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#1 Zharkov

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Posted 28 January 2014 - 09:17 PM

Facebook IS the U.S. Government, same as Google.

Check out the initial source of funding.


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#2 Zharkov

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Posted 28 January 2014 - 09:22 PM

FACEBOOK POSES A THREAT TO EVERY AMERICAN

Participation on Facebook could prove very dangerous to your future well-being. There is a reason that Facebook is aligned with both the CIA and the NSA. I have several credible sources tell me that all data posted on Facebook goes into series of cataloged files which culminates with each person being assigned a “Threat Matrix Score”. The mere existence of a Threat Matrix Score should send chills up and the collective spines of every American.

facebook internet browses you

When, not if, martial law comes to America, this Threat Matrix Score, of which Facebook data is used to help compile an “enemies of the state” list, your future longevity could be seriously imperiled. It is too late for people like Steve Quayle, Doug and Joe Hagmann, John B. Wells and myself to avoid being placed on this list. However, it is not too late for the average American to limit their exposure by NOT posting and participating on Facebook. Facebook participation should come with a black box warning:

    “WARNING: The views expressed on Facebook can and will be used against you. Participation in Facebook could prove detrimental to the length of your life. All political dissident views are immediately reported to the CIA and the NSA. Risk of repeated exposure on Facebook could result in you and your family being hauled out of their homes at 3AM, separated from your family and sent to a re-education camp”.   

    Before you dismiss this hypothetical black box warning as too much “tongue in cheek”, please consider that the NSA is presently extracting large amounts of Facebook data and I do not think they are compiling a Christmas card list.

    Facebook’s Welcome Is Wearing Off

Many of us in print and broadcast media are rethinking our association with Facebook.
Several of our journalistic brothers and sisters have been censored and/or otherwise treated unprofessionally by this entity. Facebook has become replete with trolls who patrol the cyber corridors of this monolithic entity chastising and censoring whoever exposes the liberal, anti-human, depopulation agenda of the New World Order. Whether it is gun control, criticism of NWO puppet Obama or anything that the alleged grandson of David Rockefeller,  Mark Zuckerberg, and his people disagree with, they will kick your Facebook account to the curb for daring to express a legitimate political opinion.

 
Facebook’s Zuckerberg, The Self-Perceived Purveyor of Integrity and Morality

    Mark Zuckerberg, the creator of Facebook emphasized three times in a single interview with David Kirkpatrick in his book, The Facebook Effect “You have one identity, and the days of you having a different image for your work friends or co-workers and for the other people you know are probably coming to an end pretty quickly. Having two identities for yourself is an example of a lack of integrity.”

Who appointed Mr. Zuckerberg to be the moral police and the judge of integrity? It sounds like Zuckerberg can take his place with Soros, Gates, Turner, et al., and the rest of the global elite who think they have the right to treat humanity as their own personal property and view the masses as a disposable commodity.

Julian Assange Assessment of Facebook

Whistle blower, Julian Assange, once stated that “Facebook in particular is the most appalling spying machine that has ever been invented. Here we have the world’s most comprehensive database about people, their relationships, their names, their addresses, their locations and the communications with each other, their relatives, all sitting within the United States, all accessible to US intelligence. Facebook, Google, Yahoo – all these major US organizations have built-in interfaces for US intelligence. It’s not a matter of serving a subpoena. They have an interface that they have developed for US intelligence to use.”

Never before in American cyber-history do we see such an arrogant and agenda serving entity operating their propaganda so far in the open as we do with Facebook. This propaganda end of the New World Order is being blatantly exposed.

Facebook’s arrogance was on full display when highly respected journalist, Jon Rappoport was banned from sharing his articles on Facebook. In this instance of blatant censorship, Jon’s banned article was merely a review of certain aspects of American presidents ranging from Nixon to Obama. Like so many of us that understand history and can see the tyrannical path that Obama is taking us down, Rappoport identified Obama’s unconstitutional missteps. And for daring to tell the truth, Facebook banned Rappoport for the mere expression of a legitimate political opinion.

Readers may also recall when members of Infowars.com and the popular talk show host, Michael Rivero were banned in December of 2012, until the public outcry for Facebook to reinstate their respective accounts backed Facebook into a corner from which they acquiesced and reinstated the previously banned media figures.

Rules For Thee but Not For Me

Facebook does not apply their holier than thou attitude to their own corporate behavior.
As Zuckerberg talks about rectifying Americans lack of integrity through timely Facebook exposure, Facebook fails to pay its own fair share of taxes as a result of tax loopholes and deductions.

