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#1 inside bush

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Posted 26 April 2003 - 06:52 AM

Come Rumsfeld.
Metodi pacifici ricordano su Vo Nguyen Giap. Un amico di imperialismo (US). Non piace loro esso (US). Temo. Temo per la regione pacifica.
Il prossimo obiettivo?
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#2 pacific

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Posted 26 April 2003 - 12:00 PM

US Unemployment Rate 11.9%, naw coudnt be.
This is not even counting those who are unemployed for so long that they dont even count in the labour force.

[source: April 7 {WSJ} article, "Labor Market May be Softer than Reported;" Dept of Labor Bureau of Labor Statistics]

THE WALL STREET JOURNAL HAS DISCOVERED THAT OFFICIAL U.S. UNEMPLOYMENT DATA HIDE REAL UNEMPLOYMENT. Hundreds of thousands of Americans have lost their payroll jobs during the last few months, but the official U.S. unemployment barely rose from 5.7% to 5.8% between January and March. Even the Wall Street Journal recognizes that this is impossible, and is becoming a scandal.

Today's issue states that, "with all that is going wrong in the U.S. economy, economists are starting to suspect that the current unemployment rate of 5.8% ... could be underestimating the true level of distress in the labor market."

The Journal reports some ways by which the Labor Department Bureau of Labor Statistics "misses" the real number of unemployed. "Many laid-off workers ... are simply setting themselves up as independent consultants operating from their home offices." They are self-employed.

Many of these "self-employed" consultants may work only one-third as many hours as they did when they had a job--or have no clients and thus have no work at all--but they are still counted by the BLS as employed.

The Journal states that others, after months of futilely searching for jobs may have become "too discouraged to look for work"--indeed, this category has risen by 360,000 workers during the past year.

But the BLS has made "too discouraged to look for work" as a category within "Not In the Labor Force"; however, in order to be counted as unemployed, a worker must be classified as "In the Labor Force."

Thus, the "too discouraged" are not considered as unemployed.

Further, the Journal states, "some are simply opting to take what they can get, working part-time at low-wage jobs that provide some health benefits."

These workers are "Part-Time for Economic Reasons."

The number of such workers has increased by 500,000 during the past year.

{EIR} has determined a real unemployment level:

- Table 1 -

EIR's Level of Real Unemployment, March 2003

Official Unemployment 8.45 million

"Want a Job Now" 4.76 million

"Part-Time for Economic Reasons 4.70 million

Total Unemployment 17.91 million

Unemployment Rate 11.9%

Of the 8.45 million whom the BLS reports as being officially unemployed, 1.90 million, or 22%, have been unemployed for more than six months.

The strains on their family income are greatly increasing.

Il prossimo target e' come fare vivere alle persone una vita decente.
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#3 pacific

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Posted 26 April 2003 - 12:03 PM

Giap era un militare si occupava di come vincere una guerra nient'altro.
Una guerra civile e' il piu' aberrante dei conflitti.
Tutti i peggiori istinti e sadismi trovano sfogo.
La pace consente di guadagnare di piu' di una guerra affrettata e senza prospettive.
Do you know the difference between a VIET-MIN and
a VIET-CONG?
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#4 inside bush

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Posted 27 April 2003 - 09:24 AM

VIET-MIN and
VIET-CONG
long file 25,000,000 pages or short file?

Configuratione, did you ask Isabella Bossi Federigotti?
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#5 pacific

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Posted 27 April 2003 - 11:36 AM

configuration
n.

Arrangement of parts or elements.
The form, as of a figure, determined by the arrangement of its parts or elements. See Synonyms at form.
Psychology. Gestalt.
Chemistry. The structural arrangement of atoms in a compound or molecule.
Computer Science.
The way in which a computer system is set up: changed the configuration by resetting the parameters.
The set of constituent components, such as memory, a hard disk, a monitor, and an operating system, that make up a computer system.
The way that the components of a computer network are connected.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
configurationally adv.
configurative or configurational adj.

configuration

\Configuration\, n. [L. configuratio.] 1. Form, as depending on the relative disposition of the parts of a thing' shape; figure.

