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Interesting facts about Greece. Enjoy!


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#1 +Michail+

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Posted 26 August 2009 - 08:54 PM

I decided to put together a collection of facts regarding my country, Greece. This thread will be composed of several posts with various subjects. Some facts maybe redundant but i am sure you will like it.
So, check out some interesting and fun facts. Hope you enjoy:)
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Greece, the name only brings the thought of historical sites and people in robes in mind. One of the most popular tourist destinations in Europe, the country is visited by a large number of tourists every year. It is the place where pristine beaches mesmerize you with azure waters and serene surroundings, the place where archaeological and historical sites transform you to a different time altogether.

Nature has endowed Greece with bewitching beauty, mainly in the form of picturesque islands. These islands lure tourists to forget the grinding tensions of daily life and rejuvenate their body as well as soul.


Interesting Facts about Greece
  • The official name of Greece is the Hellenic Republic.
  • Athens is the capital of Greece. It is also the most populated city in the country.
  • Ancient Greek civilization comprised of Southern Italy, the coastal areas of Turkey and the Black Sea, along with some colonies in North Africa, Southern France and Spain. Modern Greece is just a part of it.
  • 80 percent landscape of Greece comprises of mountains. Only one half of the country is covered by forests, the other half is barren.
  • There are about 3000 islands in Greece. However, only a few hundred of them are inhabited.
  • Greece boasts of having 7,000 (limestone) caves, which form 24,000 km of underground galleries.
  • Mount Olympus is the highest mountain in Greece, with a height of 2,919m. It is believed to have served as the home of the Gods in the ancient Greek religion.
  • As per 2007 UNICEF report, Greece had the lowest percentage of teenagers smoking cigarettes (or cannabis) or living in a step family structure.
  • WHO 2002 stats state that Greek men and women have the highest incidence of obesity in Europe.
  • The renowned Belgian pralines Leonidas have been named after the 5th century BC King of Sparta, who was homonymous.
  • Greece spreads over an area of somewhere around 51,000 square miles, with the length of its coastline being 9,300 miles.
  • There are as many as 63 different folk dances in Greece.
  • The popular yo-yo toy, the second oldest known toy in the world, originated in the days of ancient Greece, around 3,000 years ago.
  • Traditionally, Greeks have been known to celebrate their name days, rather than their birth dates.
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Greece has an area of 131,940 sq. km., which makes it about the size of Alabama — just slightly smaller.
98% of the population speak Greek. The rest 2% speak other languages.
The per capita income is $30,600 (as of 2008; U.S.A.: $45,800).
The infant mortality is 5.25 deaths per 1000 live births (2008 est.; U.S.A.: 6.3 deaths/1000 live births).
The life expectancy is 79.52 years (male: 76.98, female: 82.21) (2008 est.; U.S.A.: 78.14, m: 75.29, f: 81.13).
The literacy is 96% (male: 97.8%, female: 94.2%) (2001 census; U.S.A.: 99%, 2003 est.).
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#2 +Michail+

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Posted 26 August 2009 - 09:36 PM

Lets start from the big picture, the continents. Greece is in Europe. Europe looks really small there, wait to see how small is Greece :)

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Here is a more detailed world Map. You can actually see the word GREECE better than the country itself in the Middle of the Map, and above the biiiig Africa.

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Lets get serious now and lets see Greece finally in a decent size:) This is Europe.
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And another one, similar, notice Moscow in the upper right corner.
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Lets see Greece in relation with the Middle East and Africa, i like this map:)
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And a more modern map...where you can barely see Greece on the left BUT please note that the Georgian borders are not exactly these any more:Bad:

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Regional map of the Balkans
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And another
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Map of Greece

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And last, here are some other maps just in case :)

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#3 +Michail+

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Posted 27 August 2009 - 12:44 AM

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The Greek Flag
The origins of today's national flag with its cross-and-stripe pattern are a matter of debate. Every part of it, including the blue and white colours, the cross, as well as the stripe arrangement can be connected to very old historical elements; however it is difficult to establish "continuity", especially as there is no record of the exact reasoning behind its official adoption in early 1822.

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The design, symbols and pattern of the Flag

The stripes represent the number of the syllables in the phrase: Ελευθερια η Θανατος (Freedom or Death). [Others claim that the stripes reflect the number of letters in the Greek word for Freedom -Ελευθερια]

Freedom or Death was the motto during the years of the Hellenic Revolution against the Ottoman Empire in the 19nth century . This word-freedom- stirred the heart of the oppressed Greeks, it created intense emotions and inspired them to fight and gain their freedom after 400 years of slavery.

The striped pattern was chosen because of its similarity with the wavy sea that surrounds the shores of Greece. The interchange of blue and white colors makes the Greek Flag on a windy day to look like the Aegean Pelagos (sea). Only the quaint islands are missing! The Hellenic Square Cross that rests on the upper left-side of the flag and occupies one fourth of the total area demonstrates the respect and the devotion the Hellenic people have for the Greek Orthodox Church and signifies the important role of Christianity in the formation of the modern Hellenic Nation.

During the dark years of the Ottoman rule, the Greek Orthodox Church helped the enslaved Greeks to retain their cultural characteristics: the Hellenic language, the Byzantine religion and generally the Hellenic ethnic identity, by the institution of the Crypha Scholia (secret schools). The Crypha Scholia were a web of schools that operated secretly throughout Greece and were committed in transmitting to Greeks the wonders of their ancestors and the rest of their cultural heritage. Today, Christianity is still the dominant religion among Greeks. Therefore, the significance of the Cross is justified.

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The colors of the Flag
Blue and White. These two colors symbolize the blue of the Hellenic Sea and the Whiteness of its restless waves! According to the mythic legends, the Goddess of Beauty and Love, Aphrodite (Venus) emerged from these waves. In addition, it reflects the blue of the Hellenic Sky and the White of the few clouds in it.

OTHER GREEK FLAGS


Hellenic Army war flag
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Greek Navy Flag
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Greek Orthodox Church Flag (From Byzantine times)
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Byzantine Army Flag
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Byzantine Navy Flag
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Flag of Byzantine Empire

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Imperial Flags of Byzantium
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#4 +Michail+

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Posted 29 August 2009 - 06:50 PM

Greek Alphabet

The Greeks were the first people to create an alphabet with vowels. In the Greek alphabet each letter had a sound.
The Greeks used this alphabet to write down the history of Greece, poetry, stories, and plays.

