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What would it take for Russia to be #1?


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#4421 woj1@cyberonic.

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Posted 23 November 2004 - 07:38 PM

Originally posted by Bader

.....but value of dollar.


Russia May Boost Euro Reserves
.
``Most of our reserves are in dollars, and that's a cause for concern, The dollar has lost 7 percent against the European common currency in the past three months.
``As the dollar falls, I would expect that this will become even more widespread and there will be more central banks using the euro as a major reserve currency,''
'' A dollar decline to 100 yen within a month is ``in the cards,''

mtannen@bloomberg.net.

Chess is two sides game.
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#4422 Bader

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Posted 23 November 2004 - 11:01 PM

The Chess board is the Board of the BIS ( Bank of International Settlements) this is their territory.

What Alan Greenspan has to say is not as important as what the
Director of the Board has to say. What the Central banks do in relation to the Dollar is decided at the BIS- the international central bank of central banks, yet it is invisible. The media dont consult it, yet it is logical they should.
Thus all the focus is at the national level and yet nationalism is phoney because the banking system rules over the govts.
Its against this background WOj you have to understand why Poland and its leaders are as they are.

A debt money system has to keep on expanding the money supply and this means it becomes a bubble, so its colateral base has to expand as well which is why the nations are taken over,
including by war as in Jugoslavia and now Russia is under attack to shrink her. The purpose is to expose the resourses and take them off govt/national control, to grow the colateral base of the world debt money system.
But even then the world materially is finite so at some time even if all the natural resourses of the world (and prices) are controlled one globalregimes the debt money system cant keep on growing, the bubble will burst.
So you can see why the earth summit plans are intending to wind down industry and the population and create a phoney sustainable dictatorship because the present system will eventually implode. The environmental scares are to make it look natural to save the planet and all life. Its to save the elites
chess game from ending.
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#4423 donquijote

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Posted 24 November 2004 - 01:54 AM

> > So... you've missed the point. People typically feel somewhat
> > threatened by the homeless, yet they have free rein of the place.
> > People do *not* typically feel threatened by sea kayakers, yet
> > they're prohibited. This makes no sense. It's not an issue of
> > "play."
>
> You've missed *my* point. The OP was expressing his dissatisfaction with
> being marginalized by society. He feels that he is being oppressed by the
> LAW OF THE JUNGLE, by which the mightier creatures, those driving cars and
> motorboats, backed by money and the law, are keeping him from pursuing his
> innocent interests.

You put it so well...

He also has a holier-than-thou attitude towards those
> making use of polluting forms of transportation/recreation. In the same
> sentences he tries to marginalize the homeless in the exact same way, on
> the same flimsy pretexts, using the same laws of the land, and completely
> ignores the environmental impact of his owning a home (not insignificant).

OK, I have a small apartment, with open windows--not A/C--for ventilation. I wished I could do more. I propose coops for sharing things like automobiles, but that's when we get rid of the dinosaur... ;)

>
> I was not arguing that the homeless are more fun to have around than
> kayakers, or safer, or anything like that. I was pointing out a glaring
> double standard in the OP. This kind of hypocrisy upsets me, like the
> person who will gladly steal from a big corporation (it's not like they
> need the money, piracy is a victimless crime) but refuses to give to the
> needy (why should they get handouts from MY pocket?). In the end, his
> arguments boil down to a very selfish demand for respect, and respect is
> not something he's willing to give in return.

Oh no, how about the respect society deserves? You think you can share something with an individual that hasn't taken a shower for 3 months and who can go into a frenzy any minute?

You know this people should be helped to help themselves, not fed and then allowed to roam around. And that happens because they don't hang out where those responsible live. The jungle is abandoned to their fate... :(
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#4424 donquijote

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Posted 24 November 2004 - 01:57 AM

Western media denounces foul play in Ukranian elections, but says American elections are fair.

Prostitution may be the oldest profession but not the best compensated...;)
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#4425 woj1@cyberonic.

