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NSA's Dirty Work Exposed

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#221 Zharkov

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Posted 25 April 2016 - 12:38 AM

Step #3:   NSA employees, your immunity (if any) is open to challenge for constitutional violations:

 

CIA Psychologists Can be Sued for Creating Torture Program, Judge Says
 

Two CIA psychologists who devised a program of enhanced interrogation that included waterboarding and rectal feeding in secret prisons are getting sued for the first time in the US.

 

A civil lawsuit alleges that two CIA contract psychologists devised torture methods against three former detainees at secret prisons in the early 2000s. The alleged victims are now claiming damages.

 

In a ruling from the bench at federal district court in Spokane, Washington, Senior Judge Justin L. Quackenbush said he would deny a motion to dismiss the lawsuit against James E. Mitchell and Bruce Jessen. 

 

Both men are accused of creating programs that executed waterboarding, sleep deprivation, confinement in small boxes, rectal feeding and beatings against detainees, according to a 2014 Senate Intelligence Committee Report.

 

The plaintiffs include Mohammed Ahmed Ben Soud, a Libyan who was arrested in Pakistan in April 2013. He allegedly was held in a “secret” Afghan prison where he was tortured. He "continues to suffer deep psychological harm," the suit reads.

 

Suleiman Abdullah Salim, a Tanzanian, was allegedly sodomized and chained to a wall for 14 months in solitary confinement at a secret Afghan prison called the “salt pit.”

He now lives in Zanzibar, Tanzania.

 

The other plaintiffs are the family of Gul Rahman, an Afghan farmer who died of hypothermia, beatings and other abuse after two weeks in CIA custody in November 2002. The CIA later admitted it was a case of mistaken identity.

 

Lawyers for all three plaintiffs want Mitchell and Jessen to pay compensatory damages of more than $75,000, punitive damages and attorneys' fees. 

 

“It’s unprecedented,” said Dror Ladin, the American Civil Liberties Union attorney who argued the plaintiffs' case in court Friday. “No CIA torture victim has ever taken this step toward accountability. Every previous lawsuit has been shut down before this stage.”

 

Lawyers for the defendants argue they were not part of the alleged torture.

 

“They did not make decisions about Plaintiffs’ capture, treatment, confinement conditions, and interrogations; and they did not perform, supervise or control Plaintiffs’ interrogations," defense attorney Christopher Tompkins wrote in court documents. 

 

Both parties have 30 days to submit documents and gather evidence.


Edited by Zharkov, 25 April 2016 - 12:39 AM.

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#222 Zharkov

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Posted 20 June 2016 - 02:57 AM

Invasion Of Privacy NSA Lawsuits For Sale

 

New Intel CPUs come with a built in secret backdoor that allows remote control and all of it’s hardware even while your computer is turned off.

Hardware security export Damien Zammit revealed some startling revelations in a recent SoftPedia about the secret backdoor built in to new Intel CPUs that no one can touch or disable.

The backdoor, called the Intel Management Engine (ME) is works as a secret subsystem inside your computer’s CPU and runs constantly even when your computer is not turned on.

It works by setting up a TCP/IP server and since the subsystem has complete uncontrolled access to your computer’s hardware, including the network card and memory, it works without the knowledge of your computers operating system and can not be disabled by the OS or by your computer’s firewall.

No one outside of Intel has seen the ME source code and security experts are warning the built-in backdoor has the potential to explode into the worst root kit ever with every modern Intel based CPU becoming compromised.


http://www.blacklist.../38/38/Y/M.html


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#223 Zharkov

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Posted 20 June 2016 - 03:12 AM

Intel x86 CPUs Come with a Secret Backdoor That Nobody Can Touch or Disable
Security researchers exposes Intel Management Engine (ME)

Hardware security expert Damien Zammit says that recent Intel x86 CPUs come with a secret subsystem that works as a separate CPU inside your CPU, can’t be disabled, and nobody can review the closed proprietary code.

Called the Intel Management Engine (ME), this subsystem is literally embedded inside the x86 chipset, where it runs its own closed-source firmware.

[…]

Zammit explains that AMT runs separately from any OS a user might install, allowing access to the computers in any deployment.

Intel ME sets up a TCP/IP server, accesses memory behind your back

In order for AMT to have all these remote management features, the ME platform will access any portion of the memory without the parent x86 CPU’s knowledge and also set up a TCP/IP server on the network interface.

[…] this server can send and receive traffic regardless of whether the OS is running a firewall or not.

There are some problems that Zammit details.

[…] The first is that nobody outside Intel’s headquarters has ever seen the source code of the ME platform.

Secondly, the ME firmware is signed cryptographically with an RSA 2048 key that can’t be brute-forced in a human life (or more).

