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#1 Venezuela

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Posted 10 March 2011 - 08:58 AM


Maslenitsa – Mardi gras russe – Russian carnival




La fete de Maslenitsa, qui dure sept jours, a lieu la dernière semaine avant le careme. C’est la semaine qui sépare les deux saisons les plus importantes du calendrier russe – l’hiver et le printemps.

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The holidays of Maslenitsa which are celebrated for seven days take place the last week before Lent. It is the week which separates the two most important seasons of the Russian calendar – winter and spring.

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« Maslenitsa » vient du mot russe « maslo » qui signifie beurre. Le beurre est symbole de l’aisance, de la chaleur et de l’amélioration de la vie.

La Maslenitsa s’accompagne des jeux d’hiver dans la neige, des descentes de luge, des rondes dansantes et de la traditionelle confection des bonhommes de neige.

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« Maslenitsa » is derived from the Russian word « maslo » which means butter, the symbol of wealth, warmth and a better life.

Maslenitsa is celebrated with games in the snow, sledding, dancing rounds and the traditional building of snowmen.

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On brule le « chuchelo » en paille, l’epouvantail qui symbolise l’hiver.

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The straw « chuchelo » symbolizing winter is burnt.

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Bonne fete de Maslenitsa !

Happy Maslenitsa !

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Photos/Text: RIA NOVOSTI ONLINE

Edited by Venezuela, 10 March 2011 - 09:02 AM.

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#2 Venezuela

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Posted 20 February 2012 - 12:32 PM

PRAVDA:

MASLENITSA IN RUSSIA !


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Maslenitsa is a Russian, Ukrainian and Belarusian religious and folk holiday.

It is celebrated during the last week before Great Lent -

that is, the seventh week before Pascha (Easter).

Edited by Venezuela, 20 February 2012 - 12:34 PM.

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#3 Venezuela

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Posted 20 February 2012 - 06:16 PM

Maslenitsa corresponds to the Western Christian Carnival, except that Orthodox Lent begins on a Monday instead of a Wednesday.

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Edited by Venezuela, 20 February 2012 - 06:16 PM.

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#4 Venezuela

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Posted 21 February 2012 - 02:04 AM

The Orthodox date of Easter can differ greatly from the Western Christian date. In 2008, for example, Maslenitsa was celebrated from March 2 to March 8 and in 2012 it is celebrated from February 20 to February 26.

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Edited by Venezuela, 21 February 2012 - 02:05 AM.

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#5 Venezuela

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Posted 21 February 2012 - 11:45 AM

Maslenitsa has its origins in both pagan and Christian traditions. In Slavic mythology, Maslenitsa is a sun festival, celebrating the imminent end of the winter.

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Edited by Venezuela, 21 February 2012 - 11:46 AM.

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#6 Venezuela

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Posted 21 February 2012 - 04:45 PM

It is the last week during which milk, cheese and other dairy products are permitted, leading to its other name of "Cheese-fare week" or 'Pancake week. During Lent, meat, fish, dairy products and eggs are forbidden.

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Edited by Venezuela, 21 February 2012 - 04:46 PM.

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#7 Venezuela

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Posted 21 February 2012 - 07:41 PM

Furthermore, Lent also excludes parties, secular music, dancing and other distractions from the spiritual life. Thus, Maslenitsa represents the last chance to partake of dairy products and those social activities that are not appropriate during the more prayerful, sober and introspective Lenten season.

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Edited by Venezuela, 21 February 2012 - 07:42 PM.

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#8 Venezuela

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 05:16 AM

The most characteristic food of Maslenitsa is bliny (pancakes), popularly taken to symbolize the sun. Round and golden, they are made from the rich foods still allowed by the Orthodox tradition: butter, eggs and milk.

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Edited by Venezuela, 22 February 2012 - 05:17 AM.

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#9 Venezuela

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 09:00 AM

Maslenitsa also includes snowball fights, sledding, riding on swings and plenty of sleigh rides. In some regions, each day of Maslenitsa had its traditional activity: one day for sleigh-riding, another for the sons-in-law to visit their parents-in-law, another day for visiting the godparents, etc.

