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#201 Zharkov

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Posted 23 September 2015 - 04:12 PM

Got Obama's fingerprints?    Of course they do.  

Which brings up the big  question, if anyone can steal US government files and secret records,

what is the NSA good for?   

 

If NSA was listening, and they know they were, why didn't they say something?

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

 

Hackers of US Personnel Records Got 5.6M Fingerprints

The fingerprint records of about 5.6 million current and former federal workers, contractors and job applicants were stolen in the breach of the U.S. Office of Personnel Management’s computer system, up from an initial estimate of 1.1 million, the agency said Wednesday.

The breach is significant because fingerprints are increasingly being used by government agencies, corporations and consumers for access to computers, buildings and other devices.

“Federal experts believe that, as of now, the ability to misuse fingerprint data is limited,” Samuel Schumach, a spokesman for OPM, which is the federal government’s jobs agency, said in a statement. “However, this probability could change over time as technology evolves.”

U.S. officials and private cybersecurity experts believe the OPM breach, which compromised data on 21.5 million individuals, was carried out by the Chinese government. The announcement Wednesday comes as Chinese President Xi Jinping is in the U.S. and plans to hold a summit with President Barack Obama on Friday. Cybersecurity is one of the top items that will be discussed.

The announcement doesn’t increase the estimate that the hack compromised sensitive information and Social Security numbers of 21.5 million individuals, some of whom were screened for U.S. government security clearances. OPM said an interagency team will continue to analyze the data as it prepares to mail notification letters to those impacted.

http://www.newsmax.c...9/23/id/692912/


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#202 Zharkov

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Posted 30 September 2015 - 12:10 AM


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#203 Zharkov

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Posted 01 October 2015 - 12:20 AM


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#204 Zharkov

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Posted 04 October 2015 - 03:51 PM

Investigators for the Congressional Joint Inquiry discovered that an FBI informant had hosted and even rented a room to two hijackers in 2000 and that, when the Inquiry sought to interview the informant, the FBI refused outright, and then hid him in an unknown location, and that a high-level FBI official stated these blocking maneuvers were undertaken under orders from the White House.

As the New York Times notes:

    Senator Bob Graham, the Florida Democrat who is a former chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, accused the White House on Tuesday of covering up evidence ….The accusation stems from the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s refusal to allow investigators for a Congressional inquiry and the independent Sept. 11 commission to interview an informant, Abdussattar Shaikh, who had been the landlord in San Diego of two Sept. 11 hijackers.

So mass surveillance of Americans isn’t necessary, when the FBI informant should have apprehended the hijackers.

Moreover, the NSA actually did intercept Mihdhar’s phone calls before 9/11.

The U.S. government heard the 9/11 plans from the hijackers’ own mouth.

Most of what we wrote about involved the NSA and other intelligence services tapping top Al Qaeda operatives’ phone calls outside the U.S.

However, as leading NSA expert James Bamford - the Washington  Investigative Producer for ABC’s World News Tonight with Peter Jennings for almost a decade, winner of a number of journalism awards for coverage national security issues, whose articles have appeared in dozens of publications, including cover stories for the New York Times Magazine, Washington Post Magazine, and the Los Angeles Times Magazine, and the only author to write any books (he wrote 3) on the NSA – reports, the NSA was also tapping the hijackers’ phone calls inside the U.S.

Specifically, hijackers Khalid al-Mihdhar and Nawaf al-Hazmi lived in San Diego, California, for 2 years before 9/11. Numerous phone calls between al-Mihdhar and Nawaf al-Hazmi in San Diego and a high-level Al Qaeda operations base in Yemen were made in those 2 years.

The NSA had been tapping and eavesdropping on all calls made from that Yemen phone for years.   So NSA recorded all of these phone calls.