Facebook paid no income tax for the fiscal year 2012, despite reaping $1.1 billion in U.S. corporate profits. While Americans have just been subjected to higher taxes, billion-dollar corporations like Facebook, General Electric, Boeing and Wells Fargo have all been able to avoid paying any corporate income taxes, reports the Citizens for Tax Justice.

 

The average American is placing themselves on the equivalent of the East German Stasi political enemies hit list by posting political views on the NSA-controlled Facebook.

My advice to all unpublished Americans is to immediately cease posting on Facebook, which is a direct conduit to being placed on the proverbial “RED LIST” and seek out alternatives which are  not New World Order friendly.

http://www.thecommon...every-american/


 


Edited by Zharkov, 13 September 2014 - 03:04 PM.

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#3 Zharkov

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Posted 05 September 2014 - 03:32 PM

WHY THEY ARE LEAVING FACEBOOK

 

I logged in north, south, east and west. I checked it at work and during Sunday rest. I liked and commented, posted status and song. I thought Facebook would last forever: I was wrong.

Apologies if that feels like a bit of a heavy introduction for a piece on the decline of Facebook amongst my peers but – like Auden’s love – I had always assumed the network would be constant presence in my life. A couple of times at university I wondered what would happen if people stopped using the site, or if it disappeared. I would have no physical photos of my college friends, like those of my parents’ that we sometimes unearthed at home; I would be stripped of the wall-to-wall messages we had built up over the years and left with only a handful of letters and cards.

Sometimes I thought about printing out pictures or saving some of the more memorable messages to computer, but I never did. Just like three-month summer holidays and the ability to function after four hours' sleep, I reasoned that Facebook would always be there.

But two years after graduation, to continue in the mournful vein in which I began, the site is crumbling before my eyes. There’s nothing new about predicting the demise of world’s most popular social networking site: articles in 2010 told us that “everyone was quitting Facebook”, 2013 was the year of “virtual identity suicide” and figures released earlier this year suggested some 600,000 people in the UK had “disappeared” from the site last December (a claim the California-based company denies).

On the other hand, Facebook has more users and is more profitable than ever before. As it celebrated its tenth anniversary earlier this year, the site which was famously launched by Mark Zuckerberg from his Harvard dorm room boasted 1.23 billion monthly active users and 757 million daily users. Despite a shaky initial public offering, the network is now worth $135bn, generating a profit of $1.5bn in 2013.

The problem with these death of Facebook/triumph of Facebook headlines is that they refer to the site or the company as a whole, whereas anyone who uses it knows that it’s only as good as the content your friends are posting and that you are interacting with. If my notifications are all from friends and family sharing stories they know I’ll like or laugh at, it’s a good site; if my newsfeed is full of people I met on my gap yah throwing buckets of ice over their head, it’s rubbish.

It doesn’t matter that technology websites are telling us that “everyone who’s anyone” is deleting their profiles – whether out of concerns about privacy or after learning that Facebook is trying to manipulate users’ moods. It’s when the people we’re interested in start leaving that it’s over for us.

And, for me, they are. Last month a close friend from university, now working in the arts and one of the heavier Facebook users I know, decided to go cold turkey. For a couple of years she had mainly been posting to promote projects she was working on, and decided this was coming across as bragging and unpleasant. Inspired by her example, another friend permanently logged out, explaining the decision thus: “It makes me depressed to look through other people’s pictures even though I know they curate their profiles. But mainly I don’t like living my life in a way that’s hyper-aware of how it looks to other people who – actually – I don’t care about. So I’d rather cut it out.”

So two fewer reasons to log on, and six years worth of photos and public messages between the three of us taken off the site.

 

Others I know are using it less and less, either because they’re worried about what their employers might see, or just because they don’t feel the need to update 500 people (+ THE US GOVERNMENT) on where they’ve been on holiday.

Whereas a couple of years ago I would have been surprised to find that someone my age didn’t have a profile (a fact generally announced in the same smug tone as someone revealing they never watch TV), now it’s hardly worthy of comment. And so I care about Facebook less, and check notifications less often.

It’s lemming-like, I know, to have followed my friends into the social network and then follow them out in this way. But the thing about social networks is that they only work when everyone’s there and everyone’s active. It was Facebook that gave us FOMO, or Fear Of Missing Out. Despite the record-breaking number of users and profits, it increasingly feels like the party is happening elsewhere.

http://www.telegraph...g-Facebook.html


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#4 Zharkov

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Posted 13 September 2014 - 03:08 PM

One thing for sure, the NSA didn't build those massively huge data retention centers to store their own personal information, they built them to store YOUR personal information.    If they want that much information on you, they are not your friends.