The Greek Alphabet


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Greek Alphabet

The Greek alphabet is an alphabet that has been used to write the Greek language since about the 9th century BC. It was the first true alphabet, that is, an alphabet with a symbol for each vowel and consonant, and is the oldest alphabetic script in use today. Besides writing modern Greek, today its letters are used as mathematical symbols, particle names in physics, as names of stars, in the names of fraternities and sororities, in the naming of supernumerary tropical cyclones, and for other purposes. The Greek alphabet gave rise to the Gothic, Glagolitic, Cyrillic, Coptic, and possibly the Armenian alphabets, as well as the Latin alphabet.


Many modern, scientific and technical words in English and other Western languages are derived from Greek, and it has been estimated that 12% of the English vocabulary is of Greek origin.

Greek words used in English language, some of them you can find below: Press a letter
+A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z




Ancient Greek Number Codes

Ancient Greek had no cyphers (characters 0-9) as we have today. Instead, the alphabet itself was made to serve a dual purpose. Thus a given character had its corresponding number. For example, the Alpha character also stood for the number 1. The following is a list of the numbers and their corresponding characters:


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Greek words commonly used in the English language


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#5 +Michail+

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Posted 31 August 2009 - 11:00 AM

Greeks drink coffee in two ways:

-The first and more traditional comes from the early Constantinople times and it is called Greek Coffee.

-The second and more recent type of Greek coffee is served ice-cold and is made by a special type of coffee, which comes as powder or as small grains. This type is served during the summer and has started to spread around Europe and the American continent carrying the name invented in Greece by French tourists: "Frappe"!

The moment of drinking the coffee is without any exaggeration, a holy moment for all Greeks!

Greek coffee (The traditional)

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No Greek village is complete without a traditional coffee shop, the "kafenio" Its the most important place in the village, the central point of communication, a place to meet friends, to play "Tavli" the Greek version of Backgammon or just pass time by drinking a Greek coffee, tea, fresh juice or a home-made fruit squash. Greek coffee is ordered "sketo"- no sugar, "metrio" equal portions of coffee and sugar or "gliko" more sugar than coffee.

Each "kafenio" has its own individual way of making coffee, so be to be sure of what you will receive, it is best to state the number of sugars you want whilst ordering!

In case you are invited to someone's house to drink a coffee, don't be surprised if they turn their cups upside down onto the saucer after drinking the coffee. There are some people that say they can read your future from the coffee drains.

Don't be afraid to let them do it... it is not magic it is just culture. It's a nice way to start some small talk, and of course it depends on you how seriously you take the predictions!


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In olden days you had little Cafeneions everywhere which were the domain of men only, where the men would while away the hours, slowly sipping their Greek coffee, whilst contemplating life, singing along to the music playing or having a game of tavli (backgammon).
The women would find a break in their daily routines to meet with friends or a neighbour and savour a coffee whilst catching up on the local gossip.
Although these stereo typical ways have been replaced with modern people and Cafes in Greece, the excuse to stop time whilst slowly enjoying a coffee has not diminished.
As with many things in Greece there is an elaborate performance to preparing a Greek coffee, one which is never rushed, nothing missed and very precise. I feel the almost ritual-like preparation only enhances the anticipation of a special moment.
Greek coffee is made in a small coffee pot - normally copper or brass, with a long handle, which is called a briki.
The difference to instant coffee is that you put all the ingredients in the pot and brew it together.
Greeks are so particular about making their coffee they will actually buy a little gas single burner (like the one used in camping) just to have to use for their coffee. This is because most households in Greece cook on electric stoves and electric cannot be regulated like gas to control the heat to enhance the frothy foam that forms on the top of the coffee as it brews. All my family and friends I know in Greece use this method to make their coffee. But please do not be put off if you only have electric.

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They say the Greek coffee pleases all your senses!

First your eyes, the look of it.
the touch, touching the cup.
the smell, the aroma of the coffee
the sound, as you sip it - the Greeks sip it loudly!
the taste, superb!
No wonder it is so special.

The average Greek will drink 2-3 coffees a day.
It is always served in a small (espresso size) white Greek coffee cup with matching saucer, along with a glass of iced water.
It is sediment based. Once you have drunk the coffee - the sediments are left at the bottom of the cup.
Many women have tried their hand at fortune telling. You place the cup upside down over the saucer for the sediment to dry out and from whatever pattern forms - your fortune is foretold!
PROPORTIONS FOR GREEK COFFEE
It is best not to make more than 2 coffees at one time or else you will lose the froth on the top that so many love and it won't produce the best results.
If you do not have a briki, you can use a small saucepan.

Into the briki add one Greek coffee cup of water per person.
Add one teaspoon of Greek coffee per cup.
Also add the sugar depending on sweetness required.
Medium - metrio is 1/2 to 1 teaspoon sugar,
Sweet - glyco is 1 1/2 to 2 teaspoon sugar,
None - sketo has no sugar and can be very strong. I would recommend if you have never tasted greek coffee before to have at least 1 teaspoon of sugar as it is very strong, and then adjust to your preference. I never have sugar in my instant coffee or even capuccino's yet I do like my Greek coffee sweet and strong.
Place the briki or saucepan over the heat, stir well until the sugar and coffee are diluted.
When the Greek coffee comes to the boil, it forms a ring of foam, starting from the outer rim and as it boils the rim closes and the coffee rises.
You need to take the coffee off the heat just before the ring is fully closed - that is if you like your coffee strong and heavy.
If you let the ring close and rise more, the coffee will become weaker.
The whole difference between strong and weak coffee is about 1 second as it starts to rise, so you have to be quick.
Pour it immediately amongst the prepared cups and serve along with a glass of iced water.


READING GREEK COFFEE: A cup of your lifeHow can a cup of coffee tell you about the past, present and future in your personal, social or professional life, sceptics will ask. This method of fortune-telling, known as tasseography, or tasseomancy (kafemandeia in Greek), has been practised for centuries and originates in China, where tea leaves were read in the bell-shaped cups (before that, monks used to read patterns formed on the internal part of bells in temples, so the handle-less tea cup was a logical progression). The author of the above-mentioned book, who uses the pen-name "Sophia" (which also means wisdom in Greek) writes that she was taught coffee-reading by her grandfather, who did it professionally. It is her theory that each individual's DNA and thus the emotional, mental and physical condition of each affects what shapes will be formed in the grains. Some images will simply reveal something we are already aware of, consciously or subconsciously, whilst other symbols are said to foretell events beyond our knowledge or expectations.

