Jump to content

Theme© by Fisana
 

Photo

Angola A Key Country In West Africa


  • Please log in to reply
10 replies to this topic

#1 pacific

pacific

    Registered User

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 6441 posts

Posted 30 April 2003 - 07:06 PM

News from Angola (English)

Title: Angolan Police Officers To Be Trained In Spain
Source: ANGOP
Date: April 25, 2003
Luanda, 04/25 - Angola National Police officers will this year go to the Spanish Kingdom, to resume training courses, under the existing cooperation between the two countries.

This is one of the conclusions of the Angola/Spain 3rd Joint Bilateral meeting, held Thursday and Friday at the Home Ministry headquarters, in Luanda. According to the meeting`s final communique, the actions predicts training posts and specializations for police career in all Public Order sectors.

The parts decided to reinforce cooperation relations in the protection of civilians, penitentiary services, Immigration, the fight against narcotraffic, organised crime and and terrorism.

The next joint bilateral meeting will take place in Madrid, Spain.
  • 0

#2 pacific

pacific

    Registered User

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 6441 posts

Posted 30 April 2003 - 07:08 PM

Child Soldiers Forgotten in Angola

Human Rights Watch (Washington, DC)

April 29, 2003
Posted to the web April 29, 2003

New York

Child soldiers who fought in the Angolan civil war have been excluded from demobilization programs, Human Rights Watch said in a new report released today. April marks the one-year anniversary of the agreement that brought peace to mainland Angola in 2002.

Both the largest opposition group, National Union for the Total Independence of Angola (UNITA), and the government used child soldiers in the war. Children's rights groups have estimated that as many as 11,000 children were involved in the last years of the fighting. Some children received weapons and arms training and fought in the conflict.

Many others acted as porters, cooks, spies and laborers.

"These boys and girls have been victimized twice. First, they were robbed of their childhood as soldiers, and now they are denied access to government demobilization programs," said Tony Tate, a researcher in the Children's Rights Division of Human Rights Watch. "These children- especially girls- are being forgotten in post-conflict Angola."

One year after the conflict ended in mainland Angola, some UNITA soldiers who are 18 or older have been incorporated into the national army and police. Others were demobilized in a national program and have received needed assistance. But child soldiers, many of whom performed the same duties as adults, were denied these benefits.

The use of children in armed conflict is in violation of Angolan and international law. Angola also has obligations to provide for the recovery and reintegration of all children affected by conflict.

Beyond the hardships of war, child soldiers were deprived of educational, vocational and developmental opportunities. For these reasons, child soldiers in particular need rehabilitation programs tailored to their specific experiences. Without assistance, they risk future manipulation, and are vulnerable to being taken into military service or illegal activities.

The 26-page report, Forgotten Fighters: Child Soldiers in Angola, details the hardships these children faced during the war and the abuses they suffered. UNITA soldiers regularly beat children for infractions and assigned them hazardous duties. UNITA combatants also sexually abused girls and assigned them as "wives" to soldiers.

The government armed forces also used boys in the war, although in smaller numbers than UNITA. Boys served as fighters as well as mechanics, radio operators and porters.

Since the end of the war, child soldiers have received no direct assistance and rehabilitation in contravention of Angola's treaty obligations. Some programs have been set up to assist children generally but do not target or identify child soldiers specifically.

"Existing community-based programs provide some relief but no provisions for child soldiers," said Tate. "Programs must be established that provide for their specific needs based on their experiences as soldiers in the war."

With the rainy season ending in the coming weeks, hundreds of thousands of displaced Angolans will return home. Many child soldiers currently residing in camps and transit centers will also be on the move.

Identifying these children now and tracing them to their communities may be the only way to include them in future programs.

The World Bank has recently granted U.S. $33 million to assist the government with the rehabilitation of former combatants. Human Rights Watch said a larger portion of this grant should be channeled to help child soldiers. Children who fought in the conflict must first be identified and recognized in order for any tangible assistance to reach them.

In April 2002, the war ended on the mainland after decades of fighting.