 

Don't give them what they want.


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#5 Zharkov

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Posted 13 October 2014 - 03:33 PM

Warning!
This page uses Javascript. Your browser either doesn't support Javascript or you have it turned off. To see this page as it is meant to appear please use a Javascript enabled browser or you may be executed by a Facebook SWAT team.


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#6 Zharkov

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Posted 02 April 2015 - 01:17 AM

ytr4.gif

 

 

ytr5.jpg

 

Facebook was founded and funded by the CIA’s investment company In-Q-Tel (IQT) which is this feared intelligence agencies not-for-profit venture capital firm that invests in high-tech companies for the sole purpose of keeping them, and other US-EU intelligence agencies, equipped with the latest in information technology in support of United States intelligence capability.

 

But to the true purpose of the CIA creating the Facebook weapon, this report chillingly states, was to implement their mass psychological manipulation plan against the American people outlined in their 1994 report titled The Operational Potential of Subliminal Perception. [Read full document (declassified) HERE]

 

Though many Facebook psychological manipulation test have been conducted against the unsuspecting American people, this report says, one of the most sinister was revealed recently, and as we can, in part, read:

Facebook’s secret human lab rat study on a self-described “massive” 689,003 of its users was published just last month in the Proceedings of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences under the title: “Experimental Evidence of Massive-Scale Emotional Contagion Through Social Networks.” The study said the significant finding was that “emotional states can be transferred to others via emotional contagion, leading people to experience the same emotions without their awareness. We provide experimental evidence that emotional contagion occurs without direct interaction between people (exposure to a friend expressing an emotion is sufficient), and in the complete absence of nonverbal cues.”

 

According to Facebook, this is what they did to manipulate the behavior of its unpaid and involuntary human lab rats:

“In an experiment with people who use Facebook, we test whether emotional contagion occurs outside of in-person interaction between individuals by reducing the amount of emotional content in the News Feed. When positive expressions were reduced, people produced fewer positive posts and more negative posts; when negative expressions were reduced, the opposite pattern occurred. These results indicate that emotions expressed by others on Facebook influence our own emotions, constituting experimental evidence for massive-scale contagion via social networks. This work also suggests that, in contrast to prevailing assumptions, in-person interaction and non-verbal cues are not strictly necessary for emotional contagion, and that the observation of others’ positive experiences constitutes a positive experience for people.”

 

ytr6.jpg

The Google weapon too, this report further warns, was, likewise, created by the CIA, and as conclusively proved by the extensively researched document released by British author, investigative journalist, and international security scholar Nafeez Ahmed titled How the CIA made Google: Inside The Secret Network Behind Mass Surveillance, Endless War, and Skynet. [Read full report HERE], which is as astounding to read as it is chilling due to its frightful implications.

 

As to how terrifying the CIA’s Google weapon has become, RSMF intelligence experts in this report state, can be seen evidenced in the words spoken by the former US National Security Agency (NSA) Director, General Keith Alexander, who recently referred to Google as “a key member of the Defense Industrial Base”: security state newspeak for the Military Industrial Complex.

 

And to the Google weapons role in yesterdays mysterious EAS “war test”, this report states, was to simultaneously shut down all counter-news sources and YouTube channels of dissident and antiwar websites, which when done in concert with the Facebook weapons “news manipulationeffectively kept from a massive number of Americans any access to real time (i.e. true) information.

 

In preparation for yesterdays “war test”, this report says, the Google weapon for the past year has been selectively targeting dissident and antiwar websites for outright destruction too…including Antiwar.com, The American Conservative, Mint Press News, the Corbett Report YouTube channel…and too many other such sites to mention in just one article.Facebook was founded and funded by the CIA’s investment company In-Q-Tel (IQT) which is this feared intelligence agencies not-for-profit venture capital firm that invests in high-tech companies for the sole purpose of keeping them, and other US-EU intelligence agencies, equipped with the latest in information technology in support of United States intelligence capability.

 

 

http://www.whatdoesi...m/index1856.htm


Edited by Zharkov, 02 April 2015 - 01:31 AM.

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#7 Dude111

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Posted 03 April 2015 - 07:25 AM

Facebook IS the U.S. Government, same as Google.
Check out the initial source of funding.


Yes but DONT TRY TELLING THE SHEEPLE THIS!!!! (They have been condtioned not to care or believe it)
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#8 Zharkov

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Posted 07 April 2015 - 08:14 PM

Facebook Is Tracking You Even When You Aren’t Logged In

Washington D.C.- Facebook is once again under scrutiny over its privacy protocols, this time after apparently violating European laws by tracking users’ internet activity after they have logged out of the website.

