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What would it take for Russia to be #1?


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#3061 woj1@cyberonic.

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Posted 13 June 2004 - 11:11 AM

Donq *This little, tiny story is part of a series, in which I explain to my little daughter how things work.)*
Every respectful story is crowned with happy end,; what and when will be the happy end?

Bader; *Destroy the whole of America will not bring the mexicans their rights or chinese at home. *
I think that ex Chinese president was correct saying in Harvard; *Basic rights are food and shelter and this is my 24hrs concern, not the rights of dissidents.*
I myself consider religion as intimate affair and it shouldn
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#3062 woj1@cyberonic.

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Posted 13 June 2004 - 11:51 AM

Bader; *Norwegian rightwing party leader Jan Simonsen, has nominated Bush ( I think this included blair) for a nobel peace prize, for toppling Hussein and reducing the threat of WMD!*



I haven
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#3063 woj1@cyberonic.

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Posted 14 June 2004 - 01:44 AM

Bader; Unfortunately Lepper
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#3064 Bader

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Posted 14 June 2004 - 07:08 AM

My observation is that human rights is a european concept that
has never had the same meaning in most of the rest of the world.
While lipservice has been paid to it for the purpose of attracting loans and public image in the days of the big tourist dollar it has no cultural base in much of Africa and Asia. An
individual isnt worth much and the same follows in the area of justice and law and order.

So the re-interpretation/judging of history in terms of modern day
principles which didnt exist then and/or has never existed in much of the world is mischief with an alterior motive.
Similarly a people are referred to as a nation when in fact such
didnt exist but steams of a people from the same common base
that migrated across a continent. They feuded and butchered one another but latter when over-run by a more organised mass
with advanced technology and then a couple of centuries later human rights of that later time are allied backwards to create a new form of subtle racism.
Its the same down through history and many different peoples have been at the top. And quite clearly the US which has been
the strongest nation in the last half century is rotting fast. In terms of times various empires have ruled their areas of the world the US has only been there five minutes.
One thing for sure it is a good diversion from what should apply today but wont because for this to happen people have to stand up and be counted. Its easier to condemn something that happened two hundred years ago than Blair and Bush who should be behind bars in the Hague.
Can anyone imagine a motion being put to the UN general assembly to condemn the Coalition leaders and demand reparation for the crimes against humanity and the use of nuclear weapons (DU)?
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#3065 woj1@cyberonic.

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Posted 14 June 2004 - 01:09 PM

Bader; *Its easier to condemn something that happened two hundred years ago than Blair and Bush who should be behind bars in the Hague.
Can anyone imagine a motion being put to the UN general assembly to condemn the Coalition leaders and demand reparation for the crimes against humanity and the use of nuclear weapons (DU)?*


Price of rice is different everywhere so the human life;

Do you remember Soros
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#3066 woj1@cyberonic.

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Posted 14 June 2004 - 08:02 PM

sb11; *(it is time to remove the Nobel from Kissinger and Gallo)*


Alfred Nobel's established the Nobel Prizes, in 1900,
he was Swedish chemist, engineer, and industrialist who invented dynamite and other, more powerful explosives....;
it is no nobility in Nobel prize and in the most of Nobel Peace prize' recipients...:)
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#3067 woj1@cyberonic.

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Posted 15 June 2004 - 12:09 PM

*....U.S. Lawyers Use Legalisms to Cover Lawlessness:
The law ``should prevent us from falling into our base instincts,'' , it should embody ``the highest goals of humankind.''

The law did neither in the hands of civilian lawyers at the Pentagon, the Justice Department and the White House, who twisted it into pretzels to reach the astonishing conclusion that the president doesn't have to obey the law if he wants to order torture.
In classified memoranda disclosed in news reports last week, civilian administration lawyers argued that presidential power trumps federal law and international treaties forbidding torture.
Consider memo from Pentagon lawyers, available on the National Public Radio Web site. It says a soldier can legally inflict severe pain on a detainee ``if causing such harm is not his objective.''
So, if the soldier has some purpose beyond simply inflicting pain (like eliciting information, maybe?) it's okay to torture a detainee.
Where did these lawyers learn to parse words? From Bill Clinton?