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Posted 24 November 2004 - 01:57 PM

Originally posted by Bader
The Chess board is the Board of the BIS ( Bank of International Settlements) this is their territory.

So you can see why the earth summit plans are intending to wind down industry and the population and create a phoney sustainable dictatorship because the present system will eventually implode. The environmental scares are to make it look natural to save the planet and all life. Its to save the elites
chess game from ending.


Czechoslovakia was first breaking apart, with Havel help.
Next was Mrs. Albright/Clinton butchery and assassination of Yugoslavia .
Now Ukraine is under attack.
But it could bring good future for Crimea with Odessa, that they will be back to Russian motherland . So breaking the Ukraine might not be so happy case for Slavs enemies. Nationalist of Juszczenko is not phoney .
Juszczenko on West Ukraine might be a new Ukrainian bin Laden.
Difference maybe only one; the free dollar fall.

Enemy of Slavs try to eliminate Slavs intelligence and brainpower and grow vegy- Slavs in kibbutz.
Waiting with full stomach and peace on aging...
Solution is only one; remove all Slavic enemies from Slavic countries so they wouldn
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#4426 donquijote

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Posted 24 November 2004 - 02:13 PM

Woj, I got a question for you...

Where's British Democracy?;)

http://engforum.prav...919#post1154919
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#4427 donquijote

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Posted 24 November 2004 - 02:18 PM

Originally posted by woj1@cyberonic.
Solution is only one; remove all Slavic enemies from Slavic countries so they wouldn-t be able to close us in kibbutz.



Kibbutz is the free people in the free group. No predators there, and no jungle there.

But if you want to live in chicken coups run by foxes, so be it...;)
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#4428 woj1@cyberonic.

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Posted 24 November 2004 - 03:10 PM

Originally posted by donquijote
Woj, I got a question for you...


I have an answer for you;
Since today, we Slavs will follow the US doctrine; either Slavs win, or the elections do not correspond to (democratic) standards, were falsified or were undemocratic,"
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#4429 donquijote

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Posted 24 November 2004 - 03:16 PM

Originally posted by woj1@cyberonic.
I have an answer for you;
Since today, we Slavs will follow the US doctrine; either Slavs win, or the elections do not correspond to (democratic) standards, were falsified or were undemocratic,"



That's a deal. If your people win, then it is fair elections; if they lose, you cry foul...;)

You just got a hang of DEMO-CRISY.:cool:
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#4430 donquijote

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Posted 24 November 2004 - 03:43 PM

"Voting for representatives began with the Romans as a way of suppressing democracy. Thus an element of democracy was introduced, while true power remained within the ruling class"

The myth of modern democracy

Far from being proof of our political emancipation, our right to vote in parliamentary elections is a symbol of power that keeps us powerless.

by Ivo Mosley

Although we assume that British democracy is modelled on the ancient Greek system, there are essential differences. The ancient Greeks did not vote for representatives. The 500-member governing council of Athens and most of the officials were chosen by lot, much as a jury is selected in modern Britain. The terms served were short: council members served for one year and could not serve more than two terms. Athens was small: the total number of citizens probably never reached 50,000. By the time they died, most citizens had held political office of some kind at least once.

The council coordinated the state and prepared proposals (changes in the law, declarations of war, and so forth) for the general assembly. Any citizen could attend the assembly, which met on roughly 40 days spaced throughout the year. Final decisions were taken there by votes cast directly on each proposal, after speeches for and against.

Classical historian Moses Finley defends ancient Greek politics against two camps of critics: elitists, for whom it was too democratic; and anti-elitists, for whom it was not democratic enough (because women and slaves did not have citizenship). For Finley, it was democracy of an extremely direct kind, one that has not been tried since.

Voting for representatives began with the Romans as a way of suppressing democracy. The common people were allowed, after much agitation, to elect people to represent their interests, but the candidates had to come from the ruling senatorial class and voting was weighted in favour of the rich. Thus an element of democracy was introduced, while true power remained within the ruling class.