Today, people around the world continue to look for answers in the residue of their tea or coffee and lessons in how to do it correctly are passed on through the generations. It goes with the dramatic Greek nature to be both curious (and often anxious) about the present and future, as well as to enjoy making Cassandra-like predictions about how events or situations will unfold. The trick is not to take it all too seriously, but also to consider the possibility that some, if not most of it may be likely, indicative of something important or de facto true; certainly everyone who has had their cup read comments that what it reveals often is uncannily spot-on. Try it and see for yourself:
Step one
Ideal for reading are African, Greek or Turkish ground coffees, rich in taste as well as consistency (not to mention caffeine levels - tell me about it!). The drink should be brewed in the traditional long-handled briki and served in the suitable small cup. Whether there's a particular issue one requires some enlightenment on or not doesn't matter, for the coffee will always have something to reveal. If one wants answers to a specific question, this concern should be focused on whilst sipping at a leisurely pace. Overall, it's important to enjoy the experience and keep an open mind.
Step two
Once the coffee is finished, the cup should be held facing out on its side and be turned three times clock-wise, whilst spilling out the sludge and simultaneously spreading it around the entire surface of the cup. Whatever excess remains should be poured out from the side where the cup-handle is. The cup should then be overturned onto a napkin and left for a few minutes. Take this moment to take a deep breath and ask for guidance in reading your cup; who or what you ask about is completely up to you.
Step three
Overturn your cup and hold it upright. Remember to keep an open mind and not try too hard to see things. Also, try to put your scepticism aside. If you see something that looks like one particular symbol but not exactly, you're probably right. How you interpret things is up to you. What looks like a smudged cow to you may be a clear dog to someone else - asking for a second opinion is a good option if you're not sure. Often, the most important messages appear surprisingly clearly.
Types of symbols
Animals, initials, natural landmarks such as rivers, lakes or trees and many other things known to the human eye - from a fork to a golf club to a moon - can all be found in the cup.
important guidelines!
Generally, the bottom part of the cup represents people, situations, or ideas from your past, the middle part on the sides of the cup represents the present whilst the top part indicates what's approaching in the future. Where a symbol appears on the cup can create different meanings.

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Frappe Coffee (The modern Greek coffee)

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They say that Greece is the Frappe Nation and since this is the truth I couldn't disagree with that notion myself...
The location of the frappe moment can be as public as a 200-seat cafe in Athens or as private as the two-room apartment three flights directly above it. Its perspective can be as sweeping, spectacular and sunny as a terrace set in the coastal cliffs of Santorini or as confined and gloomy as a windowless coffee canteen in the recesses of a Thessaloniki warehouse building. The apparatus that sets it in motion can be as elaborate as a programmable, multi-speed, steal-bladed, high-torque blender or as basic as an old lidded jar working in tandem with the free hand that shakes it.

Drinking frappe is something like a tradition in Greece, an everyday act to wake up, to get some energy, to start the day, to relax, to discuss. there is always a reason to drink frappe. You will see Greek people sitting in coffee houses for hours under the sun or inside if there is cold, relaxing, looking around, smoking and talking about everything. This can go on all day. there's no greater pleasure than those precious moments, sitting at a cafι and enjoying a glass of cold frappe...

If you are not in Greece don't get disappointed! The following are the basic instructions and ingredients to help you make a frappe on your own. So if you are not in Greece you can act like you are. Enjoy!


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INGREDIENTS:
2 teaspoons instant coffee
2 teaspoons granulated sugar
Cold water
30 ml evaporated milk or regular milk optional





Preparation:
Place the coffee, sugar to taste, and 60ml cold water in a shaker, jar or drink mixer. Cover and shake well for 30 seconds or, if using a standing or hand-held drink mixer, process 10 seconds to produce a thick, light-brown foam.
Place a few ice cubes in a tall glass. Slowly pour all of the coffee foam into the glass. Add milk, if desired, according to taste. Fill with cold water until the foam reaches the top of the glass. Server with a thin, bendable straw and glass of cold water on the side.
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#6 eleni

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Posted 02 September 2009 - 01:40 PM

Very nice, thank you, Michail!

ICXC NIKA
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#7 +Michail+

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Posted 02 September 2009 - 09:49 PM

Very nice, thank you, Michail!

ICXC NIKA


You are welcome Eleni. If you would like a specific subject about Greece let me know. I plan to add many Hellenic topics here gradually.
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#8 +Michail+

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Posted 18 September 2009 - 10:10 AM

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When we use the term ancient Greece we refer to the periods of Greek history in Classical Antiquity, lasting from 750 BC (the archaic period) to 146 BC (the Roman conquest). It is generally considered to be the seminal culture which provided the foundation of Western Civilization. The Greek culture had a powerful influence on the Roman Empire, which carried a version of it to many parts of Europe.

The civilization of the ancient Greeks has been immensely influential on the language, politics, educational systems, philosophy, science and arts, giving rise to the Renaissance in Western Europe and again resurgent during various neo-Classical revivals in 18th and 19th century Europe and the Americas.

In this part of this site you will come in contact with Ancient Greece and learn a few more interesting things about it and specific domains regarding the everyday life of ancient Greeks. So, here you will get an idea of the ancient sports practiced in ancient Greece, ancient Greek recipes, ancient jewellery worn by women of the time and other details that will give you an overview of how the ancient Greeks used to think and live their everyday lives. Another section is dedicated to the twelve gods and goddesses of Mount Olympus such us Zeus, Hera, Apollo and Aphrodite and their attributes, character traits and life as the ancient Greeks used to think of them. And if you want to feel like an ancient Greek, choose a recipe that you like, buy the ingredients and have a meal accompanied with wine. Wearing a tunic is not mandatory...


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The Greek Gods and Goddesses of the ancient times were also known as the twelve gods of Olympus and the religion based on their worship was called Dodekatheon. The Greek religion wanted the principal gods of the Greek pantheon residing on top of Mount Olympus.

Posted Image Ancient Greek Golden Jewellery

The first jewellery that man ever wore are lost in the depth of pre-historical times and it is impossible to trace them. So, research hasn't yet showed if jewellery use preceded the use of clothes or the opposite.

Posted Image Sex in Ancient Greece

Sexual intercourse was an essential part of the symposiums in ancient Greece and that becomes obvious if we just take a look at the vases and jugs used during these feasts and which were decorated with scenes presenting men and women consummating, bestiality, homosexuality, masturbation and so on...
Posted Image Delphic Oracle

Delphi is a world-known archaeological site in Greece. During the ancient times all the important people were visiting the temple of Apollo to find out what was going to happen in the future. The remains of the temple and the area surrounding Delphi, or the centre of the earth as it is still known, are visited by millions of people every year. Here, you will find beautiful pictures of the site and its museum.