U.S. and allied intelligence heard the 9/11 hijackers plans from their own mouths:

    -According to Le Monde, the intelligence services of America’s close ally, France among other governments, had infiltrated the highest levels of Al-Qaeda’s camps, and actually listened to the hijackers’ debates about which airlines’ planes should be hijacked, and allied intelligence services also intercepted phone conversations between Al-Qaeda members regarding the attacks

    -According to journalist Christopher Ketcham, America’s close ally Israel tracked the hijackers’ every move prior to the attacks, and sent agents to film the attack on the World Trade Centers.

    -The National Security Agency and the FBI were each independently listening in on the phone calls between the supposed mastermind of the attacks and the lead hijacker. Indeed, the FBI built its own antenna in Madagascar specifically to listen in on the mastermind’s phone calls

    -According to various sources, on the day before 9/11, the mastermind told the lead hijacker “tomorrow is zero hour” and gave final approval for the attacks. The NSA intercepted the message that day and the FBI was likely also monitoring the mastermind’s phone calls.

    -Shortly before 9/11, the NSA also intercepted multiple phone calls to the United States from Bin Laden’s chief of operations.

    -The CIA and the NSA had been intercepting phone calls by the hijackers for years.


http://www.infowars....-been-debunked/


Edited by Zharkov, 04 October 2015 - 03:52 PM.

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#205 Zharkov

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Posted 07 October 2015 - 12:25 AM

DID NSA HELP TO COVER UP THE MURDER OF LADY DIANA?


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#206 Zharkov

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Posted 08 October 2015 - 02:34 PM

WHERE WAS THE NSA WHEN AMERICA NEEDS THEM?

 

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Senior U.S. lawmakers have begun probing possible intelligence lapses over Moscow’s intervention in Syria, concerned that American spy agencies were slow to grasp the scope and intention of Russia’s dramatic military offensive there, U.S. congressional sources and other officials told Reuters.

    A week after Russia plunged directly into Syria’s civil war by launching a campaign of air strikes, the intelligence committees of the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives want to examine the extent to which the spy community overlooked or misjudged critical warning signs, the sources said.

    Findings of major blind spots would mark the latest of several U.S. intelligence misses in recent years, including Moscow’s surprise takeover of Ukraine’s Crimea region last year and China’s rapid expansion of island-building activities in the South China Sea.

Though spy agencies have sought to ramp up intelligence gathering on Russia since the crisis over Ukraine, they continue to struggle with inadequate resources because of the emphasis on counter-terrorism in the Middle East and the Afghanistan-Pakistan region, according to current and former U.S. officials.  (Z: "INADEQUATE" BECAUSE THEIR RESOURCES ARE TIED UP SPYING ON AMERICANS AND GERMANS AND FRENCH.)

    A senior administration official, who also asked not to be identified, insisted that there were “no surprises” and that policymakers were “comfortable” with the intelligence they received in the lead-up to the Russian offensive.

    Spy agencies had carefully tracked Russian President Vladimir Putin’s build-up of military assets and personnel in Syria in recent weeks, prompting White House criticism and demands for Moscow to explain itself.

    But intelligence officers – and the U.S. administration they serve - were caught mostly off-guard by the speed and aggressiveness of Putin’s use of air power as well as a Russian target list that included U.S.-backed rebels, according to the officials, who spoke on condition of anonymity.

"They saw some of this going on but didn't appreciate the magnitude," one of the sources told Reuters.

Russia’s sudden move to ramp up its military involvement in the Syria crisis has thrown Obama's Middle East strategy into doubt and laid bare an erosion of U.S. influence in the region.

A shortage of reliable information and analysis could further hamper President Barack Obama’s efforts to craft a response on Syria to regain the initiative from Washington’s former Cold War foe.

BEHIND THE CURVE?

It is unclear how his administration could have reacted differently with better intelligence, though advance word of Putin’s attack plans might have allowed U.S. officials to warn the moderate Syrian opposition that they could end up in Russia's line of fire.

Obama, who is reluctant to see America drawn deeper into another Middle East conflict, has shown no desire to directly confront Russia over its Syria offensive – something Moscow may have taken as a green light to escalate its operations.