It is the variety of configurations [of the mouth] . . . which gives birth and origin to the several vowels. --Harris.

2. (Astrol.) Relative position or aspect of the planets; the face of the horoscope, according to the relative positions of the planets at any time.

They [astrologers] undertook . . . to determine the course of a man's character and life from the configuration of the stars at the moment of his birth. --Whewell.

configuration

n 1: an arrangement of parts or elements; "the outcome depends on the configuration of influences at the time" [syn: constellation] 2: any spatial attribute (especially as defined by outline); "he could barely make out their shapes through the smoke" [syn: shape, form, contour]

Isabella Bossi Fedrigotti ovvero Nel dubbio non darla mai :D
Never give she to strangers and to friends
She's a writer-journalist about Bon-Ton.
Monica Belluci and Nancy Brilli are better.
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#6 inside bush

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Posted 27 April 2003 - 04:22 PM

US Unemployment Rate 11.9%, naw coudnt be.
a rate Wall Streets cheer rate
b rate dont know why they release this one
c rate 11.9% lets see if we can find something new on the next fed releace (june 6).

As you did not say there is a statistical error within the c rate. Unusual but dont call me a polemic. I could not remember the gov. webpage I got the message from.

Nothing to worry about as long as we have the usual enemy whom we can blame for. War feeds its people.

Fed funds within the feds web page better than N. Mailer.
Not to be missunderstood its a page for European use only.
Die Leichen im Keller among other things.
Comittment of trades, what Wallstreets heros do. Well I do think they are unpatriotic they are the real believers. Euro is their credo. To ceep things running Wall Street needs one billion Dollars from foreighn countries per day.

Conclusion; Greenspan, the accrobat (Mother Theresa), dont lough, the only one concerned about the people without work. :D
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#7 pacific

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Posted 27 April 2003 - 04:40 PM

In Europe the rate of Unemployment over 6% is a tragedy.
Between U.S.A. and European rate of Unemployment there is some difference.
In Europe all the people without job is Unemployed in U.S.A. is not the same.
The USA unemployment rate at 11,9% is calculated with Europen statistical management.
It's a very big rate, a tragedy.
A Unemployment rate over 9% is not a good health of economy and of a country.
I've read also something in the New York Times and it's the same picture. Many people in the downtown is long down the streets without a job a without the hope of a work in perspective.
When you are full all the world is full when you are empty all the world is empty.
All this people eat once or twice per day.
What happens when the people don't eat every day?
The American dream is falling down in the minds of many workers.
Finance cannot grow-up without workers (workers=Industry,manufacture, and so on...)
Too many people without a job and without a perspective of a job is not a good sign to our future.
Someone says the economy is global if this is true our future is very dark in the western and not only.
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#8 pacific

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Posted 27 April 2003 - 07:51 PM

Jobless and Hopeless, Many Quit the Labor Force
By MONICA DAVEY with DAVID LEONHARDT


ITTSBURGH, April 26 - Worn down by job searches that have stretched on for months, demoralized by disappointing offers or outright rejections, some unemployed people have simply stopped the search.

As the nation enters a third year of difficult economic times, these unemployed - from factory workers to investment bankers - have dropped out of the labor force and entered the invisible ranks of people not counted in the unemployment rate.

Some are going back to school or getting new job training. Others have chosen to stay home with young children or aging parents and to rely on their spouse's salary, at least for now. Still others are plainly waiting: living on their government benefits and hoping that the economy will get better in a while.

After working 25 years in the heat of the factory line at a steel plant here, Bill Jacobs accepted his layoff calmly last year. He thought he could find some other job working with his hands, or go back to the line once business picked up.

But eight months passed, and nothing came. Not long ago, he signed up for nursing school.

"There aren't any jobs, just not any," Mr. Jacobs said. "I had been waiting it out. I thought there was a strong possibility that I'd get recalled to the plant, or I'd get something else, anything that paid at least $10 an hour. But it turns out there is nothing. It's a dead-end street."