Posted Image Greek Philosophers

[FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Greece has marveled, as it is known, in the sector of philosophy and the ideas researched and presented by the famous Greek philosophers are admired by many people and have been adopted in our everyday lives. People like Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Pythagoras, Heracletus, Demokritos, Plutarch and so many other ancient Greek philosophers have played an important role on acquiring today
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#9 +Michail+

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Posted 18 September 2009 - 10:26 PM

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This is a very interesting work on Atlantis and credit and special thanks should be given to the author for his good effort as per below.

Special Note: I know this is not the way to start a conversation, but I want to draw everyone's attention to one fact: I have worked very hard to put this site together. I bet it is easy for you to copy and paste and never give credit for what you take, given that you can find some of the information online if you search hard for it. But as I said, I serve you everything on a tray, so please be nice and ask me before copying and pasting and taking credit for it. Next, the information which I am gathering on Mesopotamia, my interpretation of Plato, and some other similar issues cannot be found in books or on the Internet, therefore they are copyright materials; they belong to me. I will hunt down those that steal them. I am serious, because I have found a case and I am not working so others can take credit for and advantage of my hard work.


Now back to Atlantis:
I have built "Lost Continent of Atlantis: Myth or Reality?" with the purpose of bringing together news, discoveries, and theories related to the lost continent of Atlantis. Some people look for the the lost city of Atlantis, which in Plato's view, is only part of the Atlantean empire. However, we will discuss this issue in due time.
We will also try to understand if there is indeed something like 'the lost continent of Atlantis' or just a 'lost Atlantis'.
I thought my job would be easy, since I only had to update my old Atlantis site. However, things turned out differently. I did extensive research, I learnt what frustration meant when I could not find enough information to support my theories. As a matter of fact, my site is still under-construction, because I have heaps of documents and data to arrange. Probably, "Atlantis" will be constantly updated, until it will reach the perfection I want it to reach; until I will have laid all my cards on the table.
I thought nothing could change my views, because they were so strong. Yet I was wrong. I tried to gather everything and keep an open mind, so I read any article supporting or denying the existence of the lost continent of Atlantis.
I cannot draw a conclusion at the moment; it is simply a collection of ideas and theories that need further research. But if you ask me whether Atlantis is myth or fact, or "Did Atlantis exist?", I know my answer. Atlantis is not a story as some people think, but reality. However, I will let you cast your vote, for I am not restraining any information. Any theory is welcome.
For those who have heard of Edgar Cayce, I need to say that I did not use any of his books, or articles, or stories, and none of my theories are based on his ideas. However, if similarities occur here and there (similarities I would know about after carefully investigating lots of web sites dedicated to the lost continent of Atlantis) it is because I have reached the same conclusion, not because I tried to fit his prophecies into my work. God forbid, I do not intend to base my research on prophecies. In other words, I used as much relevant archeological, geological, and astronomical data as I could, without too much fuss and guessing. On the other hand, you cannot have a theory without some guesses, which, at the right time, will prove right or wrong.
Right. Enough rambling for now.
If you want to know first what every chapter is about, read on. For help later on, check the "Contents" page.

A short description of every chapter:

News: Latest News in the Scientific World
Presenting new discoveries and new theories found in magazines and newspapers, related more or less to the lost 'continent' of Atlantis or its fate.

Chapter 1: Which "Atlantis" are we looking for?
So, what is Atlantis? And, more importantly, where is Atlantis?
Explaining the difference between the mythical Atlantis and the real Atlantis. Yes, this might answer your question: is Atlantis a fact or is Atlantis a myth? Is there such a thing as the "lost continent of Atlantis"? Also, we already try to identify the answer to the question: "where was Atlantis if it did exist?".

Chapter 2: About the Circle of Evolution on Earth
The Mayan circle of evolution and how ancient civilizations grew and decayed.

Chapter 3: Ancient Maps and Writings on Atlantis
Examining Plato ('The Dialogues': 'Timaeus' and 'Critias'), Solon, Plutarch, Herodotus, Aelian, the Maya's and Aztec's ancient texts ('Chilam Balam', 'Dresden Codex', 'Popol Vuh', 'Codex Chimalpopoca'), the Frysian 'Oera Linda Book', the Bible's 'Genesis', the Chaldean stories, and the Mesopotamian legends.
Presenting and examining the maps of Piri Reis, Ptolemy, and Athanasius Kircher.
Also I have gathered some accounts on the myth of flood. I am already convinced that Atlantis can be found in myths and religion.

Chapter 4: Calamities
Calamities (tsunamis, earthquakes, floods, volcanoes) that wiped out cities and lands. I focus on volcano activities and earthquakes, especially the way they work and how they can affect our planet.

Chapter 5: Can Lands Sink and Rise?
Islands rise and sink as a result of volcanic activity or earthquakes, or due to the rise and fall in the earth's crust. I have prepared for you lots of true accounts. First, I give examples of huge disasters that hit mankind (maybe in the same way in which Atlantis was hit), then I show the sunken lands that rose out of nowhere and fell back in.
I am also using some information found in Ignatius Donnelly's book, "Atlantis, the Antediluvian World".

Chapter 6: Are the Ancient Texts Just Stories?
On the other hand, there are people who think Plato's Dialogues was a myth. What do they have to say? And what do I have to say? Who's right? Presenting theories based on the old history of Greece and other ancient civilizations. Trying to make connections between ancient texts. Was there indeed a Golden Age?

Chapter 7: The Search for the Lost Continent of Atlantis, Underwater
This is a complex chapter. It mentions all the underwater structures and discoveries that took place until 1997: the Bahamas and Bimini quests of Valentine, Dr Zink, Dr. Schliemann, etc., and the structures found in other areas of the world, like Spain, Portugal, Florida.
What have the scientists really have to say about these discoveries?

Chapter 8: Mysteries on the Shore
Continuing from Chapter 7, but with discoveries on shore. Also a debate over the Dogons' knowledge of Sirius.

Chapter 9: The Nowadays Search for Atlantis
What is going on today in the world and how is the search for the lost continent of Atlantis coming along? Mentioning the expeditions in Spain, Bolivia, Gibraltar, Cornwall (UK), Bahamas, India, Cyprus, Spain, and Ireland.