As assistant attorney general in the Justice Department's Office of Legal Counsel, Jay Bybee, signed a Justice Department memo that said international anti-torture laws ``may be unconstitutional if applied to interrogations'' of overseas captives, according to the Washington Post, which obtained the memo.
Now Bybee occupies a lifetime seat on the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, thanks to Bush.
As general counsel to the Department of Defense, William Haynes II oversaw those whose memo said the president doesn't have to obey anti-torture laws.
Bush nominated Haynes to the 4th U.S Circuit Court of Appeals, although the prison abuse scandal has now put that nomination on hold.
White House Counsel Alberto Gonzales has for years been mentioned as one of Bush's favorites for a spot on the U.S. Supreme Court. In January 2002 he wrote in a memo that one of the benefits of excluding Guantanamo Bay detainees from Geneva Convention protection is that the U.S. couldn't be accused of war crimes in its treatment of them.
This is like a criminal defense lawyer telling clients that by saying they are beyond the reach of the law, they can go ahead and commit crimes.

intercepts from Ann Woolner i at awoolner@bloomberg.net.

Support for human rights?:) or Democracy?:)
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#3068 woj1@cyberonic.

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Posted 15 June 2004 - 12:24 PM

Iraq Prison Abuse Copied Guantanamo, Karpinski Says The abuse of Iraqi prisoners at Abu Ghraib jail came about with the introduction of methods used at the Guantanamo Bay detention camp in Cuba that treated detainees ``like dogs,'' Brigadier General Janis Karpinski said in an interview with the BBC.
The 51-year-old commander was in charge of the military police that ran the Baghdad prison when the abuse scandal erupted in April with the publication of photographs showing Iraqi detainees stripped naked being humiliated and maltreated.
Karpinski told the British Broadcasting Corp. she knew nothing of the abuse because military intelligence took over part of the Iraqi prison to make the interrogations more like ``Gitmo,'' the nickname for Guantanamo. She cited some comments about how to treat prisoners that she said the current Iraqi prison chief Major General Geoffrey Miller, formerly in charge of Guantanamo, told her.
A U.S. general investigating the abuse has put the blame on the soldiers and so far has found no evidence of a policy..
The U.S. Naval Base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba,
Beth O'Connell at boconnell@bloomberg.net.

Good example of human rights and democracy for Fidel Castro:)
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#3069 woj1@cyberonic.

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Posted 15 June 2004 - 01:55 PM

Two hot air statements;

War on Iraq is last on earth and peace will last forever- . Subject is finished and nothing to add.

WWIII will be soon.

It will start with attack on Iran ;
Outcome;
Germany will be concern because its oil shortage?
Russia will be concern because money spent on Iran nuclear energy system?
China will enclosed on Taiwan ?
North Korea will fuse with the South Korea?

It looks like it might be the great fun. :)
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#3070 woj1@cyberonic.

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Posted 15 June 2004 - 04:25 PM

Bader; Walesa praises the Wild West,/ Donq; oil breeds injustice

We don
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#3071 Bader

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Posted 16 June 2004 - 01:01 AM

Well put Woj:
The developed world represents the most developed in terms of debt control, the most useful for the internationalists who own them through debt.

The law does prepresent the base instincts of those who control the money (who thus control the law makers) except when it punishes those who dont have much money. Your price of rice applies here just as well. The only level playing field is over mass graves.

Torture inside and outside the US is a matter of legal semantics and conjecture. The media talks about what is just talked about
and so we watch the magicians eyes while his hands go undetected and unimpeded. There is no right and no wrong,
just different dispositions and conjecture entertain while the
internationalists plod on with their goals. Nothing is planned,
its all just happenstance, power doesnt corrupt only global warming does. Remember it was sunspots that caused the great depression!

Soldiers are to blame is not what was acceptable fifty years ago
at the end of the war. Price of rice is not consistent. Rumsfeld
is the man.

An invasion of Iran will mean nuclear war. The British had a nuclear missle sub on standby when the US went into Iraq. The US must have had their own. Russia wont let Iran be taken, it will be WW3 if they try. But we might see limited strategic strikes against certain targets.
One issue that needs thinking through is the fact that much of the US military and National Guard are going to be sick and dying in a few short years, compulsary service and duty in Iraq will
extend that terminal cancer nation wide. This is a thousand time worse than Russias price over Afghanistan.
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#3072 woj1@cyberonic.