The third obstacle Zammit detailed is the fact that, on newer Intel Core2 CPU series, the ME can’t be disabled because the CPU will refuse to boot.

Fourth and last, there’s no way to audit the health of the ME firmware. A security researcher wouldn’t be able to search for any alleged NSA backdoors, nor will they be able to check if their PC’s CPU was compromised by an attacker’s rootkit.

 

Intel ME: the perfect backdoor, or the unremovable rootkit?

“[…]  Zammit wrote in an exposé for BoingBoing. “If ME’s secrets are compromised (and they will eventually be compromised by either researchers or malicious entities), then the entire ME security model will crumble, exposing every recent Intel system to the worst rootkits imaginable.”

[…]

Read Full Article: http://news.softpedi...l#ixzz4By8smrIW

Hackaday reports:

The Trouble With Intel’s Management Engine

Something is rotten in the state of Intel.

 

Over the last decade or so, Intel has dedicated enormous efforts to the security of their microcontrollers. For Intel, this is the only logical thing to do; you really, really want to know if the firmware running on a device is the firmware you want to run on a device. Anything else, and the device is wide open to balaclava-wearing hackers.

 

Intel’s first efforts toward cryptographically signed firmware began in the early 2000s with embedded security subsystems using Trusted Platform Modules (TPM). These small crypto chips, along with the BIOS, form the root of trust for modern computers. If the TPM is secure, the rest of the computer can be secure, or so the theory goes.

 

The TPM model has been shown to be vulnerable to attack, though. Intel’s solution was to add another layer of security: the (Intel) Management Engine (ME). Extremely little is known about the ME, except for some of its capabilities. The ME has complete access to all of a computer’s memory, its network connections, and every peripheral connected to a computer. It runs when the computer is hibernating, and can intercept TCP/IP traffic. Own the ME and you own the computer.

 

[…]Once the ME falls, everything with an Intel chip will fall. It is, by far, the scariest security threat today, and it’s one that’s made even worse by our own ignorance of how the ME works.

The Beginning of Intel’s Management Engine

In her talk at last month’s CCC, [Joanna Rutkowska] talked about the chain of trust found in the modern x86 computer. Trust is a necessary evil for security, and [Joanna] contrasts it with the normal meaning of the word, for which she uses “trustworthy”. If you can see the source code for your application, you can verify that it’s trustworthy. But since the application runs on top of the operating system, you have to trust the OS. Even if the OS is verified and trustworthy, it still has to trust the BIOS and firmware. As you keep digging down like this, verifying each layer, you eventually get to some part of the system that you can’t verify and just have to trust, and this root of trust is the role that the ME is trying to play.

trustedstick.png?w=400&h=238

 

[Joanna Rutkowska]’s plan for a ‘trusted stick’, offloading the root of trust to a small USB device

This root of trust on the modern computer is, quite simply, untrustworthy. Instead of a proper BIOS that can trace its origins to the first x86 computers, computers today have UEFI and Secure Boot, a measure designed to only allow signed software to run on the device. Secure Boot can be disabled from the manufacturer, and security isn’t secure if it’s optional, and even less so if there are exploits for specific implementations of UEFI. […]

[…]

What the Management Engine Is

The best description of what the Management Engine is and does doesn’t come from Intel. Instead, we rely on [Igor Skochinsky] and a talk he gave at REcon 2014. […]

 

The Intel ME has a few specific functions, and although most of these could be seen as the best tool you could give the IT guy in charge of deploying thousands of workstations in a corporate environment, there are some tools that would be very interesting avenues for an exploit. These functions include Active Managment Technology, with the ability for remote administration, provisioning, and repair, as well as functioning as a KVM. The System Defense function is the lowest-level firewall available on an Intel machine. IDE Redirection and Serial-Over-LAN allows a computer to boot over a remote drive or fix an infected OS, and the Identity Protection has an embedded one-time password for two-factor authentication. There are also functions for an ‘anti-theft’ function that disables a PC if it fails to check in to a server at some predetermined interval or if a ‘poison pill’ was delivered through the network. This anti-theft function can kill a computer, or notify the disk encryption to erase a drive’s encryption keys.

 

[….] Finding an exploit for the Intel ME will be difficult, though. While most of the firmware for the ME also resides in the Flash chip used by the BIOS, the firmware isn’t readily readable; some common functions are in an on-chip ROM and cannot be found by simply dumping the data from the Flash chip.

[…]

The Future of ME

hacker.jpg?w=253&h=254

New Intel CPUs come with a hidden backdoor that can allow hackers or the NSA to control your computer remotely even while PC is turned off

 

With a trusted processor connected directly to the memory, network, and BIOS of a computer, the ME could be like a rootkit on steroids in the wrong hands. Thus, an exploit for the ME is what all the balaclava-wearing hackers want, but so far it seems that they’ve all come up empty.