Chapter 10: Interpretation of Plato's Work
Using the text, I analyze the possible location as implied by Plato. Also I compare Plato with Herodotus's description of Egypt. Then I try to search for Atlantis in other possible locations, like the Red Sea, the North Africa, or Mesopotamia. I dived a little in Herodotus's "History" as well. (some of it is still being researched)

Chapter 11: Lost Continent of Atlantis - Location Theories Part I
Mentioning the theories that claim Antarctica and Santorini (Thera) to be the location for 'the lost continent' of Atlantis.

Chapter 12: Lost Continent of Atlantis - Location Theories Part II
Mentioning the theories that claim South America (Bolivia) and the Azores to be the location for the 'lost continent' of Atlantis.

Chapter 13: Lost Continent of Atlantis - Location Theories Part III
Mentioning the theory that claims East Indies (Indonesia and India) and Cyprus to be the location for the 'lost continent' of Atlantis.

Chapter 14: Lost Continent of Atlantis - Is it Mesopotamia?
Investigating the ancient cultures of Mesopotamia - Sumer, Babylonia, Assyria, etc. Is there any relation between Mesopotamia and Atlantis? Could one of these civilizations be the inspiration for Plato's work and for the Egyptian stories?
(February 2007 - work in progress)

Soon to Come:
* On Piri Reis and His Map
* Update and reconstruction of the site "Mysteries of Old Civilizations"

So far, humanity had dreams of finding 'ancient myths', such as Troy, Helike, Pompeii. It unfolded pages of ancient history it had never dreamt of revealing. Therefore, I am also that kind of a dreamer, hoping one day to find Atlantis.
Enjoy your stay.


If you want to link to my page, feel free to copy this banner or give me a normal link:

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#10 +Michail+

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Posted 19 September 2009 - 03:54 PM

Greek music....:cheers:



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Zorba the Greek is an Academy Award 1964 winner movie by Michael Cacoyannis, originally titled Alexis Zorbas, based on the novel by Nikos Kazantzakis.


Anthony Quinn played the title character in what may very well be his most memorable role as an earthy personality that always knows what he has to do to cope with hard times. He is ably supported by Alan Bates as the visiting Englishman.


The music, particularly the theme by Mikis Theodorakis, remains a haunting presence long after the film has ended. The movie was shot on location on the Greek island of Crete.
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#11 +Michail+

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Posted 23 September 2009 - 10:31 AM

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Enjoy the experience of heart-healthy eating with these delicious mediterranean dishes. By Elaine Gavalas

Greeks love to celebrate life with an abundance of food, dance, music and song, and will seize any occasion to host a feast. Fortunately, all this partying may be good for us. Modern research champions traditional Greek cuisine as the heart-healthiest food in the world. Landmark studies indicate the rural people of Crete and Greece have some of the world's lowest rates of diet-linked disease and obesity, and are among ethnic groups with the longest life expectancies.


GREEK INGREDIENTS

As proudly explained by Gus, father of the bride in the hit movie My Big Fat Greek Wedding, Greece has given the world many gifts, from architecture to philosophy. Certainly one of Greece's most valuable contributions is its cuisine.

At the core of the traditional Greek diet are dark-green leafy vegetables (often wild-gathered), including dandelions, spinach, mustard, fennel, cumin and purslane; fresh fruits such as figs, pears, plums, grapes, melons and oranges; high-fiber whole grains, beans and lentils; complex carbohydrate-rich pastas and breads; olive oil; nuts; and such herbs and spices as garlic, oregano, bay leaves, cinnamon and cloves.

Rich in immune-boosting antioxidants, the Greek diet provides cancer-fighting compounds, healthful omega-3 fatty acids and colon-cleansing fiber, which all help lower the risks of diet linked diseases, including heart disease, obesity and diabetes. A 2003 study conducted jointly by researchers at the University of Athens in Greece and Harvard University found that people who consumed a traditional Greek diet experienced a 33 percent lower risk of death from heart disease and a 24 percent lower risk of death from cancer.

Many Greek dishes contain cheeses, such as feta made from goat's or sheep's milk. These cheeses are lower in fat and easier to digest than those from cow's milk. Greeks enjoy thick, creamy goat-milk yogurt with fresh fruit and a drizzle of honey.

Greek cuisine is noted for its lamb dishes, but lamb is traditionally only eaten on special occasions. More often, Greek meals include fish (anchovies, cod, flounder and tuna, for example) in moderate portions throughout the week. As shown in several studies, the omega-3 fatty acids in fish oils help prevent heart attacks and high blood pressure.

OLIVE OIL POWER

[U]The ancient Greeks regarded olive oil as a gift from the gods
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#12 +Michail+

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Posted 06 October 2009 - 11:34 AM

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Customs and traditions in Greece and the Greek Islands are either of a religious character or coming from paganism. Furthermore, most of the traditions and festivals still celebrated today are religious.

Indeed, Greece is a deeply religious country, with a rich heritage of beliefs, traditions and customs. Most of the Greek holidays center on some significant religious event from Greek Orthodox Christianity, and local regional holidays center on an area
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#13 +Michail+

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Posted 11 October 2009 - 01:04 AM

by Daniel Scocco
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Along with Latin, Greek is probably the language that most influenced other languages around the world.

Many English words derive directly from Greek ones, and knowing their origin and meaning is important.

Below you will find 12 Greek words that are commonly used in our society.

[COLOR=dimgray][U]The next time you hear someone saying
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#14 +Michail+

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Posted 24 October 2009 - 05:10 PM

Greece: 5000 year of civilization (Music by Vangelis)


Greece: The land Chosen by the Gods (Bouzouki Music)


Greece: The colours of the Greek Islands (Great Zorba Music)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LOr2EiQvvdA&feature=related

Greece: Ancient Greek Innovations (Relaxing music)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BCQuJPueZ_I&feature=related

Wisdom of Ages: Plato quotes
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yO4Cvd2_3zU

to be continued.....
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#15 +Michail+

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Posted 24 October 2009 - 07:14 PM

Famous quotes about Greeks
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uBDJJAJ94Gk&feature=related

Famous quotes about Greeks II


Quotes about Greece and the Greek Spirit in WW2! (from Roosvelt, Stalin, Churchill, de Gaul, Hitler, Moscow Radio etc.).....Interesting.