The tactic, known as frictionless sharing, tracks users’ activities on the web and shares it with other companies.

http://benswann.com/...rent-logged-in/

 

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

 

Note:   The nickname for the CIA is "The Company".


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#9 Zharkov

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Posted 15 April 2015 - 02:33 PM

CIA-backed company scanning all your Facebook chats

If you thought your Facebook chats are safe from prying eyes, you’re apparently wrong. Bosnadev says that Facebook’s chats are being scanned by a CIA-funded company, a discovery Bosnadev made after looking into some unusual activity on a website triggered by a link present in a Facebook chat.

“During the testing of an application we’ve set up in a non-published area we have noticed some unusual activity. The link for the app was sent via Facebook chat and afterwards comes the interesting part,” Bosnadev said, publishing a list of “lots of IPv6 for a single Facebook check” as the aforementioned interesting part.

Further investigating the matter, Bosnadev tracked logs for a new URL address that was sent over Facebook chat and discovered similar behavior.

Upon researching Facebook chat scans, Bosnadev discovered information about a third-party company called Recorded Future that’s received funding from Google Ventures and the CIA. Apparently, this company was the primary culprit for scanning Facebook chats.

Obviously, it’s one thing to have Facebook scan your chats for preventing criminal activity, something the social network has been doing for years, and something entirely different to have a third party doing the same thing.

Apparently, Recorded Future “continuously analyzes the open Web” including links that have not been published anywhere else but on Facebook chat, which should be a secure location for private conversations. More details about this potential Facebook privacy concern are available at the source link.

UPDATE: Both Facebook and Recorded Future have commented on the matter, denying that any chat content is scanned by Recorded Future.

“Hi everyone. I work on the security team at Facebook, sweis wrote on Hacker News. “While investigating the claims of this post, we’ve confirmed that Facebook doesn’t use Recorded Future – an open source aggregator of public data – to scan any private content. That means we haven’t partnered with or directed Recorded Future to scan anyone’s message links.”

“It’s hard to tell precisely what’s going on based on the amount of information in the post. It’s possible that another interaction, including one that could be occurring on the client machine, is consuming the URL and generating this behavior. We’ll update if any new information is discovered,” he added.

“Hi everyone – the team here at Recorded Future looked into this and dug into our logs to confirm what happened,” user mattkrf also wrote on the same site. “Our systems followed this URL after it was posted on a public site. Our system constantly explores links published on the web. We’ve checked our logs and confirmed that this is what happened in this specific case. It’s not related to any Facebook chat messages containing this link. Our system doesn’t access that information.”

http://bgr.com/2015/...vacy-and-scans/


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#10 Zharkov

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Posted 07 October 2015 - 05:56 PM

"So I don’t know why they’ve been successful in pushing everybody into these little ghettos of these Facebooks and these tweets and these Instagrams — these instas. This is ghetto. This is corporate.

 

They’re taking your energy. They’re taking your energy and you’re getting nothing in return. Nothing," Drudge said.

 

"Ultimately, it’s boring, and the kids are always off to something new. Except for the something new is owned by the same freakin' company or financed by the same banking system.”

 

http://www.wnd.com/2...ed/?cat_orig=us


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#11 Zharkov

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Posted 28 December 2015 - 04:23 PM

FACEBOOK BECOMES A THREAT TO RUSSIANS

 

Dear Facebook, please don't hand our data to the Kremlin

 

Andrei Soldatov

In south-west Moscow in a 19-storey grey and white high rise block lies the heart of the Russian internet.

 

Known as MSK-IX, it’s the oldest and biggest information exchange in the country, and has been located here since the mid-1990s. Today, almost half of Russia’s internet traffic passes through its doors.

 

Amongst the servers, entangled by yellow and grey fibre optic cables, are boxes marked “SORM” – System of Operative Search Measures. These small boxes are essentially backdoors onto the internet, allowing the FSB (the Russian security service) to intercept all the traffic passing through.

 

SORM, which was initially developed to monitor traditional phone lines in the late 1980s, has been constantly updated, first to intercept mobile calls and now to monitor the internet.

 

The FSB has also installed SORM boxes in the buildings of every Russian internet service provider in the country, to catch the traffic that doesn’t come through the capital – making the programme one of the most ambitious and intrusive in the world.

 

As a result, Russian activists, journalists, opposition leaders and NGOs prefer to use internet services located beyond Russia’s borders – namely Gmail, Facebook and Twitter - in an attempt to keep their communications out of reach.

But the Kremlin has put an end to this: in July 2014, Moscow adopted a law prohibiting the storage of personal data anywhere but on Russian soil.

