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How the U.S. frees the Iraqi people


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#61 Guest_Yubakram_*

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Posted 28 March 2003 - 07:04 PM

Hey Katyusha, I understand that Iraq is still looking for human shields. I will send you a one way ticket to show your support!

Oh, by the way the UN has about a billion dollars in a little kitty know as the 'Food for Oil' program and will loose that with demise of the Saddam regime. - no pressure!
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#62 Katyusha

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Posted 28 March 2003 - 07:45 PM

You all surely have disdain for the common Iraqis by bulldozing them. Murderers.

I don't care about the Iraqis as far as how they govern themselves. It is not my concern. Why is it your business? Meddling Yankee imperialists killing to control the oil and the dollar? Too bad Saddam didn't trade in dollars instead of euros.

You wish me to be a shield? Why do not you go over to "liberate"?

Hitler would love you neo-con fellows. Social Nationalists...
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#63 SmallMind

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Posted 28 March 2003 - 11:16 PM

Another U.S. Missile Kills 58 in Baghdad

The Al-Nasr market is in the working-class district of al-Shoala. Witnesses said the bombing took place when the market was at its busiest, around 6 p.m. They said they saw an aircraft flying high overhead just before the blast.

Haqi Ismail Razouq, director of al-Nour Hospital, where the dead and injured were taken, put the death toll at 30 and the number of injured at 47; surgeon Issa Ali Ilwan said 47 were killed and 50 injured. Witnesses said they counted as many as 50 bodies.

The explosion left a crater the size of a coffee table on a sidewalk in front of a row of food and other shops. Curiously, nothing was blackened in the immediate surrounding area.

Another witness, Omar Ismail, a 35-year-old engineer who witnessed the explosion, said body parts were strewn across the street.


Down the road, residents gathered at a Shiite Muslim mosque, crowded around seven wooden coffins draped in blankets. Some of the men stood silently. Others sobbed into trembling hands. In the background, women cried, "Oh God! Oh God!"

"Why do they hate the Iraqi people so much?" he asked.






http://customwire.ap...EMPLATE=DEFAULT
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#64 platykitten

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Posted 29 March 2003 - 01:22 AM

Chenier, the point you raised about miseducation is one which has been in my thoughts for a long time. It is one worth pursuing but it properly belongs in the Science, Culture forum.
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#65 Guest__*

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Posted 29 March 2003 - 04:46 AM

What is baffling to me is that there seems to be a severe case of tunnel vision concerning Saddam and his actions.

Why have you choosen to ignore and not post the pictures of the more than 31,000 deaths this madman has inflicted on his own people by chemical attacks?

While your pictures paint a very horrific sight, I would urge you to explore the the pain and suffering a person endures when they die from exposure to a chemical agent. I would implore you to do a little research before you develop an opinion. I am sure given a choice, even you would choose a bullet.

And in closing I would like to offer you this small piece of comfort, Mr. Bush will enjoy the company of a great many world leaders of the past while he his aflame in hell, most notably from Russia.

http://www.theage.co...7749719178.html
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#66 usa_resident

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Posted 29 March 2003 - 05:04 AM

Seem to me that is would make sense to post every body part found in the twin towers. Justify just about anything wouldn't it. We can swim in self pity and self rightousness and then pull out the big one.
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#67 Mae

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Posted 29 March 2003 - 11:37 AM

They just said on BBC that the coalition forces destroyed something like 75000 ton of civilian food and supplies for Basrah.

Now, I start to hate England too.
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#68 superfreak

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Posted 29 March 2003 - 02:54 PM

There is no need for them to use nuclear weapons as I expect it would work counter to their aim. If they nuked Baghdad, that wont win the heart and minds I don't think. But they may use battlefield nukes of a few kilotons to kill Sadams bunkers. The problem however is no longer Sadam, but rather the hearts and minds of the Iraqi people, which one may argue have already been lost by the coalition.
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#69 Guest_Jane_*

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Posted 29 March 2003 - 02:58 PM

Atrocities by CIA (US) in Indonesia 1969, El Salvador, ACHE(now), TIMOR(1978-NOW), Chile (1973), Cambodia (after 1975), and Algeria (in the 1990s) have killed more civilians than jews were gassed in WWII. World trade center is nothing compared to US Atrocities. 1 million civillians, men, women and children were massacred by CIA staged terror warfare in 1965 in Indonesia.