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Posted 16 June 2004 - 11:10 AM

*On not being American
It is a privilege not to be hated for your nationality, and we should not relinquish it lightly
In Baghdad, every encounter we had was a bit like going through customs.
"American?" was the inevitable first question.
"No, no, Canadian," our over-eager reply.
Don't get me wrong: Canadians aren't loved in Iraq; we just aren't, so far as I could tell, actively loathed.
I was in Iraq in April, at a pivotal moment when the United States decided to wage two pre-emptive wars within a pre-emptive war, one against the resistance in Fallujah, the other against Muqtada al-Sadr in Najaf and Sadr City. The Los Angeles Times estimates that 800 Iraqis have been killed in the past nine weeks of U.S. attacks on Sadr City, even more than the 600 estimated to have died in the siege on Fallujah.
As mosques were desecrated, prisoners tortured and children killed, I witnessed George Bush's awesome enemy-manufacturing machine up close. Hatred of Americans soared, not just in Iraq but also in neighbouring countries.
The retaliation began immediately: a wave of kidnappings of foreigners, now so common they barely make the news. The change in mood was palpable.
Anti-Americanism was no longer a sentiment; it was an uncontrollable force of nature. Being Canadian didn't let us off the hook; but the overwhelming majority of Iraqis I met -- even, miraculously, those who had just lost children and spouses to U.S. weapons -- were profoundly grateful for that reprieve, relieved not to have to hate. I, of course, was even more grateful, since being not-American kept me out of serious danger more than once.
It is a privilege not to be hated for your nationality, and we should not relinquish it lightly. George Bush has denied that privilege to his own people, and Stephen Harper would cavalierly strip it from Canadians by erasing what few small but important differences remain between Canadian and U.S. foreign policy. The danger posed by this act is not just about whether Canadians are safe when we travel to the Middle East. The hatred that Mr. Bush is manufacturing there, for the United States and its coalition partners, is already following the soldiers home.
I have felt that hatred in Iraq, and trust me: We don't want to experience it here in Canada. Or don't trust me, trust the citizens of Spain, who decided in their March elections that they are not willing to accept the blowback from George Bush's wars, that they don't want these multiplying enemies to be their enemies too. Or the citizens of the United Kingdom, who just battered Tony Blair's Labour Party in last week's local elections, furious at being dragged into a war that has made them less safe. Or the citizens of Australia, who are about to send the same message to John Howard. Or even the citizens of the United States., Yet just as the rest of the world is finally saying "no more," Canadians are poised to elect a party that is saying "me too."
The truth is that around the world, it is blind government complicity with U.S. foreign policy, precisely the kind of complicity advocated by Mr. Harper, that is putting civilians in the line of terror. It is the United States that is the weak link.
Before I went to Iraq, a seasoned war correspondent who had spent a year reporting from Baghdad gave me his best piece of security advice. "Stay away from Americans, they're bad for your health." He wasn't being anti-American (he's an American citizen and supported the war); he was just being practical. In Iraq, that advice means you don't want to ride in the U.S. convoys or embed with U.S. troops. You keep your distance and stay independent. At this perilous moment in history, the same principle applies at home: Canadian security depends on our ability to maintain meaningful sovereignty from the United States. Being inside the U.S. security fortress isn't a missile shield, it's a missile magnet.
As long as the United States continues to act as a global aggressor, the best way for us to stay healthy is to stay as far away as from Americans as possible.
http://www.globeandm...O15/Comment/Idx
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#3073 woj1@cyberonic.

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Posted 16 June 2004 - 12:47 PM

One is a former pig farmer, the other a well-educated lawyer. Together the leaders of Poland's two biggest Eurosceptic parties have helped deliver one of the biggest electoral setbacks ever suffered by EU leaders.
Less than 21 of population of Poland participated in voting and in Slovakia 17%. In Poland, meanwhile, two anti-EU parties, the Self Defense party of the far-right populist Andrzej Lepper and the League of Polish Families, together won 29 percent .
BTW Slovakia, has a new premier whom US doesn
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#3074 woj1@cyberonic.

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Posted 16 June 2004 - 01:21 PM

Bader; * debt control, the most useful for the internationalists who own them through debt.*
1; by controlling standing of currency
2. controlling the inflation
The most dramatic situation in Poland will be caused by the inflation rate. In moment of entry on May 1 to European Union, Polish prices which were lower than in EU starts leveling with union markets and increasing dramatically. Of course it was mentioned before entry but government objected this eventuality.
Polish Reserve System run by IMF agents says that they see inflation and they preparing to the rates increase.
It would help IMF banks to get the better profit and ruin the Poland. The leader of Polish Reserve System is Balcerowicz the member Freedom party as is Geremek, the Media potential Leader of Polish Group in Brussels . Balcerowicz is also member of no existing in Congress Freedom party and is running Polish securities and Polish economy and he is making MIF rich on Polish cost.
IMF called it the *democracy*
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#3075 woj1@cyberonic.

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Posted 16 June 2004 - 01:48 PM

Should the U.S. give the Iraqis custody of Saddam Hussein by June 30?
Yes 455 votes (43%)
No 611 votes (57%)

http://discussions.w...e=1&submit=Vote

Americans love fredom but only for themselves.
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#3076 woj1@cyberonic.

