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US Unemployment Rate 20%, could it be?


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#41 Bader

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Posted 25 April 2003 - 12:09 AM

The definition of unemployment as with that of inflation changes
from time to time for the purposes of political damage control.
Like moving the goalposts to insure one always wins.
Who loses? The public.
Are systems made for people or are people made for systems?
The term "under employment" should have replaced unemployment years ago in order to address the real situation
then.
Even if people were all fully employed but under paid the result
is the same.
We need to get away from our early industrial revolution thinking
if we are going to start to address our social problems.
What is it we really want? Is it work? Is it the money? Or is it
a healthy creative life?
If it's the latter then the former ones are just means (systems) to that end.
Technology creates under-employment which in tern creates
under funded consumers. Thus the system of wages and salaries
for issuing consumer demand (money) is obsolete.
Recirulating a portion of the insufficient wages and salaries through government benefits to the underemployed and adding the burdon of the cost of credit cards being used to compensate
the already inefficent system is wipping a near dead horse.
It's interesting that when ever this subject of employment figure
comes up people willing jump in front of the train of reality and
try and defend a system that never breaks out of the cycles of
varing degrees of hopelessly inaddiquacy.
Underemployment has now been supercede by under-funded
consumers. Neither the Japanese nor the American public are
capable of spending their economies out of their recessions,
even on a termorary basis.
Let's not think about the unthinkable, lets just argue over now
real some of these statistics on unemployment are or might not be.
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#42 vietnambob

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Posted 25 April 2003 - 09:28 PM

Regular time, overtime, and yes, double time this week. In fact if the plant is open and I can stay awake, I can go in...almost.

Right when I was really starting to really enjoy unemployment the stinking phone rings.

Don't get me wrong. I am glad to have my job back...but the circumstances are irritating as I would never be allowed to do what someone else did. Is the company at fault-no not at all. It's the US government that is. Pure and simple. The companies play the game the government draws up. These games are most often devised more to win elections or gain support other than out of any semblance of fairness to all the people.

This girl was a minority (not black). All minorities have much power here in the courts. The dispicable white male here has nothing there and this was ensured basically by infinetely more dispicable white males in his Congress.

To make a short story long she was given two last chances to take a voluntary layoff. When faced with doing a job that gets you dirty she took the second chance to sit at home and collect the free money. I got the dirty job back and I'm glad but....I can't help but know this same choice would never have been given to me and it's not a great feeling. I know exactly where the fault in this lies and it's near a river called the Potomac. They made the rules that let companies tire of me they say 'Hit the road Jack and don't you come back no more no more!' And that's it. Little or nothing I could ever do. These people near that river also made the rules to protect others to the max. But they did keep their jobs didn"t they?

World it isn't only just you. At least you can say another nation did it to you.

I can't.
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#43 Guest__*

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Posted 26 April 2003 - 04:46 AM

America haters? More like people who hate what is being done to America by Dubya and his neo con rat pack. 2 wars in 2 years, he's going for the land speed record for destroying our country, while he's on his mission from God. Guess he watched the Blues Brothers movie one too many times. He really thinks he's God's man. Now isn't that a scary thought.....
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#44 SmallMind

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Posted 26 April 2003 - 09:45 AM

I have to disagree that minorities have it made. Oh they get the preferential treatment for SOME of the $10 jobs, but what about the $1000 jobs? Just how many minorities do you see in upper management? Are you going to say that minorities dont have the capacity to lead multi-billion corporations? If that was the case you would not see large companies in china and india, let alone other parts of the world.

It is still a white man's world, the jobs with the perks still go to them and so does the country club memberships. The likes of massa's slaves powel and condi are only eye candy, they must have bent pretty darn low and opened wide to get where they are and are the true traitors to their kind. Heck they are more white than whites themselves.

Just look at palo alto, on the west side you have million dollar white homes built like castles, cross the bridge to east and you find slums filled with poverty and unemployment. Always made me wonder.. Why count they just cross the bridge and apply for all those jobs just waiting unfilled for years. Until I saw that they can apply but they wont get it because they are not with the in crowd.
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#45 SmallMind

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Posted 27 April 2003 - 07:45 PM

Jobless and Hopeless, Many Quit the Labor Force

"There aren't any jobs, just not any," Mr. Jacobs said. "I had been waiting it out. I thought there was a strong possibility that I'd get recalled to the plant, or I'd get something else, anything that paid at least $10 an hour. But it turns out there is nothing. It's a dead-end street."

Over the last two years, the portion of Americans in the labor force - those who are either working or actively looking for work - has fallen 0.9 percentage points to 66.2 percent, the largest drop in almost 40 years.