The infrastructure of the country lies in ruins with schools and health clinics destroyed and few qualified professionals to deliver services.

The success of child soldier reintegration projects will be contingent on the government's increase of funding to provide basic services to all Angolans.

During the embargo period, the report will be available online at http://docs.hrw.org/...rgo/angola0403/ with the username: 'angola' and the access-code: 'childsoldiers'.

Beginning April 29, the report will be online at: http://www.hrw.org/r...03/angola0403/.

Testimonies from Forgotten Fighters: Child Soldiers in Angola (children's names have been changed):

I was taken away in 1999 when I was thirteen-years old. At first, I was used to transport arms, supplies, and other materials. Later, I was shown how to fight. We shot with AK-47s and other weapons. I was the youngest in my troop of about seventy, children and adults. We were on the front lines and I was sick, with bouts of malaria and often not enough to eat. I was in the troop only because they captured me in the first place. This wasn't my decision.

- Manoel P., former UNITA child soldier

I was with my family, we left because of the war- the fighting came and we had to flee. I was sixteen years old. For our work, we had to carry heavy things. Mortar shells for example. There were other children in my group, we were a group of between thirty and forty children aged fourteen to sixteen. Our main job was to carry ammunition from the bases in the altura (heights) to the front lines. It was difficult work because the loads were heavy. We were often hungry and without proper clothes and sometimes it would happen that people would "disappear." - Carlos B., former UNITA child soldier

I was involved in the fighting and in the action. At first, I was used to carry goods and help make food, later I was trained to fight. At fourteen, I was the youngest boy in my unit, although there were others of fifteen and sixteen. I saw people with their arms being blown off.

- Luiz J., former UNITA child soldier

We were trained in shooting automatic weapons, like AK-47s, and shown how to use grenades. Some kids also got training in the use of missiles and anti-tank weapons. We also received some technical training on automobile repair, mechanics, and arms cleaning and repairs.

- Felipe A., former FAA child soldier

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Make allAfrica.com your home page

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Top | Site Fran?ais | Site Guide | Who We Are | Advertising
  • 0

#3 TDPushkin

TDPushkin

    Registered User

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 11383 posts

Posted 22 August 2004 - 01:17 PM

What happened to portugal for angola to train in spain.

What happened to Russia or US, the language and cultural difference is not that different as to that of spain.

Russia is the hardware supplier of choice.

Jokingly:
The CIA has a lot of experience on training for sabotage of rail roads, elected village and district officials murdering, burning forests, posoning waters in support and leadership of UNITA.
  • 0

#4 EZland

EZland

    Registered User

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 12346 posts

Posted 22 August 2004 - 06:04 PM

TD size matters....
But most nations from Europe has some interests in African (so called Nations) even Brazil has a big foot there...
  • 0

#5 Shilka

Shilka

    Registered User

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 20852 posts

Posted 22 August 2004 - 06:38 PM

Originally posted by TDPushkin
Jokingly:
The CIA has a lot of experience on training for sabotage of rail roads, elected village and district officials murdering, burning forests, posoning waters in support and leadership of UNITA.



It's not a joke - some of it is quite true!

CIA first backed the Holden Roberto's FNLA. They got the South Africans to play mercenary for them after the Portuguese packed up around 1975.

After a while it became evident the FNLA weren't much use, and UNITA became the opposition party of choice.

At first the South Africans and UNITA weren't too happy about working together against the Angolan MPLA and the Cubans and Russians, because UNITA was an ally of SWAPO, the Namibian independance movement who was causing trouble for the South Africans in Namibia.

UNITA was eventually persuaded to stop supporting SWAPO by the SA's.
  • 0

#6 EZland

EZland

    Registered User

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 12346 posts

Posted 22 August 2004 - 06:58 PM

TD: USSR tried to change Angolans mentality whitout sucess...
They invested a lot there no results.. Cuba also...
btw: Angola (less war of course) was preety advanced and openminded in comparison to Portugal: Coka-Cola was selled there while here was forbiden.
what Portugal can preserve there is cultural ties and the language... preety sucesfull doing it with a great help of the Brazil giant.
  • 0

#7 TDPushkin

TDPushkin

    Registered User

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 11383 posts

Posted 22 August 2004 - 09:01 PM

_____________________________

But most nations from Europe has some interests in African (so called Nations) even Brazil has a big foot there..