*The table with the casualties is wrong in the video

...because only WE, contrary to the barbarians, NEVER count the enemy in battle!
Aeschylus (the Father of Tragedy)


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#16 +Michail+

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Posted 23 November 2009 - 02:12 PM

World Heritage Sites in Greece



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Acropolis


Acropolis, Athens




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[LEFT] [LEFT] [LEFT] [LEFT] [LEFT]
Bassae

Since 2007 : Old Town of Corfu (Greece), on the Island of Corfu, with its three Venetian forts and neo-classical housing was inscribed as a fortified Mediterranean port town of high integrity and authenticity included in UNESCO
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#17 +Michail+

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Posted 18 January 2010 - 04:17 PM

gathered from the net, ...i love these facts.:)


55% of the youth in Greece, graduate from a 4yr college - Highest rate in the world.

Greece has the lowest crime rate in Europe, and second in the world.

85% of Greek people own their accommodation - the highest rate in the EU.

Greece is currently the most sexually active country in the world. (Durex Global Sex Survey):kiss:

Greece has the highest smoking rates in Europe :ninja:

Greece came third in Europe, when asking "Do you believe in God" -- 83% said yes. :angel:

80% of Greece is mountainous and 50% is covered by forests.

Greece is the 2nd largest mountainous country in Europe after Switzerland.

Greece has half the seismic activity of Europe.:scared:
Athens is the oldest city in Europe, and the birthplace of democracy.

Greece enjoys three climates: Mediterranean, Temperate and Alpine. :cool:

Greece is the only country in the world that is officially Orthodox (Christian) +

Greece is the only country in Europe where state and religion is united.:cheers:

Greece has the largest maritime fleet in the world. (15.5%) :respekt:

Greece has about 2,000 islands. (227 are inhibited)

During the World War II, Greece was the only country which had to fight 3 countries continuously (Italy, Albania, Germany). And it was the only country in which it held the most days of resistance. (219 days)

Hitler referred to Greeks durring WWII as "the bravest who fought with the highest disregard of death" (1943)

Winston Churchill recalled them "Greeks do not fight like heroes. Heroes fight like Greeks." (1941)

Santa Claus is Greek. (St Nicholas was a rich Greek that used to donate his money to the poor) :)
Apostle John wrote the book of Revelation in the Greek island of Patmos. :pray:

Greece is considered 'the cradle of Western Civilization"

The word Lesbian, was derived from the female warriors living in the island of Lesbos.:kory:

The "Lost City of Atlantis" is believed to be found in the island of Santorini after a volcanic erruption. :wonder:

The New Testament was written in Greek. :star:

Cleopatra was Greek. (She came from the famous Ptolemy family, and she was the only Greek ruler that spoke Egyptian)

13% of the English Dictionary is derived from Greek words. ;)

Interesting words that come from Greek are: Europe, Bible, Christ and telephone.:clap:

Greece is the only country in Europe that is considered 'Western' that is not geographically located in the Western part of Europe. :eek:

Famous ancient Greeks are: Homer, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Alexander the Great, Cleopatra. :happy:

Greece is home to the Olympic Games, and the Highest mountain in Greece is Olympus, in which the Greek Gods were supposed to live at.:D
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#18 +Michail+

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Posted 26 March 2010 - 11:32 PM

March 25 is both a Greek National (revolution against the Turks) and a religious holiday (Annunciation). March 25 is the name day for Vangelis or Evangelos/Evans and Evangelia or Eva.

There is a school flag parade in every town and village and a big armed forces parade in Athens. A big day for Greece and all Greeks.

The Byzantine Empire fell to the Turks in 1453 and the Greeks remained under the Ottoman rule for nearly 400 years. During this time their language, their religion and their sense of identity remained strong.
Posted ImageOn March 25, 1821 the bishop Germanos of Patras raised the Greek flag at the Monastery of Agia Lavra in Peloponnese and one more revolution started against the Turks. The people of Greece shouted "Freedom or Death" and they fought the War of Independence for 9 years (1821-1829) until a small part of modern Greece was finally liberated and it was declared an independent nation.

The struggle for the liberation of all the lands inhabited by Greeks continued. In 1864, the Ionian islands were added to Greece; in 1881 parts of Epirus and Thessaly. Crete, the islands of the Eastern Aegean and Macedonia were added in 1913 and Western Thrace in 1919. After World War II the Dodecanese islands were also returned to Greece.


Read More:
- Epidauros, January 15, 1822. First National Assembly of Independence: Why we started the war against the Turks.

- At the end of April 1825, Ibrahim Pascha began the siege of Messolongi, a town in central Greece. Finally, in the night of the 10th to 11th of April 1826 the defenders of the town, which were worn out by the twelve-month siege and the lack of food, attempted a desperate and at the same time heroic exodus. Read about the last days before the exodus

- The Treaty of London for Greek Independence, the first official international act which acknowledged Greece as an independent state

- Lord Byron, the most famous of the philellenes (friends of Greece)

- Important persons of the Greek Independence War: Theodoros Kolokotronis, Georgios Karaiskakis, Constantinos Kanaris, Makriyannis, Manto Mavrogenous, Laskarina Boumboulina, Andreas Miaoulis, Nikitaras, Papaflesas or Gregorios Dikaios.

- Memoirs (Excerpts) of General Makriyannis

- History of the Greek Constitution from the revolution until today (1821 - 2001)

Posted Image- About the Greek flag: "Freedom or Death" ( Eleftheria i Thanatos) was the motto during the Greek Revolution against the Ottoman Empire. It is believed that the nine lines of the flag reflects the number of syllables in the greek phrase "Eleftheria i Thanatos" = Freedom or Death. The line pattern was chosen because of their similarity with the wavy sea that surounds the shores of Greece.The interchange of blue and white colors makes the Hellenic Flag on a windy day to look like the Aegean Sea. The Greek Square Cross that rests on the upper left-side ofthe flag demonstrates the respect and the devotion that Greek people have for the Greek Orthodox Church and signifies the important role of Christianity in the formation of the modern Hellenic Nation.

During the dark years of the Ottoman rule, the Greek Orthodox Church helped the enslaved Greeks to retain their cultural characteristics: the Greek language, the Byzantine religion and generally the Greek ethnic identity. Today, Christianity is still the dominant religion among Greeks. Therefore the existence of the Cross is justified.

++++++++++++++++
The Greek Warlords give the oath "freedom or death" in front of bishop Germanos.That was the beginning of the end for the Ottoman Empire.
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#19 +Michail+

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Posted 30 March 2010 - 12:05 PM

Greek Easter, the most important religious holiday in Greece

Posted ImageEaster is the most important holiday of the year for the people of Greece. Easter is always in Spring and nature is most beautiful at that time. The weather is good, neither cold or too hot and it is perfect time for hiking or traveling around. Perhaps it is not the best time of the year for spending a day at the beach but you will experience the wonderful Greek Easter customs and religious ceremonies.