Along with political representation came the kind of long-term political alliances that would later be recognised as political parties. The practical realities of electing representatives once every few years meant that voters had to vote for a whole raft of interests; in other words, for a political programme. Politicians were identified by which faction they belonged to, usually based on which class they promised to represent.

When democracy started making inroads into the European political scene more than 1,000 years later it imitated the Roman model, but with a significant difference. Voting itself was restricted by property and/or rank. In the UK the widening of the franchise in the 19th century eventually led to the formation of the Labour Party. It also had a class-based agenda: the redistribution of wealth. Now, more than a century later, we are left in an anomalous situation. The old ruling class has been disempowered, but our system of democracy was actually designed to keep power with a ruling class. As a result, a ruling class is continually created out of those who can work the system to their advantage. We live in an illusion of democracy.

There are periodic flurries of discussion about how we could improve democracy, but only recently have people begun to discuss whether it might be a good idea to incorporate an element of Greek democracy in our modern system. Would it be an improvement, for instance, if the House of Commons was chosen by lot, replacing professional lifer' politicians with ordinary people? This is the central suggestion in Keith Sutherlands new book The Party's Over.

The 'jury', Sutherland suggests, should be drawn from ordinary people with a minimum age qualification (he suggests 30). There could, of course, be other requirements - perhaps to undergo a basic course of study in political history, akin to taking a driving test. He suggests that the Upper House should consist of life peers chosen by Parliament for their experience, achievements or service, and that these 'Lords Advocate' be responsible for preparing and presenting business to the Commons, and for presenting opposing arguments. The administrative side of government (ministers and so forth) would be appointed by a bureaucracy attached nominally to the Crown but acting in accordance with the wishes of Parliament. Ministers could be removed, and policies reversed, by a simple vote of no confidence.

One can only speculate on whether such juries would approve the panoply of madnesses, great and small, that plagues the modern world. It may be the case that Western 'democracies' are too entrenched, psychologically and structurally, to change. We are used to thinking that our single vote once every few years is the one true sign that we live in a democracy. Without it, what power would we have? The irony is, the vote is a symbol of power that keeps us powerless. It is an illusion: it keeps us from looking at how we might really participate and determine our own destiny, rather than drift helplessly in the power of those most unscrupulous and unsavoury characters - politicians and chief executives. To adapt a phrase from Karl Marx, 'voting is the opium of the people'.

http://democracy.mko...t/DDmosley.html
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#4431 woj1@cyberonic.

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Posted 24 November 2004 - 06:37 PM

Originally posted by donquijote
"Voting for representatives began with the Romans as a way of suppressing democracy. Thus an element of democracy was introduced, while true power remained within the ruling class"



But I see world differently and more optimistic; for example;

Secretary of State Colin Powell said Wednesday the United States did not accept the results of the disputed presidential election in Ukraine as legitimate and called for immediate action. http://story.news.ya..._powell_dc&e=1B

RASILIA, Nov. 24 (Xinhuanet) -- Brazil will start enriching uranium next month with the approval of the International Atomic Energy Agency

http://www.xinhuanet...glish/index.htm
End the monopoly.:)
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#4432 donquijote

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Posted 24 November 2004 - 06:45 PM

> Yeah, and you can bet your *** that if they could get on Al-Jazeera, they
> would take the last Dinar, or whatever currency they use in Iraq, to do the
> work of the "lord'. I get a real hoot out of that greasy haired man with
> the handlebar mustache, and the bouffant pink haired hooker looking bitch
> that Amens him, all the time.
>
> --

What do you think of instituting a National 'No Rip-Off Day'? Or should it be international?;)

National 'No Rip-Off Day'
by A.H. "Pug" Jones

Today's advertising, television evangelism, politics, news reporting, and retailing are so sophisticated and high tech that consumers, watchers, believers, and readers can hardly tell when or how they are cheated. If a dastardly deed is discovered, little can be done. Often, it is a small thing, hardly worth getting upset about. It may make the cheated person feel foolish, even to complain about it. Consequently, many people feel angry at someone or about something most of the time.