Mr. Jacobs, who is 50 and raising four children on his own, said he had "absolutely never" planned to change careers. But he heard about the possibility of a government grant to pay for his schooling and decided he would prefer to spend the next two years tucked safely inside a classroom rather than continue to fight for a job in an economy he describes as "heading nowhere."

Over the last two years, the portion of Americans in the labor force - those who are either working or actively looking for work - has fallen 0.9 percentage points to 66.2 percent, the largest drop in almost 40 years.

More than 74.5 million adults were considered outside of the labor force last month, up more than 4 million since March 2001, the Department of Labor says. They are people who fall outside the government's definitions of either employed or unemployed: they do not hold jobs, but they also have not gone out seeking work within the past month.

This group includes retirees and parents who have been home taking care of their children for years, but the surge of dropouts suggests that the jobless rate - which was 5.8 percent last month, roughly where it has been for the past year - offers an artificially sanguine picture of the labor market, many economists say.

"People use the unemployment rate as some kind of gauge of the health of the economy," said Robert H. Topel, a professor of economics at the University of Chicago. But because of the number of people now outside of the labor force, he said, "the unemployment rate does not give you the same kind of information it did in the 1970's or 1960's."

Job counselors say the trigger for the exodus is easy to see. Among those people whom the government considered unemployed, the average length of time out of work has been rising over the past two years, to 18 weeks last month from about 13 weeks two years ago.

In Pittsburgh, members of one support group for unemployed people have been jobless for so long that the group recently started holding separate conversations during their regular Monday night sessions just for those who have been out of work more than six months. More than 20 people usually show up.

"This is what we see today - job searches that can take 6 to 12 months," said Charlie Beck, who has directed the support group, Priority Two, for the past 20 years. "By six months, people really start to doubt themselves, and they start to doubt they're ever going to find anything. They start to doubt everything."

Uncertainty crept slowly into Mike Guido's outlook. But after the third "really good opportunity" slipped away, "it started to dawn on me," Mr. Guido said. "It just wasn't happening. It wasn't going to."


Continued
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#9 pacific

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Posted 27 April 2003 - 07:53 PM

Jobless and Hopeless, Many Quit the Labor Force
(Page 2 of 2)



By then, nine months had passed since he lost his job as an engineer developing products for a Pittsburgh company that makes industrial and safety equipment. He had held the job for nearly 20 years and made an annual salary close to $50,000.

Mr. Guido asked around about academic jobs but was told his undergraduate and master's degrees would not be enough for an engineering post. At one point, a university professor told him he probably needed a doctorate.

"That was kind of a pivotal moment for me," Mr. Guido said. "Right then, I started thinking, well, wait, what if I got a Ph.D?"

So last fall, Mr. Guido, 48, moved his books into a study desk off the long corridors of the University of Pittsburgh's engineering building and began learning again how to pull all-nighters for classes like Advanced Elasticity.

Mr. Guido worries about money. He has a 10-year-old daughter, a mortgage in the suburbs, a shrinking retirement account and newly opened student loans for what is likely to take him three years.

"This is definitely not easy financially," he said. "The economy has sideswiped me."

Still, Mr. Guido said he was pleased to be back in school, learning about things he cares about, and relieved to be on campus, far away from the struggle to find a job. There are others like him on campus: a soon-to-be furloughed US Airways pilot in the law school, a laid-off former sales manager seeking his M.B.A.

"It's funny," Mr. Guido said, "how the moves you make because you think you have no choice can turn out to be good."

Most people dropping out of the labor force are men, the Labor Department says, and the number of black men not looking for work has risen particularly sharply. Teenagers who were drawn into the labor force in large numbers in the late 1990's have also left it recently at a rapid pace. But frustration with the economy has cut across almost every demographic group. For the first time since the 1960's, the proportion of women in the labor force has declined over an extended period. In March, 60.6 percent of women 20 and older were in the labor force, down from 61 percent in March 2001.