Syrian troops and militia backed by Russian warplanes mounted what appeared to be their first major coordinated assault on Syrian insurgents on Wednesday and Moscow said its warships fired a barrage of missiles at them from the Caspian Sea, a sign of its new military reach.

Russia's military build-up now includes a growing naval presence, long-range rockets and a battalion of troops backed by Moscow's most modern tanks, the U.S. ambassador to NATO said.

The U.S. administration believes it now has a better understanding at least of Putin’s main motive – to do whatever it takes to prop up Syrian President Bashar al-Assad. But Washington remains uncertain exactly how much further Putin is willing to go in terms of deployment of advanced military assets, the U.S. officials said.

(Z:  DUH!   REALLY PATHETIC - EVEN I KNEW THAT MUCH WITHOUT A SINGLE HUMINT SOURCE OR SATELLITE PHOTO.   CLUE:  SYRIA AND RUSSIA ARE ALLIES!   MUTUAL DEFENSE AND ALL THAT?)

The lack of clarity stems in part from the limited ability of U.S. intelligence agencies to discern what Putin and a tightly knit circle of advisers are thinking and planning.   (Z:  Maybe they should do more reading on Russian websites?)

In a tense meeting with Putin at the United Nations early last week, Obama was not given any advance notice of Russia’s attack plans, aides said. Russian air strikes began two days later, including the targeting of CIA-trained “moderate” anti-Assad rebels, though Moscow insisted it only hit Islamic State insurgents.

“They did not expect the speed with which Putin ramped things up," said Michael McFaul, Obama’s former ambassador to Moscow. "He likes the element of surprise."

U.S. intelligence agencies did closely follow and report to policymakers Russian moves to sharply expand infrastructure at its key air base in Latakia as well as the deployment of heavy equipment, including combat aircraft, to Syria, officials said.

“We’re not mind readers,” the senior administration official said. “We didn’t know when Russia would fly the first sortie, but our analysis of the capabilities that were there was that they were there for a reason.”

However, several other officials said U.S. agencies were behind the curve in assessing how far the Russians intended to go and how quickly they intended to launch operations.

In fact, right up until a White House briefing given shortly after the bombing began, Obama press secretary Josh Earnest declined to draw "firm conclusions" on Russia's strategy.

CONFUSION OVER RUSSIAN INTENT

One source suggested that U.S. experts initially thought the Russian build-up might have been more for a military "snap exercise" or a temporary show of force than preparations for sustained, large-scale attacks on Assad's enemies.

Another official said that after initial review, congressional oversight investigators believe that "information on this was not moving quickly enough through channels” to policymakers.

And another source said there had been a "lag of a week" before agencies began voicing full-throated alarm about imminent Russian military operations.

The senior administration official said, however, that “I don’t think anybody here perceived a gap” in intelligence.

In their reviews of how U.S. intelligence handled the Syria build-up, officials said congressional intelligence committees would examine reports issued by the agencies and question officers involved in the process, according to congressional and national security sources. At the moment, no public hearings are planned, the officials said.

Though the senior administration official denied the intelligence community was paying any less attention to Syria, John Herbst, a former U.S. ambassador to Ukraine, said that not enough intelligence assets had been devoted to analyzing Putin’s “aggressive policies”.

McFaul, who took the view that the Obama administration had been largely on top of the situation as Putin prepared his offensive, said that a faster or more precise intelligence assessment would probably have done little to change the outcome.

“What difference would it make if we had known 48 hours ahead of time?” asked McFaul, who now teaches at Stanford University in California. “There still wouldn’t have been any better options for deterring Putin in Syria.”

http://news.yahoo.co...-051400295.html


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#207 Zharkov

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Posted 08 October 2015 - 02:42 PM

How much does it take before the "intelligence community" is replaced with new faces?

 

Big things they claim they missed:

 

1.   Collapse of the USSR.

2.   WTC on 9/11

3.   North Korea's Atomic Bomb Program

4.   Iraq's missing WMD

5.   Crimea's vote

6.   Syria's Russian intervention

 

Not to mention the little things like the assassination of JFK, Chinese subs in US waters, hacking Hillary's home server, hacking federal employee files, hacking the Pentagon, hacking defense contractor blueprints, hacking banks, billions of dollars stolen from the Pentagon, missing e-mails, etc.  

