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What would it take for Russia to be #1?


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#901 woj1@cyberonic.

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Posted 29 August 2003 - 01:23 PM

Why GIJOE is wiser than donquijote?
GIJOE listens the street people. In contrary, donquijote send us an avalanches of texts written to manipulate the lambs.
Seeing it, I dig the street resources in search for knowledge; to popular John Grisham and his visionary book written before the last American presidential election;
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#902 donquijote

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Posted 29 August 2003 - 01:28 PM

A little entertaining page...;)

"Aesop told his stories to many people and they were passed down from generation to generation by word of mouth and were not written down for over two hundred years. Animals in Aesop's fables are always treated in an abstract or impersonal manner and are never given names. However, depending on the translator, the stories are often humorous and entertaining. Children read fables as a part of literature, but Aesop used the fable as a means of political and social criticism."

http://www.robcol.k1...rwell/aesop.htm
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#903 woj1@cyberonic.

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Posted 29 August 2003 - 01:38 PM

donquijote;
You asks me if I snore so I , inquire what is the reason behind your nick ; the symbol of worthless efforts or acknowledge an inferiority to Sancho Pansa?
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#904 donquijote

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Posted 29 August 2003 - 01:45 PM

<For Russia to be great once again ,it doesn't need a peaceful-humanist approach.Bike lanes and women leadership are great but in this world, two things:bread and knife ,matter.>

What's the knife for, to cut the bread or to steal from your neighbor?:confused:

As Bader said, Russia needs to go back to her best writers, say Tolstoy...;)

"In his eyes Karl Marx as well as Frederick Bastiat [a vulgar French economist, apologist for capitalism] were representatives of one and the same
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#905 donquijote

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Posted 29 August 2003 - 01:48 PM

< You asks me if I snore so I , inquire what is the reason behind your nick ; the symbol of worthless efforts or acknowledge an inferiority to Sancho Pansa?>

If you snore--us human beings not being perfect yet--is OK. It would have been a problem if you *roared*...;)
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#906 woj1@cyberonic.

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Posted 29 August 2003 - 01:50 PM

re; Aesop
Aesop is presumed to have been a sixth-century Greek slave, so his masquerade is comprehensible, but I have more difficulty with rationale of yours .
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#907 donquijote

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Posted 29 August 2003 - 01:59 PM

< Aesop is presumed to have been a sixth-century Greek slave, so his masquerade is comprehensible, but I have more difficulty with rationale of yours .>

I'll make it simple for you...

No Lion No Problema!;)
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#908 woj1@cyberonic.

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Posted 29 August 2003 - 02:23 PM

donquijote;

Problem still exists; Can nation of ship be democratic?

Essence of leadership ; lion is a lamb with TV and other Media. . ..

"The successful lamb thinks like his sheep, and can lead his flock only if he keeps no more than the shorter distance in advance. He must remain in fact recognizable as one of the flock, magnified no doubt, louder, coarser, above al with more urgent wants and ways of expression than the common sheep , but in essence to their feeling of the same flesh with them. . (Trotter)
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#909 GIJOE

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Posted 29 August 2003 - 03:37 PM

There is no conflict with your last post, it has virtue, however, we should all have some respect for the teachings of those we feel are in the know according to our own logic and set of values.

otherwise we have similar views on the above subject

G I Joe
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#910 donquijote

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Posted 29 August 2003 - 04:57 PM

<Problem still exists; Can nation of ship be democratic?

Essence of leadership ; lion is a lamb with TV and other Media. . ..

"The successful lamb thinks like his sheep, and can lead his flock only if he keeps no more than the shorter distance in advance. He must remain in fact recognizable as one of the flock, magnified no doubt, louder, coarser, above al with more urgent wants and ways of expression than the common sheep , but in essence to their feeling of the same flesh with them. . (Trotter)>

It don't see most of today's "democracies" following that model though. At most they are led by *foxes*...;)

The thing is we should push the limits of what the sheep can be, the more democracy the better. Maybe they'd be better behaved than the lion himself, if they are taught self-government and economic self-efficiency. You may be surprised...