Amy Richards, 30, was one of the big beneficiaries of the 1990's economy, making $150,000 a year in San Francisco working for MatchLogic, an Internet advertising company. When the company went bankrupt a year and a half ago, however, Ms. Richards was left with a pile of worthless stock options and no job.

She moved to Boulder, Colo., where expenses are lower, and she has been living off her savings. "I decided to take a break, kind of get a breather," she said.

But the job market in Boulder is even worse than in San Francisco, Ms. Richards said. In fact, the Boulder metropolitan area is one of a few dozen where the surge in people considered to be labor-force dropouts helped decrease the unemployment rate last year even as jobs were disappearing, says Economy.com, a research firm in West Chester, Pa.

Others include Binghamton, N.Y.; Bloomington, Ind.; Florence, Ala.; Spokane, Wash; and Wilmington, Del.

Ms. Richards and a few friends from her old company are trying to start a business selling software to companies that charge for access to their Web sites. They are looking for their first investor and first customers. "I don't know if there's another point in my life to pursue a dream and possibly come up empty-handed," she said. "We may not get our company funded. It's a horrible capital market. I may have to end up doing something else."

Other people are still dangling, ever so precariously, on the edge of the labor market. They are still filing job applications, but they acknowledge that their searches have slowed over the months, and even years. Many have begun to talk about giving up on the traditional job path. The question is where they will go.

Some talk of starting up businesses. Others say they may have to settle for anything soon, even a low-wage, part-time job anywhere.

Back here, in Pittsburgh, Janis M. Leftridge has spent her career first as social worker, then as a human resources manager, handling other peoples' problems. She is 56, and a whiz at designing business cards, writing r?sum?s and leading discussions in her networking group about how to get a job. But her last job with the Bayer Corporation, where she made $76,000 a year, ended in 2001.

And in the two years since, she has emptied her savings. Last week, she was cheerily sorting out how she would pay the May rent.

"I'll figure something out, it'll happen," Ms. Leftridge said. "But it's funny how, when you're younger, you don't think you'll find yourself in a position like this. I didn't think I'd ever be here."

These days, she is spending less time sending out r?sum?s. Instead, she said, she has begun to research a new option: working from her home, selling items like health supplements, dishwashing liquid and coffee beans through a direct marketing company. The company has also told her she can make money by recruiting other sellers, she said. She carries the company's glossy brochures with her. And she is trying some of the supplements herself.

"I've been trying to find a conventional job for two years," Ms. Leftridge said. "Finally, I'm thinking about doing a home-based business. I don't see it as giving up. I see it as expanding my search. I ought to be able to make some money this way, and start building back my savings, in a situation where I'm not hostage to any company's budget, to any budget."


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#10 pacific

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Posted 27 April 2003 - 08:03 PM

Editorial Desk | April 7, 2003, Monday
Workers Who Feel Discarded

By BOB HERBERT (NYT) 781 words
Late Edition - Final , Section A , Page 19 , Column 1
ABSTRACT - workers who feel discarded**Bob Herbert Op-Ed column says United States is hemorrhaging jobs, but Bush administration does not seem aware of terrible distress of unemployed American worker; notes White House response to latest job loss figures is to call for more tax cuts; says latest government report is that 108,000 more jobs were lost in Mar; says 2.4 million jobs have vanished since nation's payrolls peaked two years ago; says official jobless rate of 5.8 percent is artificially low, because it does not include people who are so discouraged they stopped looking for work (M) ''I've gone through a few stages of depression and frustration,'' said Dina Ziskin, who is 31 and lives in Brooklyn. ''Why is it taking me so long? I panic a lot. I did not think it would be this difficult to find a job.''