 

All of which makes one wonder whether they are being paid to watch porn on their computers all day?


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#208 Zharkov

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Posted 08 October 2015 - 02:43 PM

It's wonderful to know they are watching me on the internet, but who is watching them?


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#209 Zharkov

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Posted 25 October 2015 - 04:34 PM

What in the world is the NSA really watching?

Kiddie porn?   Facebook?   T.V. Sitcom Shows?

Forum posters?   The inside of their eyelids?

 

Assad visit to Moscow takes U.S. and allies by surprise
http://rbth.com/inte...surprise_532919

 

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Wow!   How did this slip past their omnivorous software?   Their all-seeing eyes?  


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#210 Zharkov

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Posted 10 November 2015 - 03:01 AM

NSA ORDERED TO STOP LISTENING TO OTHER PEOPLE'S TELEPHONES

 

A federal judge on Monday ordered the National Security Agency to stop collecting telephone records for some of the citizens who sued the government after Edward Snowden leaked details of the vast sweep of private data.

The ruling from U.S. District Judge Richard Leon comes almost two years after he issued an injunction to halt the program. At that time, he stayed his injunction to give the government time to appeal.

But the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals took most of that time to decide on a secondary issue, and even though the collection program is about to expire and be replaced by a new set of rules, Leon said enough is enough.

“I will grant plaintiffs J.J. Little and J.J. Little & Associates’ requests for an injunction and enter an order consistent with this opinion that (1) bars the government from collecting, as part of the NSA’s Bulk Telephony Metadata Program, any telephony metadata associated with these plaintiffs’ Verizon Business Network Services accounts and (2) requires the government to segregate any such metadata in its possession that has already been collected.”

Leon explained that in his December 2013 opinion, he stayed his order “pending appeal in light of the national security interests at stake and the novelty of the constitutional issues raised.”

“I did so with the optimistic hope that the appeals process would move expeditiously,” he said. “However, because it has been almost two years since I first found that the NSA’s Bulk Telephony Metadata Program likely violates the Constitution and because the loss of constitutional freedoms for even one day is a significant harm … I will not do so today.”

"Police State USA"
He said the plaintiffs are likely to succeed on the merits of their Fourth Amendment claim.

Leon noted the importance of protecting the Fourth Amendment and concluded he could not “allow the government to trump the Constitution merely because it suits the exigencies of the moment.”

He continued, “To be sure, the very purpose of the Fourth Amendment would be undermined were this court to defer to Congress’s determination that individual liberty should be sacrificed to better combat today’s evil.”

In the program, the NSA monitors the telephone numbers used in calls in an effort to identify potential national security threats.

The program was exposed by former NSA contractor and document leaker Edward Snowden, who has sought refuge in Russia.

Several plaintiffs sued, and Leon ruled the program is likely unconstitutional. The case was sent up to the appeals court, which sat on it for months.

A replacement program, adopted by Congress and scheduled to begin at the end of November, essentially has the telephone companies keep the records and give them to the government according to a protocol.

The appeals court ordered the case back to Leon to determine whether discovery would be helpful.

The most significant issue raised at the appellate level was that the plaintiffs were customers of Verizon Wireless, while it was the company’s business network that was identified as a participant in the data-collection program.

Attorney Larry Klayman of Freedom Watch, who brought the case on behalf of himself and other plaintiffs, then added the business network customers to the lawsuit.

Leon pointed out that “although the daily bulk collection, storage and analysis of telephony metadata is not expressly authorized” by the law, the government went ahead with the program.

“This is one of the most significant cases in the history of litigation against the government,” Klayman said.

“Never before in American history have people been subjected to such egregious violations of their constitutional rights,” he said. “Thank God that there are judges like Leon who will stand up for the American people. Without this, revolution is almost assured if more judges do not start to do their job, like Leon, and protect the citizenry from government tyranny.”