'Democracy, like so many other human institutions, is a difficult concept to define accurately. In human political structures, "democracy" takes on many forms, many of which seem unrelated to the concept itself. For instance, the Soviet Union consistently maintained that it was a democracy; were they lying? Probably not. The issue is only answerable if you examine the Soviet concept of a democracy. Is the United States a democracy? Probably not. In the strictest sense of the word, American representative government comes closer to what the Greeks would call an aristocracy ("rule by the best") rather than a democracy ("rule by the people").'

full text...

http://www.wsu.edu/~...SSARY/DEMOC.HTM
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#911 donquijote

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Posted 29 August 2003 - 05:34 PM

One of the things we must learn is that lions come in all colors--black, white, yellow--political affiliation and religions, which makes them so much more dangerous than the ones in the wild, where at least a lion is still a lion.:rolleyes:

After 10 years of "political freedom" South Africa remains in the hands of a few lions who control the *water well* (the economy). Of course, now some of them are black...;)

One thing though, now South Africa has a *hope*, the hope of winning *the lotto*, which has become a major source of cash for the lion, I mean for the government...:D

This is from an interesting PBS program on South Africa...

Mishal Husain: Does deracializing South Africa's economy, though, make a difference to its relationship with the United States? If South Africa remains an economy as it is at the moment still controlled by the white minority, ultimately does that matter to the U.S.?

Susan Rice: Yes, because *it's inherently unstable* [take note, injustice makes a system unstable] as long as that's the case. It's going to be politically unstable and economically unstable, and the combination of the two could mean it becomes a security risk. And I'll come back to why I say that. But the South African society cannot succeed unless *with political change comes economic change as well*, and change that benefits the majority population. If that doesn't happen then the democracy is threatened, then civil society can be torn asunder, then you could have a return to racial violence, you could have pressures of the sort that accumulated and were manipulated in neighboring states to redistribute land. And South Africa no longer becomes a potential engine of growth for much of the rest of sub-Saharan Africa, but could deteriorate, in worst case scenario, and I don't expect this to happen, into a fragile and or a failed state. And that's a security risk to the United States because in South Africa you've got great infrastructure. You've got a long coastline. You've got very precious resources like gold and diamonds. All of the sorts of things that you would not want to see fall into the hands of terrorist or others who could manipulate them and exploit them and do us and the people of Africa harm.

Mishal Husain: Do you think that the black empowerment strategy as we see it in South Africa at the moment is really the most effective possible means to create a strong black middle class because it strikes me that it is creating a black elite in many ways. And one of the businessmen we see in the film Humphrey Khoza is obviously one of the few really successful black CEOs, but he's still the exception.

Susan Rice: Yes, but the time is short [what's 10 years?;)]. I think you can't possibly judge the success of black economic empowerment in the time frame that we've seen. Obviously it's going to start with a small core, and if it succeeds it will benefit a far broader section of society. I think what was interesting, as we saw in the film, is that the strategy of his company depends on creating small and medium size enterprises essentially at the grassroots level that will be self-sustaining long after Uthingo moves on. And that's very important. That's where growth is going to come, whether we're talking about South Africa the rest of Africa or anywhere else in the developing world, it's the small and medium size enterprise level. It's with small women entrepreneurs who, in this case, got the contract for repairing the lottery machines. These are the sorts of businesses where you get women who wouldn't be in the workforce or, for that matter, men who wouldn't be in the workforce. They're given jobs, they're given skills, they're given capital and if that piece of the pyramid -- the bottom part of the pyramid -- can be expanded and sustained, then that's where you're going to start to see the benefits.

Mishal Husain: But those aren't the companies that really produce the most money for South Africa. I mean the big companies, the mining companies, the diamond companies, all of those companies are the ones which are overwhelmingly white today.