<cut>For I do believe that if we can terminate America's management of atrocity, that is the best formula for helping the responsive atrocities to subside. For example, if public protest had deterred the U.S. from training and arming terrorists in Afghanistan after 1979, we might not have had the responsive atrocity of the World Trade Center by one of our own erstwhile terrorists in 1993. <cut>


.......This essay began as a study into the theory and practice of U.S. psywar, as applied to the Indonesian archipelago. Here the case for U.S. responsibility is more controversial than what has been conceded in Latin America. The scale of atrocity is also immensely larger, leading in the case of East Timor to the death of perhaps one third of the population.

This essay has grown as I saw more and more clearly the relevance of my research to superficially different massacres in Chile (1973), Cambodia (after 1975), and Algeria (in the 1990s). And I have come to appreciate more and more the difference between the two latter (which I shall argue were responsive to earlier managed atrocities) and Chile (which at the level of massacre was unprovoked, seminal, and ours).

The reader should understand that this nasty, obsessive narrative, however unpleasant, is in the end optimistic. It is difficult to handle responsive atrocities, such as that in Bosnia today. However seminal atrocities, precisely because they are planned, can also be controlled. For this reason I consider it imperative to address the residues of America's managed atrocities in the world today.

For I do believe that if we can terminate America's management of atrocity, that is the best formula for helping the responsive atrocities to subside. For example, if public protest had deterred the U.S. from training and arming terrorists in Afghanistan after 1979, we might not have had the responsive atrocity of the World Trade Center by one of our own erstwhile terrorists in 1993.

For three decades, with long interludes to preserve my sanity, I have studied U.S. involvement (along with other countries like Britain and Japan) in the great Indonesian massacre of 1965. Only in the last few years have I come to focus on what I now think was the defining paradigm for what happened: a psywar operation.

What opened my eyes was one of the first eyewitness accounts of the slaughter. This made it clear that the corpses flooding the rivers of East Java were not just dumped their to dispose of them; they had been rigged to float, and thus terrorize those living downstream:

"Stomachs torn open. The smell was unbelievable. To make sure they didn't sink, the carcasses were deliberately tied to, or impaled on, bamboo stakes. And the departure of corpses from the Kediri region down the Brantas achieved its golden age when bodies were stacked on rafts over which the PKI banner proudly flew."6

This exploitative detail, the display of mutilated corpses, has been recurringly cited for its horror as a symptom of "unplanned brutality,"7 or "mass hysteria."8

In fact it falls well within the parameters of planned U.S. atrocities. It is in particular a signature of U.S.-trained atrocity managers in Chile, El Salvador, and today in Colombia.9

The display of corpses by arranging to float them down river was a feature of U.S. counterinsurgency in the Philippines in the 1900s, and again in the 1950s.10

Corpses were also displayed by the Indonesians in East Timor after 1975, as part of a genocidal campaign supported and supplied by the United States. I will have more to say about the display of corpses, not because this atrocious detail is intrinsically worse than others, but because it is a forensic clue of techniques that have been transmitted through instruction.

Though less spectacular today, the East Timor campaign continues. So does the atrocity management in West Papua, a territory ceded by the Dutch (under U.S. pressure) to Indonesia, as a U.S.-dominated multinational (now called Freeport McMoRan) began to carry out plans to develop one of the world's largest known deposits of copper and gold. Closer to home, army and U.S.-backed massacres continue in Colombia, and increasingly in Mexico. With these examples in mind, I have chosen a title, "Using Atrocities" (rather than "Managed Atrocities"), to stress that the process we are talking about continues.