Consider a package of bacon. No matter how carefully you examine it, the pieces that show are always leaner than the rest. If you buy a bunch of radishes there's at least one or more, that are inedible. A package of pork chops is perfect except for the chop under the price tag. It has a big strip of bone and gristle through it. Are substandard chops set aside, so packagers can put one under each tag? Why are the biggest and ripest strawberries always on top of the package and the mushy or whitish/green ones on the bottom.

In jewelry ads, microscopic disclaimers note that gems and rings are smaller than the pictures. Duh! Magazine subscriptions state how much is saved over news stand prices --though those stands must be in Tokyo or Geneva-- but not where we shop. Sale prices often compare a $2.96 item with another at $6.95. Have you ever been able to find who sells the $6.95 item?

The scariest things are new inventions or goods that cost $19.99 to $29.95 with a $4.95 to $6.95 shipping charge. Maybe at $19.99 price you would be paying only twice the cost of a vegetable cutter --two tubes of spot remover-- or a self-wringing mop. When you add shipping costs, the item costs two or three times as much. Here's the real deal--the product's shipping charge is the actual cost of the product. Even if you return it, they don't lose and you have paid the shipping both ways. Is that a rip-off or what?

There are stock investment magazines, real estate tapes, exercise equipment for body parts you'd rather forget and psychics, who tell you how to make important life decisions. Of course your first call or demo video is free. They ship the second magazine, tape or piece of equipment just one day after the free one is sent. You owe money before you've inspected the freebie.

The best time to see "truth" in politics is during a presidential election year when everyone promises everything to everyone else. Does any politican tell the truth ... about anything? Do any of them credit voters with the intelligence to figure out what is truthful and what isn't?

News reporters do report facts, but often use statistics and quotes that distort the actual meaning of any fact. Statisticians who compile survey results can take a set of figures and make them prove something, conclusively. Then taking the same set of figures, someone else can prove the exact opposite of the original premise. Wow!

What if your phone rang on Tuesday evening during dinner and a voice said, "Good evening, Mr. Smith. I am a professional telephone fund-raiser. The Smoky Bear Fire Department hired me to see how much money I could collect. They want to give a Smoky Bear party for 15 disadvantaged kids to tell them about fire dangers. By law, we must tell you that 97% of the collections go directly to our company. The company pays me a healthy fee for each donation that I coerce from you. Now how much would you like to donate to the Smoky Bear Fire Department (or The Sheriff's Donkey Posse or The Lifeguard's Award to the person with the best tan)? This truth would hardly make you run for your checkbook, would it?

Perhaps it's time for a National No rip-off Day, when every person selling, advertising, politicking, preaching, promising, or writing about something in exchange for money or a vote would have to tell the truth, preferably face-to-face.

Of course, the National No-Rip-Off Day will have to be postponed until after November.

http://www.hsvvoice....03/0611/Column/

http://committed.to/justiceforpeace
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#4433 woj1@cyberonic.

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Posted 24 November 2004 - 06:51 PM

Originally posted by donquijote

Perhaps it-s time for a National No rip-off Day, when every person selling, advertising, politicking, preaching, promising, or writing about something in exchange for money or a vote would have to tell the truth, preferably face-to-face.




Quick Vote

How much do you expect U.S. Dollar to depreciate by the end of 2004?

a. 5 percent- 70.59%
b. 3 percent- 14.29%
c. 2 percent- 15.13


http://www.xinhuanet...glish/index.htm
:)
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#4434 donquijote

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Posted 24 November 2004 - 07:08 PM

Originally posted by woj1@cyberonic.
Quick Vote

How much do you expect U.S. Dollar to depreciate by the end of 2004?

a. 5 percent- 70.59%
b. 3 percent- 14.29%
c. 2 percent- 15.13


http://www.xinhuanet...glish/index.htm
:)



OK, Woj, don't forget to vote...;)

National 'No Rip-Off Day'?

http://engforum.prav...threadid=107071
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#4435 woj1@cyberonic.