 

The best efforts that we know of again come from [Igor Skochinsky]. After finding a few confidential Intel documents a company left on an FTP server, he was able to take a look at some of the code for the ME that isn’t in the on-chip ROM and isn’t compressed by an unknown algorithm. […]

 

But unsolved doesn’t mean that people aren’t working on it. There are efforts to break the ME’s Huffman algorithm. […]

There are many researchers trying to unlock the secrets of Intel’s Management Engine, and for good reason: it’s a microcontroller that has direct access to everything in a computer.

 

Every computer with an Intel chip made in the last few years has one, and if you’re looking for the perfect vector for an attack, you won’t find anything better than the ME.

 

It is the scariest thing in your computer, and this fear is compounded by our ignorance: no one knows what the ME can actually do. And without being able to audit the code running on the ME, no one knows exactly what will happen when it is broken open.

 

The first person to find an exploit for Intel’s Management Engine will become one of the greatest security researchers of the decade. Until that happens, we’re all left in the dark, wondering what that exploit will be.


Edited by Zharkov, 20 June 2016 - 03:13 AM.

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#224 Zharkov

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Posted 17 July 2016 - 01:20 AM

Kerry said the U.S. had no indication beforehand of the coup attempt, which began as he and Russia's foreign minister were in a Russian government villa in Moscow, locked in negotiations over Syria.

"If you're planning a coup, you don't exactly advertise to your partners in NATO," Kerry said. "So it surprised everyone. It does not appear to be a very brilliantly planned or executed event."


http://hosted.ap.org...-07-16-14-00-41

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

 

What the Hell are the 17+ intel agencies doing with our tax money?

OK, so what was NSA doing while the coup planners were debating their plan?

No clue?   Were they watching porn or playing cards?

Is anyone even watching Turkey?   CIA?   Anyone?

How about the CIA hiring Russia's FSB as an independent contractor for getting intel from Turkey?

How about asking someone in the Turkey government when they expect their next military coup?

How about kicking Turkey out of NATO before they invade Syria by mistake?

 

If Turkey sent troops into Syria, would NSA be the last to know?


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#225 Zharkov

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Posted 17 July 2016 - 01:25 AM

HAS TURKEY BECOME "THE INVISIBLE NATION" FOR US INTEL SURVEILLANCE?

 

Is Erdogan truly a ghost that appears and disappears without leaving a trace?

Does he communicate by mental telepathy?

Does anyone in NSA or CIA translate Turkish?

Has any intel agency ever heard of Google translate?


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#226 Zharkov

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Posted 17 July 2016 - 04:04 PM

Rep. Pete King on Turkey: No One Saw This Coup Coming

The failed military coup in Turkey came as a surprise to the diplomatic and intelligence communities, according to New York GOP Rep. Peter King.

In an interview aired Sunday on "The Cats Roundtable," the member of the House Homeland Security Committee said no one "saw this coming."

Excerpts were posted ahead of the airing by The Hill.

"As far as I know, there was no diplomatic talk there was no intelligence talk of this coup," King said.

"We know many people in the military are dissatisfied and were strongly opposed to President Erdogan, feeling he had become a virtual dictator and he had also purged a number of top people in the military. But no one that I’m aware of saw this coup coming."

If the coup had succeeded, King said rebellious military leaders "probably would have been more effective in fighting ISIS."

"As a democracy, we can't support a military coup against democracy," King said, adding: "We have to pressure Erdogan to take a firmer position against ISIS."

"He has basically allowed thousands and thousands of Europeans to go through Turkey into Syria, fight along ISIS, be trained by ISIS, and then come back to Turkey into Europe," he said.


http://www.newsmax.c...7/17/id/739047/

 

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

 

Was the coup created to "pressure" Erdogan into blocking ISIS?

 

If so, how can anyone say that "Nobody knew"?

 

If intelligence agencies can't see a military coup coming before it happens, what good are they?


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#227 Zharkov

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Posted 18 July 2016 - 01:49 AM

US NATIONAL SECURITY RISK = Hillary Clinton

 

NSA:   If You See Something, Do Something

 

Richardson relayed reports from policymakers and intelligence sources who say Saudi money has allowed the kingdom to “infiltrate” every level of the American policymaking process. This includes, Richardson alleges, former presidents such as Jimmy Carter.

A foundation started by Carter has received many millions of dollars from Saudi Arabia as well as other Arab nations. This included huge sums from the Saudi Bin Laden group. The Bush family was also closely tied to the ruling family Saudi Arabia both financially and politically.

There have also been massive donations to the Clinton Foundation. According to recent reports, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait and Qatar have given at least $16 million and possibly as much as $40 million to the Clinton Foundation.