For Klayman himself and a couple other plaintiffs, the judge said there was not enough evidence of their own injury. The judge explained that documentation about the secret program’s efforts to obtain their specific information was not in evidence.

But for the Little plaintiffs, there was no such hurdle.

“Given the strong presumption that the NSA collected, and warehoused, the Little plaintiff’s data within the past five years, these plaintiffs unquestionably have standing to enjoin any future queries of that data,” Leon wrote.

He said neither adjustments President Obama made in the program, nor its scheduled demise in weeks, nor the replacement data collection program coming soon, alters his analysis that the actions violate the Fourth Amendment.

“The fact remains that indiscriminate, daily bulk collection, long-term retention, and analysis of telephony metadata almost certainly violates a person’s reasonable expectation of privacy,” he said.

He called it “a sweeping, and truly astounding program that targets millions of Americans arbitrarily and indiscriminately.”

He said it’s “absurd to suggest the Constitution favors, or even tolerates, such extreme measures!”

Finally, he said, Americans were kept in the dark by the government.

“The program was, and continues to be shrouded in secret,” he wrote. “This may, of course, be practically necessary for the program to be effective, but it nevertheless increases the level of the privacy intrusion.”

Worse, he added, the results of the government’s efforts are nil.

“To date, the government has still not cited a single instance in which telephone metadata analysis actually stopped an imminent attack, or otherwise aided the government in achieving any time-sensitive objective.”

WND reported when Klayman expressed the desire for the government “to obey the Fourth Amendment.”

Klayman wrote that a preliminary injunction is needed so that the government “can be held to obey the law, and can be held in contempt, if necessary.”

He said requiring the government to follow the Fourth Amendment “is not too much to ask.”

Klayman said the fact that the USA Patriot Act, under which the spying has been done, is expiring and is being replaced by the USA Freedom Act, does not matter.

The analysis remains, he wrote, “because the government defendants do not admit to any limitation from those particular statutes on … spying on plaintiffs and other U.S. citizens who have no connection to terrorism.”

In Leon’s original injunction, he called the program “almost Orwellian.”

Klayman originally sued the NSA, Barack Obama, then-Attorney General Eric Holder and a number of other federal officials. Other defendants include NSA chief Keith Alexander, U.S. Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court Judge Roger Vinson, Director of National Intelligence James Clapper, CIA chief John Brennan, FBI chief James Comey, the Department of Justice, the CIA and the FBI.

Plaintiffs in the case include Klayman, Charles and Mary Ann Strange, Michael Ferrari, Matt Garrison and J.J. Little.

Two of America’s influential civil-rights groups, the American Civil Liberties Union and the Electronic Frontier Foundation, have sided with Klayman.

The data that the NSA collects, they explained in a brief, “reveals political affiliation, religious practices and peoples’ most intimate associations.”

“It reveals who calls a suicide prevention line and who calls their elected official; who calls the local tea-party office and who calls Planned Parenthood.”

The groups’ brief said “the relevant fact for whether an expectation of privacy exists is that the comprehensive telephone records the government collects – not just the records of a few calls over a few days but all of a person’s calls over many years – reveals highly personal information about the person and her life.”

http://www.wnd.com/2...ce/?cat_orig=us


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#211 Zharkov

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Posted 10 November 2015 - 03:24 PM

There is, at least, one good federal judge in America.

He read the US Constitution and understands what it means.


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#212 Zharkov

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Posted 11 November 2015 - 12:19 AM

NSA - An Agency in Crisis | | Observer

The agency inherited by his successor, Admiral Mike Rogers, remains in a state of crisis.
NSA employees have faced uncomfortable questions about what they really do ...
observer.com/2015/11/an-agency-in-crisis/
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
 
Maybe if they stop violating the 4th Amendment, they might get more respect?
So they wake up one morning and discovered they are all criminals?
Who clued them in on their crimes...Mr. Snowden?
Somebody should give them a copy of the US Constitution to read in their spare time.