Greek Orthodox Easter Sunday is April 4th for 2010! http://www.greecetravel.com/


Posted ImageEaster is one of my favorite times to be in Greece for a couple of reasons. First of all even if you are not a devout Christian you can't help but be moved by the ceremonies and the way life begins again on Easter Sunday after winter and 40 days of fasting. If you go to the countryside or to the islands wildflowers are in bloom and the hillsides that are usually parched brown in the summer are green from the winter rains. You can't even imagine the fields of flowers and theway life seems to be popping and sprouting up from every crack and crevice. If you are not able to go to the islands or a village but have to stay in Athens, the city also seems blessed because everyone is gone. The streets are quiet and those people who have nowhere to go or who are like me and prefer to stay in Athens when everyone else has left, take walks in the streets and parks and the hills around the Acropolis which are also adorned with green grass and wildflowers.
Posted ImageI never really cared much about the church ceremonies leading up to Easter, with the exception of the candle lighting ceremony that begins at 11pm on Saturday night and ends after midnight when all the candles held by the people in and around the church have been lit by the holy flame and they begin their journey home, each person holding one. To me there is something beautiful and magical about this. I think it is the most important ceremony in Christianity because it affects believers and non-believers. To see the church begin to glow brighter as each candle is lit and then the masses of people walking through the city streets or the towns and villages fills me with a spiritual feeling of being part of something bigger than myself. Even in the USA when I have gone to the tiny Saint Barbara's church in Durham where people take their lighted candles and get into their cars and drive home, there is something special about being on the highway after midnight on Easter Sunday and seeing the interior car next to you aglow.
Posted ImageLately though I have taken an interest in the whole Easter celebration, not just the Easter Sunday ceremony and then the roasting of the lamb and drinking wine which of course is my favorite thing about Easter. For one thing people ask me about Easter all the time and by telling them that for me it's all about lighting candles, eating a lamb and getting drunk they may think I am some kind of pyromaniac, gluttonous drunkard, which is only part of the story. I actually come from a very religious Greek Orthodox family. However my father was the least religious member of the family, a socialist agnostic who took us to church twice. Once when our grandmother died and once for Easter in 1963 at Agia Thomas in Goudi, Athens. It was this Easter service that had a profound affect on me. We lived in an apartment right across the street from the church and from our balcony we could see the people leave the church with their candles(photo) and the fireworks at midnight. Soon afterwards all the people left and walkied like a candle-lit parade through the empty streets of Athens while the bells rang all over the city. From another window we could see a procession of candles making its way down Mount Lycavettos. A psychologist would call this an imprint. I have loved Easter ever since.
In 2003 John L Tomkinson, a scholar and teacher in Athens who has put out a series of books about Greece, published Festive Greece: A Calendar of Tradition. The book describes in detail all the holidays in Greece and how they are celebrated in various parts of the country. It was this book that inspired me to create this page. I suppose I could have written something about Easter before this, from my own perspective, but John's book gave me the background that enables me to make sense of my perceptions which in the case of Easter tended to focus on the lamb and the wine and everything leading up to it was just something happening in the background. Through John's book I have more of an understanding of Easter to go with the childlike attraction I have had for the most beautiful and holiest time in Greece.

Apokreas

Posted ImageEaster does not just happen in Greece on that Holy week. It begins with Apokreas, which is to Orthodox what Mardi Gras and Carnival is to Catholics. Several weeks of partying, a tradition that may go back to the celebrations of Dionysious, take place all over Greece with special celebrations in Patras, Athens, and in various other towns and villages, many with special activities such as the famous Goat dances of Skyros. In Athens the last two weekends of Apokreas people dress up in costume and go to the Plaka, hitting each other with plastic clubs that squeak, and throwing confetti. These clubs are thought to be a remnant of the veneration of the phallus from the ancient Dionysian festivals of Athens and in the town of Tyrnavo in Thessaly giant penises are paraded through the streets There are celebrations in Moschato and Rendi, between Athens and Pireaus, that are similar to being in New Orleans on Fat Tuesday. In Patras the celebrating goes on for forty days and as many as fifty-thousand people take part in the parades. But after the last weekend of Apokreas, known as cheese week (the week before is meat week) many Greeks begin their fasting on Clean Monday, which is a day for spending time with friends and family, going to the countryside and flying kites. From clean Monday to the week of Easter things calm down conciderably. More on Apokreas

Great Week

Posted ImageThe week of Easter begins on Palm Sunday and there are church services everyday commemorating the last week in the life of Jesus Christ. The evening services are the most well attended of course, except for Wednesday when the Service of the Holy Unction is held in the afternoon. On Thursday morning the service commemorates the Last Supper and the Betrayal of Christ. This is the day that the hard-boiled eggs are dyed red, signifying the blood of Christ, and the Easter bread, called tsoureki, is baked. The evening service is a long one and features twelve gospel readings. It is in this service that a two-dimensional figure of Christ on the cross is brought into the church and set up, while the church bells ring. In some places a vigil is kept in the church all night.
Posted ImageFrom the point-of-view of a spectator from Friday it starts to get very interesting. The nails holding the figure of Christ are knocked off and the figure is taken down from the cross and wrapped in a white cloth. A large piece of cloth, embroidered with the image of Christ, called the epitaphios which has been decorated with flowers by the girls through the night, is brought into the church where it is sprinkled with rose-water and more flower petals are thrown upon it. The bells of the church begin to toll and all the flags in Greece are lowered to half-mast in while women in the congregation weep in mourning for the dead Jesus. In the evening a funeral service is held and at about 9pm the epitaphios is taken from the church and with the bells tolling mournfully, is carried through the streets in a solemn procession. In cities, towns and villages with more than one church the epitaphios parades may join together at certain points. In Hydra the epitaphios is taken into the sea at Kamini as it is in Tinos at the church of Saint Nicholas at Kalamia. In some places an effigy of Judas is burned while in others Barabbas is. In Skiathos the epitaphios service begins on Saturday at 1am and the procession through the town begins at four in the morning as it does in Zakynthos. On the island of Kea in the village of Ioulida the three congregations meet in the square with their epitaphios after taking different routes through the village. (photo)
On Saturday the Orthodox Patriarch breaks the seal of the door of the tomb of Christ in the Church of the Holy Sepulcher in Jeruselem and emerges with the Holy Fire, which is then flown by Olympic Airways, accompanied by high-ranking priests and government officials to Athens airport where it is met by an honor guard to the small church of Agia Anargyroi in the Plaka. From there the light is distributed to churches all over Attika and the rest of Greece.
Posted ImageMeanwhile around Athens there is all sorts of activity this week. The central market has thousands of lambs of all sizes and in Psiri the annual Lamb and Cheese Market has given the neighborhood a village atmosphere as farmers from the island of Naxos come to the city to sell their goods. Athenians who still have connections to their islands and villages on the mainland are preparing to leave the city as are people with no connections. On the islands people are working feverishly to paint restaurants, hotels and shops, white-wash houses and get ready for the second busiest holiday week of the year (after August 15th the Saint Day of the Virgin Mary or Panagia). By Thursday ferries, flights and the roads leading out of Athens will be full. By Saturday Athens will seem like a giant village. It's a great time to be in Athens which is a good thing because it is a terrible time to leave because the traffic is so bad.