''I can't tell you the number of divorces we hear about,'' said Janelle Razzino, who runs an executive search firm in Westwood, N.J. ''The job loss in these cases was probably the final straw. Nobody needs that kind of pressure, stress, whatever.''
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#11 Guest_westerby_*

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Posted 28 April 2003 - 10:34 AM

si parla italiano?
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#12 pacific

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Posted 28 April 2003 - 04:36 PM

Noi facciamo esercizio di lingua italiano.
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#13 inside bush

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Posted 28 April 2003 - 06:17 PM

The a rate (cheer rate)
Last month, the unemployment rate was expected to increase to 5.9 percent from 5.8 percent. We got a reprieve that time with an actual rate of 5.8 percent. On Friday morning, the consensus estimate still calls for the unemployment rate to tick up to 5.9 percent as jobs continue to be trimmed.(April 25, 2003)

As long as you ceep people on high alert (terror).
The tragedy is out of perception.
Bush administration does not seem aware of terrible distress of unemployed American worker. A naive thought, the are aware of the terrible distress and it is used for own purposes.

Terror/ high unemployment rate the ingredients, if people well conducted, for war.

You need a brutalized population to fight a war not legitimized by the world comunity.
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#14 inside bush

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Posted 28 April 2003 - 06:18 PM

tanti auguri a il amabile Berlusconi
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#15 Guest_westerby_*

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Posted 28 April 2003 - 08:21 PM

tanti auguri alla terza roma, la cara russia!

(berlusconi lasciamolo perdere...)
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#16 inside bush

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Posted 29 April 2003 - 12:20 PM

The economic and earnings calendar will be busy all week. Looking ahead, Tuesday will see the release of April Consumer Confidence and Wednesday will bring the April Chicago PMI. The week will finish off with April non-farm payrolls and unemployment rate.
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#17 pacific

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Posted 09 August 2003 - 12:03 AM

Potrebbe andare meglio, alcuni segnali sono positivi.
La percezione della situazione economica riguardo a taluni indici e ritardata.
La fiducia dei consumatori passa da un moto negativo ad uno positivo in modo lento perche' vi e' un ritardo di percezione da parte dei consumatori riguardo al periodo economico.
In una citta' in cui la crisi economica si e' fatta sentire il ripristino delle condizioni di fiducia avviene in modo piu' lento rispetto al ritorno in positivo del momento economico perche' vi e' paura e una lenta percezione del ritorno in positvo dell'economia.
La propensione al risparmio perdura anche quando un ciclo economico positivo e' cominciato perche' non vi e' la percezione della positivita' del momento nell'ambiente circostante.
Gli indici di fiducia si adeguano in ritardo al momento economico positivo e sempre dopo che tutti gli indicatori sono positivi da un po' di tempo.
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#18 pacific

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Posted 20 May 2005 - 04:52 AM

Originally posted by pacific
The PARTISAN - il PARTIGIANO
di Leonard Cohen

When they poured across the border / /Quando travolsero i confini
I was cautioned to surrender / / mi fu detto di arrendermi
this I could not do / / e questo non potevo farlo
I took my gun and vanished. / / ho preso il mio fucile e sono sparito.
I have changed my name so often / / Ho cambiato il mio nome tante volte
I've lost my wife and children / / ho perso mia moglie e i figli
but I have many friends / /ma ho molti amici
and some of them are with me. / /e alcuni di loro sono con me.
An old woman gave us shelter, / /E una donna anziana ci ha dato riparo,
kept us hidden in the garret / /ci ha nascosto in soffitta
then the soldiers came / /poi sono arrivati i soldati
she died without a whisper. / /e' morta senza un sospiro.
There were three of us this morning / /Eravamo in tre questa mattina
I'm the only one this evening / /sono rimasto solo questa sera
but I must go on / /ma devo andare avanti
the frontiers are my prison. / /le frontiere sono la mia prigione.
But the wind, the wind is blowing / /Ma il vento, il vento sta soffiando
through the graves the wind is blowing / /tra le tombe il vento sta soffiando
freedom soon will come / /la liberta' verra' presto
then we'll come from the shadows. / / allora noi usciremo dall'ombra.



:devil: :tralala: :happy: :cheers:
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