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#213 Zharkov

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Posted 14 November 2015 - 02:21 PM

As long as NSA violates French law by listening in on their politicians, maybe they should listen in on their terrorists too?

 

What happened NSA?    No muslim wiretaps allowed?

 

Where was the CIA when Paris was being shot up by terrorists?   Were they still looking for bin Laden?

 

How come every terrorist attack catches them off guard?    Why all the intel surprises?

 

What exactly are they doing with their super ears and eyes?    Watching French porn again?

 

How can terrorists attack with macineguns 7 different places in Paris with nobody at CIA and NSA noticing their preparation or communications?    Or did you know and simply decide it was a French problem?


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#214 Zharkov

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Posted 16 November 2015 - 02:25 PM

A Former NSA Whistleblower Thinks Everyone in D.C. Should Be Fired

Calling the U.S. the largest threat to U.S. security, Bill Binney accused Congress of exercising no oversight

Bill Binney, a former NSA Technical Leader for Intelligence, was hailed as one of the best analysts in NSA history for his expertise in intelligence and mathematics.

But he turned whistleblower in 2002 after the agency rejected his successful prototype wiretapping program ThinThread, which protected privacy by encrypting attributes that identified people, and filtering out and collecting only specifically targeted data.

The NSA instead pursued Trailblazer, a program that was meant to usher the NSA into “an era of effective and efficient digital network exploitation” by tracking cell phone calls and emails. Mr. Binney and several colleagues, however, believed that Trailblazer was fraudulent and wasteful, and indeed the program, which was several hundred million dollars over budget and years behind schedule, was shut down in 2006.

Thanks to Reddit, Mr. Binney finally got an opportunity to contribute to the conversation Mr. Snowden started in 2013.

Read more (If NSA has not made that particular web page disappear)

http://observer.com/...hould-be-fired/


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#215 Zharkov

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Posted 19 November 2015 - 08:48 PM

A FLOOD OF DATA -

Leaked NSA doc reveals ‘sheer luck’ needed to find useful info in sea of surveillance data

 

The NSA didn’t know it was already sitting on a “goldmine” of data on one of its targets until one of its analysts discovered it by “sheer luck,” according to an internal newsletter entry leaked by Edward Snowden.

The article, dated March 23, 2011, was written by a signals development analyst in SIDtoday, an NSA in-house newsletter. He explains how he discovered the contact and personal information for over 10,000 people, as well as some 900 account login details, after “a ton of hard work,” according to reports from The Intercept and teleSUR.

“By sheer luck, (and a ton of hard work) I discovered an important new access to an existing target and am working with TAO to leverage a new mission capability,” the analyst wrote to colleagues. TAO refers to Tailored Access Operations, an NSA hacking team which had collected the 900 usernames and passcodes.

The “existing target” was Petróleos de Venezuela, a Venezuelan state oil company also referred to as PDVSA.

Matthew Green, a Johns Hopkins Information Security Institute professor, told The Intercept it was “interesting” that the analyst used the word “discovered” because it means that either the NSA “didn’t realize” it had been collecting PDVSA’s information or that, perhaps, there had been a bureaucratic miscommunication on the subject.

“They’re capturing so much information from their cable taps that even the NSA analysts don’t know what they’ve got,” Green said.

An NSA review in 2010 found that its data on PDVSA had become “stagnant,” so it is clear why the analyst described the newly found materials as a “goldmine.”

“To understand PDVSA is to understand the economic heart of Venezuela,” the analyst wrote, who noted petroleum makes up “more than half of all government revenues.”

A “telltale sign,” as the analyst called it, of the NSA’s lapse in data mining was that “most reporting was coming from warranted collection,” likely referring to secret FISA warrants issued for surveillance of US communication lines.

The analyst ran a “target reboot,” a fresh batch of searches on PDVSA, aimed at “namely, the president and members of the Board of Directors,” using an NSA database called PINWALE that automatically compiles “targeting selectors” like email or IP addresses from large swaths of intercepted internet activity.