The Resurrection or Anastasis

Posted ImageAt 11pm on Saturday night pretty much the entire country is in church. The lights are turned off at midnight and the priest announces that Christ has arisen from the dead as candles are lit from his and then from each other. The tiny glow at the front of the church grows and soon the whole room is illuminated by the light of everyone's candles. At the stroke of midnight the priest intones the paschal hymn "Christ has risen from the dead and in so doing has trampled on death and to those in the tombs he has given life". The church bells ring in celebration, fireworks go off, ships sound their sirens and the light and sound makes the 4th of July seem tame in comparison. People greet each other happily with the words Christos Anesti (Christ has arisen) which is replied to with Alithos Anesti (Truly He has arisen). Then everyone heads for home with their lighted candles where they trace the cross three times above the door and to bless trees and farm animals. Most people either stay home or go to a restaurant for the traditional bowl of margeritsa, a thick green soup made from the intestines of the lamb that will be roasted the next day, breaking their 40 day fast which began with the end of Apokreas. Gunshots, dynamite and fireworks will be going off for the next 24 hours or more shattering nerves and blowing off a finger or two.
There are many traditions and ceremonies held around the country. in fact too many to mention here, but Tomkinson's book goes into great detail and is a very helpful way to decide where to spend Easter if you don't have friends or family to be with in Greece.

Easter Sunday

Posted ImageEaster day is most people's favorite day of the year. A lamb is roasted and friends and families get together to eat, drink, talk and dance. In some towns like Arachova and Livadeia, it is a community celebration with rows of lambs roasting in the village square. In other towns like Monemvasia, Rhodes, Hydra, Halkidiki, Koroni, Chania and Leros the effigy of Judas or Barabbas is burned. In Syros and Karpathos people bring their guns and shoot Judas as a scapegoat for society's ills. In the town of Asine in the Argolid they actually have a street battle with the men of the upper and lower parts of the village hurling insults and fireworks at each other. In southern Messenia people go to the main squares to watch the saetapolemos, which are rockets without sticks that the men hold while the force of the explosions makes them jump as if they are dancing. This practice supposedly goes back to the War of Independence when people of the area fashioned this home-made bombs to scare the horses of the Turks to force their riders to dismount and lose their advantage. During the afternoon the red eggs are brought out and each person takes one and hits their end against someone else's until the last person who has an un-cracked egg is considered the lucky person for the year.
Posted Image Many Athenians who have not gone home to their villages or to the islands will go up to Mount Parnitha or somewhere in the countryside surrounding Athens. After their meal some people pick wildflowers and make wreaths like Loula, wife of George The Famous Taxi Driver. (Every flower in this wreath was picked on our Easter Sunday walk in the hills on the outskirts of Athens. They were all growing wild on the side of the road.) There are very few ferries running on Easter Sunday since most people are with their families. There may be one boat a day to and from some of the popular islands and a few boats to the Saronics. People who stay in Athens until Easter Sunday and then want to leave town to celebrate in the country have to drive. From Monday until Wednesday it is nearly impossible to get a flight or ferry back from the islands and the roads are full of returning Athenians. Athens gets busier and busier and if finally back to normal with traffic and horns blaring as people get back into the swing of city life with renewed vigor. Besides being the holiest time of the year Easter also means that in a few weeks it will be summer.

Καλό Πάσχα= Kalo Pasha = Happy Easter

Greek Easter Recipes!
Try some of the following easter recipes! Posted Image Easter Bread Posted Image Mageiritsa Posted Image Easter Lamb on the spit Posted Image Red dyed eggs Posted Image Kokoretsi Posted Image Greek Easter cookies from Smyrna Posted Image Baked Potatoes with oregano
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#20 +Michail+

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Posted 23 June 2010 - 10:18 AM

Greek Beaches..........



Posted Image

As you may have already noticed in my guide I dedicate a special part to every island's beaches so that you know what to expect when you finally visit one of these islands or to make up your mind on which places to visit if your decision is based upon this issue.

It is a fact that Greek beaches are famous all around the world for the clarity, cleanliness and impressiveness of their waters' colors and many tourists come in Greece for snorkeling and diving apart from swimming since the bottom of the sea presents an interest that urges you to explore it. Beaches vary from place to place. The sand colors are different, other beaches are windy and others not, some have pebbles and sea weeds, big rocks or smaller, hot springs or cool currents.

Posted Image Posted ImageAnother issue that may come in handy in your own beach exploration may be which beaches are accessible by nudists and which are not. Where is topless swimming allowed, which beaches are mostly frequented by families, which from younger people or couples, which ones are tropical, which are sunny, which are beautiful and if there are taverns and cafes nearby, canteens, sun beds, umbrellas and is access to them easy or not? Many beaches can only be accessed by boat while others by bus, car or walking or a combination of walking and driving.

Here you will also find information on the isolated beaches of every island, the ones that most people don't know about but mentioned to me by locals and the busiest and most crowded beaches for those who need people around. Water sport facilities, water parks and extreme sports related to the sea are also available along with private, non-private, organized and non-organized beach information.

So, this beach guide will help you tour around the islands to explore the black sand bays of Santorini, the sunny nudist beaches of Crete, Rhodes and Skiathos famous all around the world, the turquoise waters of the beaches in Zakynthos, the shores surrounded by pine trees in Le**ada, the crowded and gay friendly bays of Mykonos, the long sandy beaches of Rhodes and the windsurfing beaches of Paros.

What is certain is that you won't be disappointed by the Greek beaches. Swim in the waters of as many beaches as possible and form your own opinions according to your tastes. Visit all the Greek islands since the one is better than the other and I can only hope that my guide will be of some help to you. Have a nice vacation!

Have a beautiful summer!:)
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