 

The law was supposed to be enforced in September, but in late August the Russian authorities said that they would not check for compliance until January 2016, rumoured to be because they weren’t certain that any companies would obey.

 

In September, Kommersant reported that Apple had rented space in Russia to house the data of Russian citizens. By October, Viber – a popular messaging app –also announced the relocation of some of its servers to Russia. Soon it was reported that Ebay, PayPal and Booking.com had decided to comply with the Kremlin’s demands too.

 

Yet during these months, the biggest players – Twitter, Google and Facebook – have stayed silent, at the same time allegedly sending high level representatives to host private talks with the Kremlin.

 

A lot at stake

If these three biggest companies open their doors to Russia’s security services they will lose control over their information, and it will seriously devalue the “global government request reports” used to track who is asking Facebook and others for information about their users.

 

If they give in to Russian demands the FSB will be able to help itself to whatever they want.

 

Another concern is that they will be able to get their hands on the technology companies are using to protect and encrypt communications.

 

If they comply, activists may be forced to migrate to other platforms, in the same many were forced to abandon Skype after it was bought by Microsoft – who were fully cooperating with the Russian government.

 

On 7 December, desperate users, worried about their privacy, launched a petition on Change.org addressed to the global internet companies, pleading with them: “Don’t move our personal data to Russia”.

 

“The Russian government is putting pressure onto internet companies to move the personal data of their users to Russia. We’re urging them not to do so” reads the petition. “We don’t trust the domestic security services that are in charge of data security.”

 

The petition, launched by Leonid Volkov, opposition journalist Alexei Navalny’s right-hand man, is meant to force internet giants to explain themselves.

 

It is gaining traction, over 30,000 people have signed it, but we are yet to hear a word back from the big players. Will they protect our privacy, or not?

 

Published in The Guardian, 15 December 2015


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#12 Zharkov

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Posted 28 December 2015 - 04:35 PM

The obvious answer to that question is, "NOT".

 

Keeping Russian data inside Russia is not a bad idea as long as that data is not used by security services to harrass political opponents, journalists, dissenters, etc.   The FSB should have NO ACCESS to Russian Facebook data without court order and no order should issue without some evidence that a crime was involved or connected to the Facebook account.   

 

Grabbing people's data merely because they are suspected of having politically-incorrect thoughts or beliefs is one reason why security services get a bad reputation.   


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#13 Higgins

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Posted 26 January 2016 - 09:29 PM


Grabbing people's data merely because they are suspected of having politically-incorrect thoughts or beliefs is one reason why security services get a bad reputation.   

 

 

It's all about control and detecting where the opposition could come from to challenge the power

 

Nothing has changed since the Inquisition.


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#14 Shura

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Posted 27 January 2016 - 02:21 AM

United States CIA has been doing all that for years


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#15 Higgins

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Posted 27 January 2016 - 02:54 AM

Shura

 

 

The USA invented the Internet, didn't they

 

That must be for a reason...


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#16 Shura

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Posted 27 January 2016 - 03:56 AM

Shura

 

 

The USA invented the Internet, didn't they

 

That must be to for a reason...

The invention of internet is credited to many people.But using it to spy on people  belongs to CIA


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#17 Zharkov

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Posted 28 February 2016 - 04:28 PM

Why Facebook founders called their customers "Dumb F-ers"...

 

FACEBOOK:

 

What kinds of information do we collect?
Depending on which Services you use, we collect (all) different kinds of information from or about you.

Things you do and information you provide.
We collect the content and other information you provide when you use our Services, including when you sign up for an account, create or share, and message or communicate with others. This can include information in or about the content you provide, such as the location of a photo or the date a file was created. We also collect information about how you use our Services, such as the types of content you view or engage with or the frequency and duration of your activities.

Things others do and information they provide.
We also collect content and information that other people provide when they use our Services, including information about you, such as when they share a photo of you, send a message to you, or upload, sync or import your contact information.
 

Your networks and connections.

We collect information about the people and groups you are connected to and how you interact with them, such as the people you communicate with the most or the groups you like to share with. We also collect contact information you provide if you upload, sync or import this information (such as an address book) from a device.

Information about payments.
If you use our Services for purchases or financial transactions (like when you buy something on Facebook, make a purchase in a game, or make a donation), we collect information about the purchase or transaction. This includes your payment information, such as your credit or debit card number and other card information, and other account and authentication information, as well as billing, shipping and contact details.