More than 74.5 million adults were considered outside of the labor force last month, up more than 4 million since March 2001, the Department of Labor says. They are people who fall outside the government's definitions of either employed or unemployed: they do not hold jobs, but they also have not gone out seeking work within the past month.






http://www.nytimes.c...7686e38fb2baa5f
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#46 Saddam

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Posted 27 April 2003 - 07:46 PM

I wonder how's Enron these days ????
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#47 Eric

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Posted 27 April 2003 - 08:21 PM

"THE EMPLOYMENT SITUATION: MARCH 2003

Total nonfarm payroll employment declined by 108,000 in March, while the unemployment rate was unchanged at 5.8 percent, the Bureau of Labor Statistics of the U.S. Department of Labor reported today. Employment continued to decline in manufacturing, retail trade, and transportation.
Government employment also was down over the month."

It''s not like it's hard to find the facts on this stuff, in a free society like the US.
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#48 SmallMind

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Posted 28 April 2003 - 08:46 AM

The only thing free is yahoo..

maybe not.
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#49 Eric

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Posted 28 April 2003 - 04:47 PM

SmallMind-

Your name says it all.
Condoleeza Rice is a token? She'd wipe the floor with you in a debate, as would Powell. They have credentials to be where they are. Why is it that people like you can't appreciate the fact that there are capable and intelligent African Americans, as well as other monorities.
If they don't achieve, you say they're being oppressed, if they do achieve, you call them tokens.
I guess the thought of a capable, intelligent, credentialled African American man or woman working at the highest levels of our government is something you can't believe can happen.
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#50 SmallMind

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Posted 30 April 2003 - 11:22 PM

What now meyers? Looks lie its outa gas and no station in sight.

The Bush Economy
April 29, 2003
By Justin Hill

Americans have finally stood up against President George W. Bush's failed revival of trickle-down economics. Last week, the Senate denied Bush his plutocrat-tilted tax plan for a scaled down version aimed at immediate economic stimulus.

Chairman of the Federal Reserve Board Alan Greenspan, in speaking out against the dividend tax cut, could have delivered the prophetic kiss of death in early February when he doubted the stimulative effects of Bush's dividend tax elimination, according to CNNMoney. Americans and some courageous congressmen on both sides of the aisle have joined Greenspan in declaring that a time of war, nation building and ballooning deficits is not the time to push a large, questionable and heavily slanted tax cut on the United States.

Bush came into office with a stalled economy and claimed to hold the key to its revival with his $1.8 trillion tax cut. Granted, Bush inherited the tail end of a slightly inflated economic boom, but the current state of the economy is inexcusable.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, since Bush took office, unemployment has risen 43 percent, 2.7 million people have become unemployed with 2.4 million coming from the private sector and the Clinton legacy 4.2 percent unemployment rate has gone up to 5.8 percent. Bush is actually the only president to post an average monthly job loss since the Bureau began keeping statistics in 1939. No longer can he pin the blame on Clinton. His tax cuts have been in place for more than two years, and America is still in an economic recession.

Since jobs do not wholly represent the health of the economy, one might look at the stock market since more than half of the United States is now invested. The Wall Street Journal reported that investors have lost $2.8 trillion since Bush's inauguration and the Dow, S&P 500 and Nasdaq have all fallen more than 15 percentage points. Along with jobs and the stock market in the toilet, America's federal deficit is in the red for the first time since 1997 while the Bush administration condescendingly refers to Rubinomics as baseless and ineffective.

Bush has proven many things since taking office. He has proven that he is not as inept as many believed. He proved he could console and lead the country after a tragedy. He has shown great political skill and has easily installed many aspects of his agenda for the United States, all with a closely divided Congress. Currently, he is proving that he can proceed down a road of foreign policy that is divisive and exploratory at best. He has also proven he cannot responsibly steer the economy into growth and progress.

Former President George Bush earned a superior resume and a longer list of accomplishments than his son throughout his career but found out quickly that a failing economy is the albatross on the neck of a floundering president. Bush used his pseudo-mandate of election in 2000 to push his massive tax cuts, which were overwhelmingly tilted to the hyper-rich to avoid a one-term presidency. Those tax cuts have put Americans deeper in debt and economic stimulation is still unseen.

The current White House has proven its incompetence in maintaining a healthy economy and has chosen to pursue an agenda to help its donors and corporate bedpartners. The talk of short-term stimulus has obviously not been the practical aim of the administration. The reduction of the burden on the working class has been overlooked. It has chosen to focus tax adjustments on the upper brackets of the U.S. progressive tax system while overlooking the most regressive tax in the United States, the payroll tax.

The Bush economic plan centers on corporate welfare, tax rebates to the richest 1 percent of Americans and corporate investor incentives in a blurred quest for economic stimulation. Bush is still advocating what his father referred to as "voodoo economics." One could argue that it succeeded under Reagan, although the wealth distribution under Reagan was so skewed it resembled the early 1900s wealth stratification.

Furthermore, Bush is reigning in a new era of corporate excesses by allowing corporate and industry executives to completely govern themselves. Corporations are given discretion over their polluting and pollution controls, labor unions have stricter financial disclosure rules than corporations such as Enron, and America's energy plan now includes controlling the oil resources of other countries in "trust."