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Posted 16 June 2004 - 07:07 PM

Black Helicopter Theories Whir Through Markets:
It must say something about fear and greed that normally sane people take leave of their senses to construct financial market conspiracy theories.
(CT) making the rounds concerns the surge in money supply growth and -- watch the web being spun -- the implication that ``the Fed must know something.''
According to this line of thinking, the Federal Reserve is flooding the banking system with reserves in the same way that it did following the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks -- except this time it's anticipating the event.
Two weeks ago, Safehaven.com posted an alarming analysis on its Web site, warning of the ``unprecedented, unheard-of pre- catastrophe M3 expansion'' M3, the broadest monetary aggregate, rose $154 billion, or 22 percent annualized, from mid-April to mid-May. a crisis of historic proportions coming, and the Federal Reserve is making sure that there is enough liquidity in place to protect our nation's fragile financial system.''
``The Fed's actions mean they know what is about to happen,'' the posting went on. ``They are aware of a terrible, horrific imminent event.''
Is the Fed just acting irresponsibly? No, the author concluded, this isn't your garden-variety central bank printing party. ``Something is up, bigger than we have ever seen in the history of the United States.''
`Plunge Protection Team'' ignore when they assert that the Fed, Treasury and a cabal of large investment banks step in to buy S&P futures contracts whenever the stock market is going into one of its swan dives.
The Fed doesn't have a slush fund (don't tell the conspiracy theorists). The central bank creates reserves out of thin air. If it were secretly buying stock index futures -- how secret could it be with someone executing and clearing the trades? -- there would be a reserve impact. The Fed would have to drain reserves, internally or through open market operations, to keep the funds rate steady.
The other CT being promulgated right now has to do with activity in the Chicago Merc's one-month Libor futures contract, which is hardly the vehicle of choice for speculating on short- term interest-rate movements. The contracts have 633,890 in open interest compared with 6.5 million in the three-month Eurodollar futures.
The idea is that something is going to happen after August - - a September surprise? -- to cause interest rates to plunge.
With interest-rate futures markets getting increasingly bearish on expectations for higher rates going forward, these trades aren't exactly working.
Silent black choppers are supposedly being used by secret agents of the New World Order
intercepts from Caroline Baum at cabaum@bloomberg.net.
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#3077 woj1@cyberonic.

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Posted 16 June 2004 - 08:08 PM

Bader; *An invasion of Iran will mean nuclear war. The British had a nuclear missle sub on standby when the US went into Iraq. The US must have had their own. Russia wont let Iran be taken, it will be WW3 if they try. But we might see limited strategic strikes against certain targets.
One issue that needs thinking through is the fact that much of the US military and National Guard are going to be sick and dying in a few short years, compulsary service and duty in Iraq will
extend that terminal cancer nation wide. This is a thousand time worse than Russias price over Afghanistan.*

Russians problem from Afghanistan was mainly drugs. It is not particularly Russian problem today. One says that drug addiction is related to genetic material.
Radiation is maybe funny, as a joke about Ukrainian borsch illuminating at Christmas table , but less as a 130 thousand the members of military glowing in darkness of Mesopotamia desert. Bush might be excused that he wasn
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#3078 Bader

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Posted 17 June 2004 - 06:30 AM

Howdy Woj:

The IMF is a bank and their business is to make profits, so they will restructure economies to make profits for themselves and thus they sustain a virtual monopolistic control over the
"market". You cant get a better business than that.

FMI: for monetary independance- to restructure the economy
so the nation has the monopoly on the benefits of their economy.

I see in Britain there is UK independant party- that wants to reverse out of the UE, which did well out of the recent elections.
Probably not a likely anticipated outcome of the Bush Crusade.

"....normally sane people take leave of their senses to construct conspiracy theories.." These are the tied lazy media minions who
to defend themselves against being left behind by the public,
their audience, have to make a conspiracy that there is no conspiracy.
To say the banks dont have a slush fund and to try and make
claims that banks print money look daft shows the ignorance
and stupidity of that journalist. Banks do print money as any senior educational textbook will explain and thus they didnt need
a slush fund. So can we rely on his discretion as whether there are or arent conspiracies.
I would like to make the point- a conspiracy is a plan to commit a
crime. Commiting the crime isnt a plan, its way past that stage,
meaning a crime in progress isnt a conpiracy anymore.