 

Device information.
We collect information from or about the computers, phones, or other devices where you install or access our Services, depending on the permissions you’ve granted. We may associate the information we collect from your different devices, which helps us provide consistent Services across your devices. Here are some examples of the device information we collect:

    Attributes such as the operating system, hardware version, device settings, file and software names and types, battery and signal strength, and device identifiers.
    Device locations, including specific geographic locations, such as through GPS, Bluetooth, or WiFi signals.
    Connection information such as the name of your mobile operator or ISP, browser type, language and time zone, mobile phone number and IP address.

Information from websites and apps that use our Services.
We collect information when you visit or use third-party websites and apps that use our Services (like when they offer our Like button or Facebook Log In or use our measurement and advertising services). This includes information about the websites and apps you visit, your use of our Services on those websites and apps, as well as information the developer or publisher of the app or website provides to you or us.

Information from third-party partners.
We receive information about you and your activities on and off Facebook from third-party partners, such as information from a partner when we jointly offer services or from an advertiser about your experiences or interactions with them.
Facebook companies.

We receive information about you from companies that are owned or operated by Facebook, in accordance with their terms and policies. Learn more about these companies and their privacy policies.

How do we use this information?
We are passionate about creating engaging and customized experiences for people. We use all of the information we have to help us provide and support our Services. Here’s how:

Provide, improve and develop Services.
We are able to deliver our Services, personalize content, and make suggestions for you by using this information to understand how you use and interact with our Services and the people or things you’re connected to and interested in on and off our Services.

We also use information we have to provide shortcuts and suggestions to you. For example, we are able to suggest that your friend tag you in a picture by comparing your friend's pictures to information we've put together from your profile pictures and the other photos in which you've been tagged. If this feature is enabled for you, you can control whether we suggest that another user tag you in a photo using the “Timeline and Tagging” settings.

When we have location information, we use it to tailor our Services for you and others, like helping you to check-in and find local events or offers in your area or tell your friends that you are nearby.

We conduct surveys and research, test features in development, and analyze the information we have to evaluate and improve products and services, develop new products or features, and conduct (tax) audits and troubleshooting activities.

 

Communicate with you.
We use your information to send you marketing communications, communicate with you about our Services and let you know about our policies and terms. We also use your information to respond to (subpenas, or)  you when you contact us.

 

Show and measure ads and services.
We use the information we have to improve our advertising and measurement systems so we can show you relevant ads on and off our Services and measure the effectiveness and reach of ads and services. Learn more about advertising on our Services and how you can control how information about you is used to personalize the ads you see.

Promote safety and (Homeland) security.
We use the information we have to help verify accounts and activity, and to promote safety and security on and off of our Services, such as by investigating suspicious activity or violations of our terms or policies. We work hard to protect your account using teams of engineers, automated systems, and advanced technology such as encryption and machine learning. We also offer easy-to-use security tools that add an extra layer of security to your account. For more information about promoting safety on Facebook, visit the Facebook Security Help Center.

We use cookies and similar technologies to provide and support our Services and each of the uses outlined and described in this section of our policy. Read our Cookie Policy to learn more.

How is this information shared?
Sharing On Our Services
People use our Services to connect and share with others. We make this possible by sharing your information in the following ways:
People you share and communicate with.

When you share and communicate using our Services, you choose the audience who can see what you share. For example, when you post on Facebook, you select the audience for the post, such as a customized group of individuals, all of your Friends, or members of a Group. Likewise, when you use Messenger, you also choose the people you send photos to or message.

Public information is any information you share with a public audience, as well as information in your Public Profile, or content you share on a Facebook Page or another public forum. Public information is available to anyone on or off our Services and can be seen or accessed through online search engines, APIs, and offline media, such as on TV.

In some cases, people you share and communicate with may download or re-share this content with others on and off our Services. When you comment on another person’s post or like their content on Facebook, that person decides the audience who can see your comment or like. If their audience is public, your comment will also be public.

People that see content others share about you.
Other people may use our Services to share content about you with the audience they choose. For example, people may share a photo of you, mention or tag you at a location in a post, or share information about you that you shared with them. If you have concerns with someone’s post, social reporting is a way for people to quickly and easily ask for help from someone they trust. Learn More.

Apps, websites and third-party integrations on or using our Services.
When you use third-party apps, websites or other services that use, or are integrated with, our Services, they may receive information about what you post or share. For example, when you play a game with your Facebook friends or use the Facebook Comment or Share button on a website, the game developer or website may get information about your activities in the game or receive a comment or link that you share from their website on Facebook. In addition, when you download or use such third-party services, they can access your Public Profile, which includes your username or user ID, your age range and country/language, your list of friends, as well as any information that you share with them. Information collected by these apps, websites or integrated services is subject to their own terms and policies.