Susan Rice: No, but it's at that small micro level where the jobs are going to be created. There are only a finite number of jobs that Anglo America can provide within South Africa. There are limits to its own internal growth capacity. So what you need if the economy there and elsewhere, anywhere, is going to grow is job creation at what I would call the grassroots level at the small and medium size enterprise level. That's not to say that domestic and foreign investment isn't important and that large multinationals or domestic conglomerates are not important. And you also obviously have to change their policies. But the job growth, which is what is the critical requirement in South Africa for political sustainability as well as economic redistribution, is going to have to come from the grassroots level.

full text...

http://www.pbs.org/w...transcript.html

http://webspawner.com/users/donquijote
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#912 woj1@cyberonic.

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Posted 29 August 2003 - 07:13 PM

donquijote;
//American representative government comes closer to what the Greeks would call an aristocracy ("rule by the best")//

Two quotations were purposely written to answer your comic statement ;

1.0) To teach people to read without teaching them not to believe everything they read is only to prepare them for a new slavery. (Jean Guehenno.)

2.0) Much reading is an oppression of the mind and extinguishes the natural candle, which is the reason of so many senseless scholars in the world. (William Pen)
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#913 donquijote

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Posted 29 August 2003 - 07:29 PM

<Two quotations were purposely written to answer your comic statement ;

1.0) To teach people to read without teaching them not to believe everything they read is only to prepare them for a new slavery. (Jean Guehenno.)

2.0) Much reading is an oppression of the mind and extinguishes the natural candle, which is the reason of so many senseless scholars in the world. (William Pen)>

I don't believe you...:D
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#914 donquijote

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Posted 29 August 2003 - 07:44 PM

<Two quotations were purposely written to answer your comic statement ;

1.0) To teach people to read without teaching them not to believe everything they read is only to prepare them for a new slavery. (Jean Guehenno.)

2.0) Much reading is an oppression of the mind and extinguishes the natural candle, which is the reason of so many senseless scholars in the world. (William Pen)>

OK, you deserve more time...;)

I think that the invention of Gutenberg's printing press may have had unintended consequences. Indeed too often it has become an instrument for brainwashing. The same television. Endless cheap shows keep the massed drooling while serving as a commercial instrument. But it's the educated elite that so manipulates the uneducated little people, who otherwise would be more skeptical. OK we can look at examples from the real world. Which people is more empowered the educated Swedes or the uneducated Haitians?

But what I propose is education and literacy in computers. In other words ordinary people--like you and me--would have the opportunity to participate in the most democratic instrument of all: the Internet. And that would quite revolutionary...;)

http://webspawner.com/users/donquijote
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#915 donquijote

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Posted 29 August 2003 - 08:01 PM

I'm waiting for this book to see if we can learn something we don't already know...;)

Matthew Miller is author of the upcoming book, "The 2 Percent Solution: Fixing America's Problems in Ways Liberals and Conservatives Can Love" in bookstores nationwide this September.

Should money equal
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#916 donquijote

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Posted 29 August 2003 - 08:32 PM

What's the best place?

http://engforum.prav...&threadid=31941
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#917 donquijote

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Posted 29 August 2003 - 09:01 PM

For those who like federalism...

http://www.forumfed....ult.asp?lang=en

Specifically Switzerland...

http://www.swisspoli....php?page=front

Federalism news...

http://www.forumfed....federations.pdf

Characteristics of Federalism in Switzerland

What differentiates federalism in Switzerland from federalism in other states? Which terms best describe the Swiss brand of federalism? The following short text explains four terms which are of central importance to Swiss federalism: non-centralisation, subsidiarity, solidarity and cooperative federalism.

Federalism
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#918 woj1@cyberonic.

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Posted 29 August 2003 - 09:16 PM

re; //One of the things we must learn is that lions come in all colors--black, white, yellow
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#919 woj1@cyberonic.

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Posted 30 August 2003 - 09:49 AM

re;;
//The point is that those in control don't want education//
//"Education must, then, be not only a transmission of culture but also a provider of alternative views of the world
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#920 woj1@cyberonic.

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Posted 30 August 2003 - 10:54 AM

Donquijote ; cooperatives or freedom?

What is biggest value for a man
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