Soon after, in May 2011, the Department of State placed sanctions on PDVSA, claiming it was violating US sanctions against Iran. The announcement was made at the same time that Venezuela’s government was in court with Exxon Mobil and ConocoPhillips over its handling of oil drilling sites, which the US companies claimed had wrongly gone to PDVSA.

In recent weeks, the Wall Street Journal has reported that the US is pursuing “a series of wide-ranging investigations” aimed at PDVSA.

https://www.rt.com/u...-venezuela-oil/


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#216 Zharkov

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Posted 28 November 2015 - 04:53 PM

Our intelligence agencies would have to be blind, deaf and dumb not to have uncovered all of this by now:

The president of Turkey’s own family is working directly with ISIS, and Obama is doing nothing.

 

Turkey downed the Russian Su-24 Fencer bomber over Syria in response to the destruction of hundreds of semi-truck oil tankers sent to Turkey from Syria by the Islamic State, Syrian Information Minister Omran al-Zoubi said.

 

The information minister said that oil smuggled into Turkey was bought by the Turkish president’s son, who owns an oil company.

 

“All of the oil was delivered to a company that belongs to the son of Recep [Tayyip] Erdogan. This is why Turkey became anxious when Russia began delivering airstrikes against the IS infrastructure and destroyed more than 500 trucks with oil already. This really got on Erdogan and his company’s nerves. They’re importing not only oil, but wheat and historic artefacts as well,”


In fact, President Erdogan’s own daughter is even helping to provide “extended medical care” for wounded ISIS militants in Turkish hospitals…

http://www.infowars....ing-to-stop-it/

 

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

 

NSA, now you know that Obama has committed treason against the United States.

 

What are YOU going to do about it?


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#217 Zharkov

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Posted 30 November 2015 - 03:17 PM

As in the Matrix movie, the world's citizens have two choices, the red pill and the blue pill - truth or propaganda.   Most of the time they swallow the wrong pill.   Open your eyes.   What you have seen on this thread are not Russians complaining about Russian propaganda, but Americans waking up.   They have something to tell you.   Listen to them.

The control matrix has become visible.    The controlled news media reports government-approved news releases concering the US wars and allied governments and spinning government crimes as mere politics, the controlled scripts for movies and television shows make sure government agencies always win, even torturing and killing "the bad guys" (t.v. show "24 Hours"), portraying internet as evil (t.v. show "Cybercrime"), and making government critics into public enemies.   The controlled universities (Harvard) have the only real teaching credential as a belief in government socialism and a willingness to teach it to gullible students.

One US general announces that "it is time to kill Russians", and soon magically it happens - as an American ally (Turkey) shoots down a Russian pilot and kills him.   One dead Russian served up on a silver platter while the Ukraine government quietly kills Russians wholesale with CIA advice.   Whatever the globalist controllers want, it is delivered.

It is clear that much of the so-called "free world" lives under control of mafia-like societies called "governments".    Governments once were populated by idealistic, freedom-loving ordinary land owners and workers, but they are now comprised entirely of professional politicians whose job is to maintain control of the population while the elected officials are stealing money.   The population is expendable.  We are "The Expendables".   We are their slaves with a difference - they have our minds along with our labor.

Donald Trump is one example of a basically middle class guy who through his own hard work became a billionaire, but his attitudes are American middle class.   

The Obama regime hates Trump, their socialist news media hates him, socialist academia hates him, because he is not one of them.   He is not a socialist but an outsider candidate, and he is winning.   That is why television programs like "Meet The Press" can spend half their show criticizing him without a single good word to say about anything he represents.    

The controllers hate the public, they hate the real America that is between the two coasts.   The controlled news media hammers Trump with every comment he makes that is not politically correct.   They know America is slowly awakening to realize the control grid is almost complete.   Resistance is building.   Trump symbolizes that resistance.   People line up to hear him.  