Learn more about how you can control the information about you that you or others share with these apps and websites.

 

Sharing within Facebook companies.
We share information we have about you within the family of companies that are part of Facebook. Learn more about our companies.
New owner.
If the ownership or control of all or part of our Services or their assets changes, we may transfer your information to the new owner.

Sharing With Third-Party Partners and Customers
We work with third party companies who help us provide and improve our Services or who use advertising or related products, which makes it possible to operate our companies and provide free services to people around the world.

Here are the types of third parties we can share information with about you:
Advertising, Measurement and Analytics Services (Non-Personally Identifiable Information Only).
We want our advertising to be as relevant and interesting as the other information you find on our Services. With this in mind, we use all of the information we have about you to show you relevant ads. We do not share information that personally identifies you (personally identifiable information is information like name or email address that can by itself be used to contact you or identifies who you are) with advertising, measurement or analytics partners unless you give us permission. We may provide these partners with information about the reach and effectiveness of their advertising without providing information that personally identifies you, or if we have aggregated the information so that it does not personally identify you. For example, we may tell an advertiser how its ads performed, or how many people viewed their ads or installed an app after seeing an ad, or provide non-personally identifying demographic information (such as 25 year old female, in Madrid, who likes software engineering) to these partners to help them understand their audience or customers, but only after the advertiser has agreed to abide by our advertiser guidelines.

Please review your advertising preferences to understand why you’re seeing a particular ad on Facebook. You can adjust your ad preferences if you want to control and manage your ad experience on Facebook.

Vendors, service providers and "other partners".
We transfer information to vendors, service providers, and other partners who globally support our business, such as providing technical infrastructure services, analyzing how our Services are used, measuring the effectiveness of ads and services, providing customer service, facilitating payments, or conducting academic research and surveys. These partners must adhere to strict confidentiality obligations in a way that is consistent with this Data Policy and the agreements we enter into with them.

How can I manage or delete information about me?
You can manage the content and information you share when you use Facebook through the Activity Log tool. You can also download information associated with your Facebook account through our Download Your Information tool.

We store data for as long as it is necessary to provide products and services to you and others, including those described above. Information associated with your account will be kept until your account is deleted, unless we no longer need the data to provide products and services.

You can delete your account any time. When you delete your account, we delete things you have posted, such as your photos and status updates. If you do not want to delete your account, but want to temporarily stop using Facebook, you may deactivate your account instead. To learn more about deactivating or deleting your account, click here. Keep in mind that information that others have shared about you is not part of your account and will not be deleted when you delete your account.

How do we respond to legal requests or prevent harm?
We may access, preserve and share your information in response to a legal request (like a search warrant, court order or subpoena) if we have a good faith belief that the law requires us to do so. This may include responding to legal requests from jurisdictions outside of the United States where we have a good faith belief that the response is required by law in that jurisdiction, affects users in that jurisdiction, and is consistent with internationally recognized standards. We may also access, preserve and share information when we have a good faith belief it is necessary to: detect, prevent and address fraud and other illegal activity; to protect ourselves, you and others, including as part of investigations; or to prevent death or imminent bodily harm. For example, we may provide information to third-party partners about the reliability of your account to prevent fraud and abuse on and off of our Services. Information we receive about you, including financial transaction data related to purchases made with Facebook, may be accessed, processed and retained for an extended period of time when it is the subject of a legal request or obligation, governmental investigation, or investigations concerning possible violations of our terms or policies, or otherwise to prevent harm. We also may retain information from accounts disabled for violations of our terms for at least a year to prevent repeat abuse or other violations of our terms.

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Reading between the lines offers the insight that Facebook will share your most personal information with any government, and any government agency, that requests it.   In fact, they need not make even a formal request, just a suggestion that they might be investigating something and could use the data.   Most of the time, they can just click on the website and take it for FREE.

 

In the US, your personal information is protected by the 4th, 5th, and other constitutional amendments - unless - you consent to waive those rights by voluntarily revealing that information.    So if you use Facebook, you consent to waive those rights - for nothing.

 

You give them free data, waive your privacy rights, and you don't get a single dollar in return for giving them what they want.

 

And be sure they want to know everything you can tell them about yourself because they SELL THE DATA you give them.

 

They get rich, you get nothing.   Unless the government wants you, so then you get arrested.

 

You did it to yourself.   Another dumb "f-er" crushed by the system.


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#18 Shura

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Posted 29 February 2016 - 01:38 AM

I know that facebook shut me down, probably for the comments i made. And when I tried to log in they wanted my pasport, drivers license and proof of residence. I told them to screw off.