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Posted 25 November 2004 - 07:10 AM

[QUOTE]Originally posted by Bader
The Chess board is the Board of the BIS ( Bank of International Settlements) this is their territory.

So you can see why the earth summit plans are intending to wind down industry and the population and create a phoney sustainable dictatorship because the present system will eventually implode. The environmental scares are to make it look natural to save the planet and all life. Its to save the elites
chess game from ending. /QUOTE]

Saddam prophecy
The Dora refinery on the edge of Baghdad has been ravaged by rust. The crude distillation units are 60 years old. Damage from U.S. bombing in the 1991 Gulf War is still evident, and mortar rounds land almost daily.
Iraq has s rusty refineries, sabotage and fuel shortages. Saddam Hussein bought loyalty with his oil money, creating a strong dependency culture in which a generation of Iraqis grew up expecting the state to find them jobs.
Iraq had a first-rate education system and Baghdad University "There was a feeling of tolerance and integrity of government,".
In countries with small populations and vast natural resources Brunei the model works extremely well. The formula does not work in countries such as Algeria, Iran, Iraq, or Nigeria because the population is large.
Used some from; http://www.reuters.c...67&pageNumber=1

So you are correct; US worry that Algeria, Iran, Iraq, or Nigeria has large population
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#4436 woj1@cyberonic.

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Posted 25 November 2004 - 08:20 AM

In an address at the nationwide coordination meeting, Kuchma said Viktor Yushchenko, was planning to "resort to force -- to stage a state coup" even before the end of the presidential election.
The illegal swearing-in of Yushchenko as Ukrainian president is part of the coup,
However, Kuchma said, the situation is still totally under control, and Ukraine will not bow down before any pressure, either from outside or inside, neither will the country allow the occurrence of violence.
Yanukovich has won 49.46 percent of the vote and Yushchenko gained 46.61 percent.
. The US State Department also summoned the Russian ambassador in Washington over Moscow's early congratulations to Yanukovich . ??????????http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2004-11/25/content_2259246.htm

Should Yanukovich deal peacefully as Milosevic for what Milosevic is now in Hague prison?
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#4437 lolomarsei

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Posted 25 November 2004 - 02:05 PM

Originally posted by Rebel
How could Russia gain more power?

1) First, and foremost, cut back on military spending by, let's say, 5-10% and divert that money into a program to promote more childbearing (similar, but more aggressive, to the communist party's policies prior to Yeltzin).

2) Stop trying to immitate western hedonistic practices. Russia can't afford the pricetag of abortion-related sterility, sexually transmitted diseases like AIDS, drugs and the like. Promote spirituality. Promote nationalistic pride. Stalin used these things to save his --- in WW2 and make no mistake about it, disease and childlessness is going to decline the Russian population faster than Himmler might have dreamed of unless trends are reversed.

3) Safeguard foreign investment from organized crime. Russia needs more domestic and international business growth and it won't get what it needs unless people feel free and safe to engage in economic activity.

4) Clean out the prisons. Either execute the hardened criminals or lock 'em up -- however, other prisoners should be given the Australian option and be relocatted to areas of Siberia to start the re-population and re-building the infrastructure. People in jail for theft, drugs, etc. could get their sentences revoked if they agree to work 5 years in Siberia. This would go a long way towards eradicating anti-biotic resistant diseases from developing in Russian prisons.

5) Try more and more to link up with the USA in regards to economic revatalization. Europe is not the answer, North America is.




AH AH AH AH
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#4438 donquijote

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Posted 25 November 2004 - 02:21 PM

Originally posted by lolomarsei
AH AH AH AH



I don't think this brand of American-style communism will work...:confused:
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#4439 lolomarsei

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Posted 25 November 2004 - 02:25 PM

me too, it why i quoted that !
so funny

well, he wrote nothing about killing the blacks..may be he was tired
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#4440 donquijote

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Posted 25 November 2004 - 02:38 PM

Originally posted by lolomarsei
me too, it why i quoted that !
so funny

well, he wrote nothing about killing the blacks..may be he was tired



He forgets that America needs Perestroika too!;)
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