At least in theory, these processes are amenable to human control and amendment. We saw in the 1980s how the U.S.-backed atrocities in El Salvador and Nicaragua were terminated after Congressional action, especially after the long-denied massacre at El Mozote in 1981 (by a U.S.-trained battalion) was finally acknowledged. The delayed exposure of atrocities in East Timor has led to recent U.S. pressures on Indonesia, in the form of withholding military aid; and there are signs that Indonesia may soon respond in some way to the increasing pressures on it from the rest of the world........
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#70 raffphi

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Posted 29 March 2003 - 03:57 PM

jane i am a french guy and really i think your reply
was a great one

i dont know from what state you are
but it seems you know very well history i hope that your
post reply open all the american mind of what their gov have
made in the world during the last decade and what they are
doing now

Us french in history we too have made a lot of mistakes in the world but now i
really prefer being french that us resident
i have no problem to sleep with my conscience

one day goodness will win
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#71 usa_resident

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Posted 29 March 2003 - 04:48 PM

Jane,
The US has done wrongs (not mistakes, but wrongs) in the past. We were wrong in Vietnam, wrong in Iran, wrong in Chile, and wrong in the Phillipines.. We should apologize and help Vietnam in particular get back on it's feet.


BUT, you're not "researching" you're simply finding a way to blame the US for anything you can. The Kehmer Rouge did the killing in Cambodia not the US.

Bring out the facts you have, and display them. Let others draw the conclusions.
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#72 Katyusha

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Posted 29 March 2003 - 05:14 PM

Yes, standing armies are to be feared- especially when combined with a mega-welfare state's need to float its currency worldwide. Most Americans don't get that at all.
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#73 SmallMind

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Posted 29 March 2003 - 05:42 PM

More liberated Iraqi's.

Another man, identified as Saad Abd Qasim, stood as if in a trance, unable to speak.

Friends said his wife, his child and the wife of his son had been among the 50 to 60 people Iraqis say were killed in the raid.


***************************************
"We heard a plane flying over us. We saw a rocket coming in our direction, and then we heard the explosion. My shop was shaken but, thank God, I am safe," Eyad Abadi, 30, said.
***************************************
It had no immediate comment on Friday's hit on Shula.


Dr Osama Sakhari said he had counted 55 people killed and more than 47 wounded in the raid. Iraqi Information Minister Mohammed Saeed al-Sahhaf said at least 58 people had been killed.

Dr Sakhari said he had counted 15 children among the dead - one had died in his arms.

"I ask Bush and Blair to imagine how they would feel if their child died in their arms," he said.








http://www.smh.com.a...8653901318.html
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#74 lenin

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Posted 29 March 2003 - 06:13 PM

small mind always proves just that. small mind.....

Isn't Ray Charles blind also? Except he was blind from birth.
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#75 Guest_Patkay44_*

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Posted 29 March 2003 - 10:09 PM

James, BushCo is ruthless. They will do whatever it takes to get Iraqi oil for Halliburton even if they have to nuke em.
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#76 Gil Hughes

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Posted 29 March 2003 - 11:49 PM

James_A -------- The US will use Nukes in the not to distant future.

Hey!! Your the only country on the Planet who has used them before.

It will start with tactical Nukes.

The guys you have in the Whitehouse are the most likley to use them.
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#77 Guest_Stuka_*

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Posted 30 March 2003 - 12:01 AM

You lost friends in the WTC, and I am sorry that you did. But yet you are "hoping" the USA continues their bloodthirsty attacks on other countries, somewhat vengeance of what happened?

If thats correct, your opinion is nothing but supporting terrorism, from America.
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#78 platykitten

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Posted 30 March 2003 - 12:55 AM

~~~When will they ever learn?
When will THEY ever learn?~~~
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#79 Guest_Patkay44_*

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Posted 30 March 2003 - 01:27 PM

Does anyone remember when Saddam Hussein was given the key to the city of Detroit?
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#80 Guest__*

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Posted 30 March 2003 - 02:39 PM

two thumbs up for toby...
unfortunately soo little people who hold view like him...
the rest were divided into two groups:
- disillusioned 'angels'
- greedy 'devils' who trick the disillusioned 'angels'
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