted 08 May 2003 - 01:24 PM

He changed the game

Simon Barnes - 30 April 2003


Never has a cricketer had so appropriate a surname. But let us understand that aright. Steve Waugh's cricketing warfare has never been a matter of hatred, jingoism and senseless aggression, any more than a matter of chivalry, romance and the search for personal glory.

No. Waugh's wars have been about the most efficient possible means of despatching the enemy. They are about a clear understanding of the opposition's strengths and weaknesses, and an equally uncluttered understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of his own side. Sometimes the results are spectacular, but that is by the way. Spectacle is a by-product of a hard head, clear vision, an analytical mind and an impersonal lust for victory.

Waugh wants to defeat you personally - but nothing personal, if you see what I mean. He has that air possessed by very few, even at the highest level of sport: that sense of vocation, that urge to beat not the opposition but the limitations of your self, your game, your world. There was something of that unearthly quality in Ayrton Senna, the Brazilian racing driver. Ellen MacArthur, the British sailor, has it too.

Waugh has the gift of reducing complex matters to simple ones: he sees without prejudice how best to exploit the opposition's weakness, how best to deploy his own strengths. The approach, cold-blooded, scientific, is that of a general, rather than a character in Sir Thomas Malory.

Waugh has conducted his cricketing campaigns in a mood of dispassionate ferocity. He famously remarked that sledging was "mental disintegration"; but that is not so much the aim of Waugh's sledging as of Waugh's cricket. The batting, bowling and fielding of his teams have all had the aim of causing mental disintegration: a moment of uncertainty that leads to self-doubt that leads to defeat. Waugh always wants defeat to be personal and complete, the better to prey on the opposition mind.

And in the process, he has transformed Test cricket. Over the past four years, his Australians played in a manner that was once unthinkable. A captain is usually assessed on the way he operates his bowlers and sets his field, for it is supposed to be the fielding captain who controls the tempo of a match. Waugh is, of course, spectacularly good at all that. But it is the way he manages his batting line-up that is revolutionary.

In 1990, when there had been a long-running debate about intimidatory bowling, runs suddenly flowed in county cricket through a combination of flat pitches and a different type of ball. Simon Hughes, still operating as a bowler, asked the plaintive question: "What about intimidatory batting?" Under Waugh, Australia's batting has become the most intimidating aspect of modern cricket. The Australian batsmen seek to frighten opponents every bit as much as the fast-bowling quartet of the 1980s West Indians. They all act the same way, and they're all coming to get you.

Waugh's Australia bat with Waugh's dispassionate ferocity. They bat as a team, with personal glory very much a secondary matter. And above all, they bat fast. In 2001, Australia scored at 3.77 runs an over: breathtakingly fast by traditional standards. In 2002, Australia scored their Test runs at a rate of 3.99 an over. Only once in history has a team scored faster through a whole year - in 1910, Australia scored their runs at 4.47 every six balls, and there were far fewer Tests then. By comparison, England's run-rate in 2002 was 3.37 - and that was England's fastest rate in almost a century. Other nations are following the Australian lead, but they're not as good at it yet.

South Africa, once dour, now bat at a significantly faster tempo: the first thing they did in 2003 was to score 445 in a day against Pakistan. The sea-change in Michael Vaughan of England over the past year was in tempo. Speed is not an accident. It is a tactic. It can't be done without very good players, but it is not the direct result of having good players. It is the result of astute, logical, cold-blooded thought on the subject of how best to win a cricket match.

We traditionally think of fast scoring as something dashing and devil-may- care: Jessop, Milburn, Botham. It was merry and jaunty and beery, the way you batted if you were a bit of a lad. Fast scoring was not altogether serious - it came in the drive-for-show category. Waugh's Australians have put it into the putt-for-dough department. For them, fast scoring is not a bonnets-over-the-windmill slogfest: it is deadly serious. It is done first to undermine the opposing bowlers, and with them the rest of the fielding side. And then it gives Australia extra time in the quest for 20 wickets: a free session for your bowlers every innings. No wonder it took them only 11 playing days to win each of the last two Ashes series.

Most non-Australian cricket followers would admit when pressed that they can't always tell one Australian batsman from another. They all wear green helmets with the Australian coat of arms above the grille, they are all good, they are all vindictively aggressive towards anything loose, they are all hugely confident. They bat as a unit and there's always another one waiting to destroy you. A bit like the film Zulu.

The wicket-keeper scores even faster than the top six and the tail bat seriously, always an aspect of a consistently victorious side. And just as the West Indian bowling ground the opposition down, softened them up and destroyed their confidence, so the Australian batting does the same thing.

The influence of one-day cricket is obvious, but it is not that the Australians bat in Test matches as if they were in a one-dayer. It is rather that the thought processes of one-day cricket - the need to capitalise on every error of the opposition, the presumption that you look to make runs off every ball - have been adapted to the Test context.

Hit-and-giggle? Far from it. There is no suggestion that a wicket is any less valuable to an Australian than it was before: Sydney 2003 was the first time since England's previous visit four years earlier that they had been bowled out twice in a home Test. But wickets are seen more as team than as individual possessions. Every batting tactic, including that of speed, must be adapted to the conditions. In knuckling-down conditions, Australian batsmen will knuckle down. But send them a bad ball at any time in any context and hear it thwack into the boundary board: first over of the day, last over of the day, just after a wicket, just before tea, 50 for three or 200 for nought - bam. And don't even think about a night-watchman. When Andy Bichel was moved up to No. 3 at Sydney in January 2003, night-watchman was the word that sprang to some commentators' lips, but what he was actually doing was the opposite - softening the new ball.

It is not so much a tactic as an emphasis: when in doubt, attack. Not for fun - as a thought-out ploy. As a team policy. Speed is not self-indulgence but duty. The idea is to win every session of every Test match, and mostly that is what Australia have been doing. If things go amiss, there is always the captain to come in later in the order. The only disappointment in Waugh's later career is that there have been so few occasions when he has been required to do his one-man rescue act.

The tactic of speed has been enthralling, but Waugh did not do it to enthral. He did it to enslave. There was an awful lot of guff talked about "brighter cricket" in the 1960s: if that was brighter cricket, what would audiences of 40 years back have made of the Australian speed machine? Waugh doesn't employ the tactic to make cricket brighter. But - and it is an aspect of his greatness - he didn't allow his prejudice against mere entertainment to muddle his thinking. In its intention, the Australian stroke-making is as flamboyant as an atom bomb.

The definitive treatise on warfare as a science of destruction rather than a chivalric art was written by Karl von Clausewitz in Napoleonic times. It is called On War. If a similarly hard-nosed book were to be written on cricket, the same title could be used. With a small adjustment to the spelling.

Simon Barnes is chief sportswriter on The Times

? Wisden Almanack
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#680 traveller

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Posted 08 May 2003 - 02:11 PM

Great article Ag.

Tomorrow they start at St. John's. A notoriously small oval like Adelaide. Let's hope the Windies win the toss and bat first! I fear that when the Ozzies get in there will be another run-fest for sure.
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