U.S. priorities have faded and America's direction is sketchy. No matter what ideology one claims, the United States is in dire need of an economic jump-start that confronts corporate crime, workers rights and the environment. So far this administration has succeeded in cloaking the issues most Americans hold paramount in war and a constant state of fear. It might be time for the administration to swallow its pride and start tackling the burgeoning deficit and disappearing middle class because its tax cuts have proven they are not the paths to economic prosperity.


http://www.democrati...29_economy.html
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#51 SmallMind

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Posted 01 May 2003 - 09:54 AM

so you want to wave a wand or somthin an fix it?
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#52 Eric

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Posted 01 May 2003 - 10:13 AM

Every year I receive a tax deductible 'gift' from a rich relative. Depending on their yearly income, which in their retirement is stock based, it can range from the 10s of thousands to just thousands. But my point is that this is classic 'trickle down' economics at work. The gift is a deduction for them, and is tax free for me. I realize I am fortunate in this regard, and I realize many Americans don't get this perk, but it is important to remember that these kinds of things do happen in the US economic background. Not being part of the top 1% of wealthy Americans, I nonetheless benefit from them.
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#53 Katyusha

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Posted 01 May 2003 - 04:51 PM

Don't post accolades for Condoleeza Rice- what an Affirmative Action poster child. Welfare state executive.
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#54 Guest_Viking396_*

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Posted 01 May 2003 - 06:13 PM

I'll take the USA and it's 11.9 and see your countries 99 Saddam and raise you one missing dictator. :D
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#55 Eric

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Posted 01 May 2003 - 11:15 PM

"Don't post accolades for Condoleeza Rice- what an Affirmative Action poster child. Welfare state executive"

Are you out of your mind? She's a genius. Her college years alone are amazing, not to mention what she's done since. You are truly a bigot.
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#56 SmallMind

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Posted 01 May 2003 - 11:34 PM

Sure vicky.. Hope you didnt have any money saved up when you are an ole geezer.. Now if you were smart you would break both legs and collect it as supplemental comp and get your mony out any way you can..

But hey its nice to have people pay for hmmmm the Queen's investment.. And Israel's hmmm economic miracle and Egypts's long lost minarets.








Social Security statement will warn about funds Aparna Kumar, Los Angeles Times Published May 1, 2003 SSEC01


WASHINGTON, D.C. -- Your next annual statement from the government estimating your Social Security retirement benefits will state in blunt language that those funds are in jeopardy.


http://www.startribu...84/3857521.html
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#57 Katyusha

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Posted 02 May 2003 - 02:28 AM

No, I am a racist, Eric. Good grief- get the terminology right.

Okay then rocket boy, name one book she has authored on her field of expertise...

You cannot- because she is the only person to hold that office who has not been published- at least as late as fall 2002. But, then again, her boss is not a fan of books nor the English language. Fitting.

If you want real mythology, read Edith Hamilton's book on Greek and Roman mythology simply titled: Mythology.
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#58 Guest_Viking396_*

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Posted 02 May 2003 - 03:03 AM

"SmallMind - Sure vicky.. Hope you didnt have any money saved up when you are an ole geezer.."

Actually SmallMind I have quite abit saved for retirement. Sorry to dissapoint you.

"Now if you were smart you would break both legs and collect it as supplemental comp and get your mony out any way you can.. "

Or I could be smarter and leave it where it's at. SmallMind indeed, your name fits oh so very well.

"But hey its nice to have people pay for hmmmm the Queen's investment.. And Israel's hmmm economic miracle and Egypts's long lost minarets. "

Whatever SmallMind, get over yourself.... When I'm retired I'll be living in comfort while you're missing your legs and a few pints of blood givin to the blood bank to pay for your next happy meal.

Grow up.
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#59 Eric

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Posted 02 May 2003 - 08:02 PM

Boy, you got issues.

I'm sorry she has dissapointed you by not writing a book yet. Certainly that does mark her as a failure.

I'll just give you a snippet of what Condoleeza Rice has accomplished academically, aside from her career, which is stellar, and leave the rest to your rather limited imagination.

"...she earned her bachelor's degree in political science, cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa, from the University of Denver in 1974; her master's from the University of Notre Dame in 1975; and her Ph.D. from the Graduate School of International Studies at the University of Denver in 1981. She is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and has been awarded honorary doctorates from Morehouse College in 1991, the University of Alabama in 1994, and the University of Notre Dame in 1995."
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#60 Guest__*

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Posted 02 May 2003 - 08:08 PM

And I would qualify in the category of part-time for economic reasons. I've made enough money during my life (I'm 42) that I don't need to work full time and so I don't. Should I be added to the list of "unemployed?". The larger problem of unemployement right now comes from the 10 million + Mexican and South American immigrants who have flooded our country, undercutting wages and placing a huge strain on the finances of our country. Our teenaged kids have a hard time getting entry level jobs in many places around the country because you can hire a mexican for less than the cost that even a teen expects.

Finally, I have long felt that the United States and Russia should end up as allies, not enemies, my few Russian friends agree that we have more in common with Russia than we do with say, China or the Middle East. Sadly most people seem bent on maintaining an us verse them mentality regarding Russia. Time will tell.

Mark
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