_______________________________

In this case Brazil makes a lot of sense, they are portuguese.

What I couldn't understand was why spain.

Angola was a portugues colony.
  • 0

#8 TDPushkin

TDPushkin

    Registered User

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 11383 posts

Posted 22 August 2004 - 09:07 PM

EZLand,

_______________________
Coka-Cola was selled there while here was forbiden.
_______________________

Are there a lot of arabs with trading posts there to forbid CoKacola?


You should have seen the surprise at the American soldiers when they took Cokacola to saudi arabia during gulf war I.

Most of them had no idea that cokacola is forbidden in saudi arabia, but they quickly shut the saudis up. That was comical. The saudis trying to deprive their defenders of their official drink of the great wars.
  • 0

#9 pacific

pacific

    Registered User

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 6441 posts

Posted 22 August 2004 - 09:57 PM

Originally posted by azov
If South Africa had not invaded the country in 1975, and the US subsidized Jonas Savimbi's pointless civil war, there would have been no Cubans there, and Angola would be a quite different place.


Yeah with a war also today.

Attached Thumbnails

  • 52064737.jpg

  • 0

#10 Shilka

Shilka

    Registered User

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 20852 posts

Posted 23 August 2004 - 12:29 AM

Originally posted by azov
If South Africa had not invaded the country in 1975, and the US subsidized Jonas Savimbi's pointless civil war, there would have been no Cubans there, and Angola would be a quite different place.



I apologise on behalf of my idiot countrymen for that episode. They got s u ckered into the Angolan misadventure by the Yanks who were "fighting the spread of Communism".

Damn Yanks then left us hanging out to dry by ourselves with no logistical support, all the time facing more and more better armed and equipped Cubans and Russians.


Keep in mind that things were a little more complicated than you describe Azov.

All the time, US Oil Companies like Chevron were still doing roaring trade in Angola. The MPLA govt then used the US money they earned from oil sales to finance their Soviet weapons purchases :)

UNITA, on the other hand, made most of their $$$ by smuggling diamonds and upsetting De Beers. :D
  • 0

#11 Shilka

Shilka

    Registered User

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 20852 posts

Posted 23 August 2004 - 03:27 AM

Originally posted by azov
But the SADF went into Angola, to put in Holden Roberto's group. The Cubans went in after the fact, supported Neto's MPLA, and after Roberto's death, the US/SA switched to Savimbi and UNITA.

And if that don't confuse the shite out of anyone, they don't know Africa!



Quite right - it was very confusing.

First a clandestine SADF unit went in supporting the FNLA, with support from Zaire. (CIA sweettalked dumb white Nationalist govt. into this)

After some time, the SA's realised the FNLA weren't much use, and joined their Angolan FNLA fighters and Bushmen (a nomadic people found in SA, Namibia, Botswana and Angola) with UNITA.

At that time there was a lot of bad karma all around because the Bushmen didn't trust UNITA at all and UNITA were pals with SWAPO, the Namibian guerrilla army fighting the South Africans in Namibia.

As the war escalated, the Cubans and Russians moved in. More and more SA troops were committed to counter them. It became a huge messy punch up. The SA Army did reasonably well, but due to UN sanctions, the lack of decent Anti-Aircraft batteries and fighter planes stuffed us. The Cuban Migs tortured us.

A big phuck you goes out to the USA for dropping us here, after getting us into this mess in the first place.

The SA Army made some tactical blunders and found themselves in a compromising position. It was eventually decided by all parties that the war had gone on long enough and SA, Cuba and USSR withdrew from Angola. Namibia (then known as South West Africa) became independant from South Africa.

Many of the remaining Angolan Bushmen and FNLA fighters were repatriated to SA and incorporated into the SA Defense Force.
  • 0




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Copyright © 2016 Pravda.Ru