Nuclear armed subs in Sth Atlanic re Falklands war. Did you expect them to sale back to england and unload them and then go down into the area? Can you think of any reason they might have had to use them against Argentina? I can think of reasons their other weapons might have been called upon.
Regardless of whom the oil resources come under do you think it matters, the british are no freer than the argies, in fact they might be more reliable to be compliant.
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#3079 donquijote

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Posted 17 June 2004 - 06:32 AM

<Same in Poland, Lepper will do more for the locals than the Walsea-Reagan-Pope could.>

Howdy Bader
I've been away from the jungle again, but I'm back.

Out of the three you mention one is a lion with clear features, though much inclined to showmanship. The other two are rather dressed in sheep's clothing, but you can see the way they colaborate with the big lion, and then you draw your own conclusions...;)

<The symptoms of the lion are everywhere and his servants are everywhere, in all races and cultures. As long as the groups of little animals blame each other the jungle becomes more than just a jungle.>

Right, lions are born everywhere, and in fact many lions use the nationality issue to disguise themselves as "friend" of the little animals.

<n tv the other night, a mechanic had his car running on home brewed alcohol which ran more efficient than petrol. Others have run their deisel cars on cooking fat used in takewaway food outlets with a little acohol mixed in it and again got bigger mileage out of it. No loss of power in either case as well.
Apparantly the dairy comp. is researching the use of dairy products - run cars on unseperated cream-animal fat?
See what can happen when people stop thinking through lionsville minds.>

Presidents are chosen nowdays mostly by multinationals, then voted in by the little people. They are experts though at hiding the former while emphasizing the latter. Of course, if these inventors didn't chip in big time toward the election they ain't going very far with their inventions. It's a simple fact of life in the jungle...;)

<he world (humanity) in the main is in the material dimension just like people in a religious dimension trapped by a religious cult. No difference between trusting the witch doctors and the bankers/corporate kings.>

What moves the jungle is...MONEY. Even if it amounts to risking your life, even if it amounts to a world catastrophe...:(

"The rewards are very, very high," he said. "You land one small contract, you might walk away with $500,000, $600,000."

Profit Opportunities Lure Business to Iraq
By MATTHEW BARAKAT, AP Business Writer

ARLINGTON, Va. - The risks are undeniable, but for entrepreneurs pondering contracting work in Iraq (news - web sites), the potential financial rewards outweigh the dangers.

A small-business conference here Wednesday encouraged business owners and others to find subcontracting opportunities in Iraq with major multinational corporations like Halliburton and Bechtel, which have collectively locked up billions of dollars in government contracts to restore Iraqi infrastructure and modernize the economy.

The dangers of working in Iraq have been splashed across the front pages for months. No case was more shocking than that of Nicholas Berg, who was beheaded last month in Iraq and attended a very similar conference in December in Arlington before going to Iraq.

Basel Hijjawi, an Alexandria resident with experience in engineering and finance who speaks 30 different dialects of Arabic, has no illusions about the potential dangers. He was born in Saudi Arabia, grew up in Jordan, and has traveled throughout the Middle East and is familiar with the sounds of mortar shells.

"I speak the language, but I don't look like them, so right away I know I'm a target," said Hijjawi, who inherited his fair skin from his Russian mother. "But I grew up in an area where you did not know what might happen to you from one day to the next. ... You take precautions, but if something's going to happen, something's going to happen."

The opportunities that exist for somebody with strong technical and language skills are phenomenal, he said.

"The rewards are very, very high," he said. "You land one small contract, you might walk away with $500,000, $600,000."

A truck driver who earns $30,000 to $40,000 a year in the states might make nearly $100,000 doing the same work in Iraq.

The big companies that spoke at the conference did not sugarcoat the situation. George Sigalos, director of government relations for Halliburton-KBR, said about 40 of the company's employees have died in Iraq since the war began.

http://story.news.ya...d=540&ncid=1480
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#3080 donquijote

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Posted 17 June 2004 - 06:42 AM

*This little, tiny story is part of a series, in which I explain to my little daughter how things work.)*
<Every respectful story is crowned with happy end,; what and when will be the happy end?>

Howdy Woj
Happy ending is necessary to keep the rule of the King of the Jungle. This is what he says to the kids: "The good guys always win. Of course, I'm one of them...":confused: Our kids are being lied to as we write. And we must reach 'em before it's too late...;)

<Although Walesa received in last presidential election less than 1% of support he again intends to run.
He should be satisfied the role as a funeral guest, he has many yet funerals to attend; Margaret Thatcher, Pope, Gorbachev, Jeltsin, cardinal Glemp etc. he should take enough satisfaction from that, finally , we don-t expect too much from Nobel prize recipients lately-.>

I wonder about his comments on Polish losses in Iraq...;)
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