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#19 Zharkov

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Posted 04 March 2016 - 03:27 PM

Facebook Official Released From Jail In Brazil

Arrested in Relation to Request For WhatsApp Messages

Just one day after being jailed in Brazil, a Facebook executive is now free.

As reported earlier this week, Facebook official Diego Dzodan was arrested by police in relation to an ongoing battle with WhatsApp, the messaging app owned by Facebook. A Brazilian judge ordered Dzodan’s arrest as justice officials in the country continue to apply pressure to the company in a bid for messages exchanged through the app.

The messages are wanted as part of an investigation into a drug smuggling ring continues and it is believed those involved used the app to communicate.

The Washington Post reported Dzodan was released from custody Wednesday.

It’s an ongoing issue with social media networks and other Internet companies as governments demand access to information — including texts and private messages. Dzodan’s arrest, albeit brief, takes the issue to a higher level because he is not directly involved in the drug trafficking crime. Rather, his arrest appears to be the government’s way of pressuring Facebook into providing information.

Judge Ruy Pinheiro, who ordered Dzodan’s release, hinted at this, as reported by C Net.

“It seems to me that the extreme measure of imprisonment was hurried,” Pinheiro said, adding that Dzodan should not have been arrested because he’s not under criminal investigation.

Facebook condemned the arrest.

http://www.siteprone...in-brazil-jail/

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Facebook’s Data Practices Under Investigation In Germany

Facebook is under investigation for allegedly using its dominant market position to breach Germany’s data protection rules.

Germany’s Federal Cartel Office said it has initiated proceedings against Facebook USA, the German subsidiary and Facebook Ireland, the company’s European headquarters.

The privacy authority, in a press release, said it believes Facebook’s conditions of use violate the country’s data protection laws and may “represent an abusive imposition of unfair conditions on users.”

“Dominant companies are subject to special obligations. These include the use of adequate terms of service as far as these are relevant to the market,” Federal Cartel Office president Andreas Mundt said.

“For advertising-financed Internet services such as Facebook, user data are hugely important. For this reason it is essential to also examine under the aspect of abuse of market power whether the consumers are sufficiently informed about the type and extent of data collected.”

Germany’s Federal Cartel Office said it is conducting the probe in co-operation with consumer protection associations as well as the European Commission and the competition authorities of the other EU member states.

Facebook has been in hot water with a number of European Union countries. Belgian data protection officials last year asked Facebook to refrain from tracking citizens of its country who are not members of the social network.

Data Protection Authorities of The Netherlands, France, Spain and Germany followed suit, asking Facebook to take the same action in their countries. In a joint declaration published in December, the authorities called on Facebook to apply a cookie ban for non-users in their countries and across the European Union.

Facebook is currently appealing the Belgian ruling and is expected to do so in other countries too.

http://www.siteprone...data-practices/


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#20 Zharkov

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Posted 17 June 2016 - 03:55 PM

Family of Paris Terror Victim Sues Facebook, Google for Enabling ISIS

The family of a Paris terrorism victim has sued Google, Facebook, and Twitter for allowing the Islamic State to use the companies' channels to grow and recruit.

The Long Beach Press-Telegram reported Wednesday that Reynaldo Gonzalez, the father of California State University student Nohemi Gonzalez, alleged in a lawsuit filed Tuesday in U.S. District Court in Northern California that the three tech giants allowed ISIS to "use their social networks as a tool for spreading extremist propaganda, raising funds and attracting new recruits."
 
Gonzalez, 23, was studying abroad at the Strate College of Design in Paris when she was shot and killed at a Paris restaurant on Nov. 13. She was one of the 129 who died from the terror attacks, wrote KTLA-TV.

The coordinated attacks happened at different locations throughout Paris that evening, including a soccer stadium and a concert hall.

The lawsuit also suggested that Google's AdSense program that allows YouTube users to share in revenue from ads posted with heavily trafficked videos could have resulted in the company making payments to ISIS.

The newspaper added that Gonzalez's lawsuit also cited a Brookings Institute report claiming that ISIS uses Twitter to send out propaganda to attract vulnerable people to radicalization.

That report stated that from September through December 2014, ISIS supporters used at least 46,000 Twitter accounts and could have as many as 70,000 on the network.

"By virtue of its large number of supporters and highly organized tactics, ISIS has been able to exert an outsized impact on how the world perceives it, by disseminating images of graphic violence (including the beheading of Western journalists and aid workers and more recently, the immolation of a Jordanian air force pilot), while using social media to attract new recruits and inspire lone actor attacks," the Brookings Institute study said in its executive summary.


http://www.newsmax.c...6/16/id/734203/
 


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