 

The globalists must restore political correctness or the game is lost, but Trump is still winning.  Americans have had enough of politicians telling them what to think, what to believe, how to act, what to say, even what to eat.   That is not freedom.   That is not America.   That is an extreme form of European socialism and we don't want or need it.   

 

We have a 4th Amendment protecting our privacy.   Every federal person took an oath to protect and defend that Amendment.    It is a crime to violate it.    Every government employee, every federal agent who remains silent while this massive crime is perpetrated on the citizens, is guilty of disloyalty to the country.   It's time to speak out against the destruction of America.     There will be no reward for keeping Obama's crimes a secret.
 


Edited by Zharkov, 30 November 2015 - 03:21 PM.

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#218 Zharkov

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Posted 05 December 2015 - 05:46 AM

Now, NSA look at Russians and see what you missed...

 


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#219 Zharkov

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Posted 20 April 2016 - 02:29 AM

US Court troubled by surveillance excesses at FBI, NSA

By Josh Gerstein


In a just-released court opinion, a federal court judge overseeing government surveillance programs said he was "extremely concerned" about a series of incidents in which the Federal Bureau of Investigation and National Security Agency deviated from court-approved limits on their snooping activities.

Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court Judge Thomas Hogan sharply criticized the two agencies over the episodes, referred to by intelligence gatherers as "compliance incidents." He also raised concerns that the government had taken years to bring the NSA-related issues to the court's attention and he said that delay might have run afoul of the government's duty of candor to the court.

"The court was extremely concerned about NSA's failure to comply with its minimization procedures—and potentially" a provision in federal law, Hogan wrote. The NSA violations appeared to involve preserving surveillance data in its systems beyond the two or five years after which it was supposed to be deleted.

"Perhaps more disappointing than the NSA's failure to purge this information for more than four years, was the Government's failure to convey to the Court explicitly during that time that the NSA was continuing to retain this information," the judge wrote in the Nov. 6, 2015, opinion made public Tuesday.

In a statement, the Office of Director of National Intelligence said officials did not mean to be misleading. "The Government has informed the Court that there was no intent to leave the FISC with a misimpression or misunderstanding, and it has acknowledged that its prior representations could have been clearer," the statement posted on ODNI's Tumblr site said.

The NSA said in some cases it needed the data to prevent future incidents where data was accidentally collected without legal authority, like when a surveillance target enters the U.S. (At that point, officials are supposed to seek a more specific court order to continue the surveillance.) However, that wasn't the case with all of the old data NSA was hanging onto.

The FBI's troubles involved failing to use the required procedures when conducting surveillance of suspects overseas who are facing criminal charges in U.S. courts. In order to preserve attorney-client privilege, the FBI is supposed to have such surveillance reviewed by a "taint team" that can excise any legal communications, but that was not happening in all cases, the FBI reported.

Hogan said the FBI revealed some such incidents in 2014, but the number was redacted from the opinion made public Tuesday. "The government generally attributed those instances to individual failures or confusion, rather than a 'systematic issue,' " Hogan wrote. However, more incidents occurred from mid-2014 and through 2015, although again the precise number was not released. In some instances, FBI agents believed, incorrectly, that they didn't need to set up a review team if the indictment was under seal or outside the U.S.

"The Court was extremely concerned about these additional incidents of non-compliance," wrote Hogan, who also serves as a federal district court judge in Washington. He was appointed by President Ronald Reagan.

At a closed hearing last October, the FBI detailed some procedures set up to remedy the problem, including additional training and a system to remind agents when such reviews are needed. Hogan said he was "satisfied" that the FBI was "taking appropriate measures" to address the issue. However, he said he "strongly encourages" the government to find any other such mistakes and he said he wanted a briefing on those efforts earlier this year.

The FBI declined to comment, and spokespeople for the NSA did not immediately respond to a request for comment on the court ruling.


http://www.politico....olations-222162


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#220 Zharkov

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Posted 20 April 2016 - 02:30 AM

The above article is step #1.

Step #2 is a hearing for contempt of court when the NSA rejects the order to comply with the law.


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