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Edited by Venezuela, 22 February 2012 - 09:01 AM.

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#10 Venezuela

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 04:50 PM

The mascot of the celebration is usually a brightly dressed straw effigy of Lady Maslenitsa, formerly known as Kostroma.

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Edited by Venezuela, 22 February 2012 - 04:51 PM.

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#11 Venezuela

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Posted 23 February 2012 - 02:47 AM

As the culmination of the celebration, on Sunday evening, Lady Maslenitsa is stripped of her finery and put to the flames of a bonfire. Any remaining blintzes are also thrown on the fire and Lady Maslenitsa's ashes are buried in the snow (to "fertilize the crops").

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Edited by Venezuela, 23 February 2012 - 02:48 AM.

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#12 Venezuela

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Posted 23 February 2012 - 11:38 AM

Voice of Russia:

Week of blinys and bonfires in Russia


This Monday, Maslenitsa Festival kicked off in Russia. This week-long carnival celebrates the end of winter, featuring a variety of joyous festivities, blinys (pancakes), feasts and fistfights, and what not. The origins of Maslenitsa,” also known as Cheesefare Week, go back to the ancient Greek and Roman festivals, saturnalias and bacchanalias, when the Slavic people would bid farewell to winter and welcome spring.

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Edited by Venezuela, 23 February 2012 - 11:38 AM.

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#13 Venezuela

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Posted 23 February 2012 - 05:38 PM

The name “Maslenitsa” comes from the Russian for “butter”, which, alongside with milk and fish, is the key ingredient of most treats made a week before the Great Lent, when the Church calls on the people to turn their thoughts to the God and abstain from meat.

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Edited by Venezuela, 23 February 2012 - 05:39 PM.

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#14 Venezuela

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Posted 24 February 2012 - 07:58 AM

Since ancient times, spring has been considered the beginning of a new life. People worshipped the sun, which gives life to the earth and the living, by baking unleavened bread and later pancakes made of sourdough.

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Edited by Venezuela, 24 February 2012 - 07:58 AM.

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#15 Venezuela

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Posted 24 February 2012 - 04:44 PM

voice of russia

Shrovetide Week begins in Russia

Feb 20, 2012 10:46 Moscow Time

Shrovetide Week, or Pancake Week, has started in Russia.

The tradition goes back to pagan Slavs who baked pancakes to celebrate the end of winter and welcome the arrival of spring.

This coming Sunday is known as Shrove Sunday, or Forgiveness Sunday, with everyone asking their next of kin and friends to forgive them. The basic idea of Shrovetide Week is preparations for Lent, which ends in Easter.

(TASS)
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#16 Venezuela

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Posted 25 February 2012 - 06:08 AM

In Russia, the mother-in law traditionally paid a visit to the newlyweds to teach her daughter the art of making blinys. On Wednesday, her son-in-law repaid her the visit to treat himself to freshly made pancakes.

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Edited by Venezuela, 25 February 2012 - 12:23 PM.

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#17 Venezuela

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Posted 25 February 2012 - 12:23 PM

Maslenitsa has always been a time of merrymaking. Anyone who refused to take part in these festivities was believed to “live and die bitterly “. Photo: A pillow fight on the first day of Maslenitsa. The village of Shuvalovka, Russia.

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Edited by Venezuela, 25 February 2012 - 12:24 PM.

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#18 Venezuela

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Posted 25 February 2012 - 05:54 PM

The Maslenitsa week wraps up with the ritual of bidding farewell to Maslenitsa, or the burning of a Maslenitsa effigy that symbolizes winter.

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Edited by Venezuela, 25 February 2012 - 05:55 PM.

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#19 Venezuela

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Posted 26 February 2012 - 06:08 AM

The festival finishes on Sunday, the Forgiveness Day, when the Church marks the banishment of Adam and Eve from the Garden of Eden. On this day, people forgive their dear and near ones and seek their forgiveness to enter the Great Lent, the time of prayer and repentance, unburdened by any sins.

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Edited by Venezuela, 26 February 2012 - 06:08 AM.

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