 

B1254_MuslimMafia.jpg

“For that amount of money, you get what you want,” said Richardson. “This is one of the looming issues when it comes to this election. We need to have discernment. We need to be aware of what’s unfolding in the Earth.”

http://www.wnd.com/2...ngton-powerful/


Edited by Zharkov, 18 July 2016 - 01:51 AM.

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#228 RobertD

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Posted 18 July 2016 - 02:02 AM

Quote: "and everyone violates laws every day without even knowing it."

 

 I conducted a study with myself on how many laws I broke every day. First law I break is when I take a shit in the morning, my toilet is 0.2L over the legal limit, so there's my first infraction. Then I warm up the truck, so there's #2, Rolling stop out the yard, #3, and by the time I get my morning Joe, I have already broke 6 to 10 laws. At the end of the day, I stop counting, probably over 50 infractions altogether. All minor stuff of course.... :gruble:


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#229 Zharkov

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Posted 18 July 2016 - 01:46 PM

A book was written about it, I think it was called, "Three Felonies A Day".

 

Americans commit at least 3 felonies every day without knowing it, simply because we have too many laws.

 

I've often thought that having too many laws could become a defense to criminal charges because it permits any prosecutor

to selectively prosecute anyone for almost anything.    If you put a person's life under a microscope, you find flaws everywhere, and some of those amount to crimes.

 

The Clintons are different - they may be committing 3 felonies an hour, every day.    Each foreign donation to their foundation should be a violation of election laws and bribery law.   Each telephone call and private meeting with a head of state violates the law since both Clintons are no longer public officials.  

 

The NSA tracks every communication.   They know who is doing what.   If they just sit on the information and do nothing, they are aiding and abetting felons in the commission of their crimes.   NSA should have copies of ALL of Hillary's e-mails, recordings of ALL of her telephone calls and money transfers to her foundation.   NSA should have enough on her to hang her and her husband for treason.    The same for Obama.   They know what he is doing.    They can see what is happening.  

 

If they see something, they need to do something.   Do a Snowden and let it all hang out.


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#230 shaktiman

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Posted 18 July 2016 - 03:14 PM

HAS TURKEY BECOME "THE INVISIBLE NATION" FOR US INTEL SURVEILLANCE?

 

 

 

I have had dealings with a few Turkish nationals who were supposedly just working folk on visas or naturalized.

 

Like everyone else they also have an intelligence presence in the US

 

What i find troubling is that there may not be many but they are well hidden and very militant without any scruples.

 

Regards.

 

BTW,

 

The Clintons are different - they may be committing 3 felonies an hour, every day

 

 

How many do they murder per hour?


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#231 Used2bgaddock

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Posted 20 July 2016 - 03:01 PM

All this shit has been going on since the good old epsilon days. The French busted us hard for using the system for international bid rigging, whoops just kidding.
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#232 Zharkov

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Posted 21 July 2016 - 08:30 PM

NSA Mistake - Watching Us When You Should Be Watching THEM!

 

WASHINGTON

The attack seemed like a garden-variety digital holdup.

A computer intruder, calling himself the “Albanian hacker,” left a message for the administrator of a website for an Illinois internet retailer: Pay two Bitcoins, or about $500 at the time, and the intruder would “remove all bugs on your shop!”

Such demands are typical among underground hackers who infect computers with malicious code and seize control of them, freeing them only after receiving a payment.

But this case was more than a surreptitious digital mugging. The trespasser had ties to the Islamic State Hacking Division, a terrorist cyber unit, and before it was over he’d put together a “kill list” for the Islamic State with the identities of 1,351 U.S. government and military personnel from the 100,000 names, credit card records and Social Security numbers he’d extracted from the host server.

The hacker operated in a gray area where criminal and terror interests blend messily to test malicious computer code, raise funds and identify Western targets, and it raises fresh concerns for U.S. businesses hit by cybercrime and for the government agents tasked with defeating it: If a business tries to make a problem quietly disappear, it may effectively be hindering government efforts to monitor terrorism. The need for collaboration between business and government on internet security has soared, even as distrust has risen between network managers and law enforcement.

Ferizi’s case is notable because his handiwork generated one of the first “kill lists” issued by the Islamic State.

The case of Ardit Ferizi, an ethnic Albanian who was raised in Kosovo, is typical of hackers who “might act on behalf of a group but are also doing it for their own profit, for criminal means,” said John P. Carlin, the assistant attorney general for national security.

Ferizi’s case is also notable because his handiwork generated one of the first “kill lists” issued by the Islamic State designed to generate fear and publicity. FBI agents used the early list of U.S. military and government employees to notify the targeted individuals. More recent lists have included thousands of ordinary civilians and even U.S. Muslims the terrorist group considers apostates.

Ferizi, 21, was extradited from Malaysia last autumn and has been held by U.S. Marshals since then. On June 15, Ferizi signed a plea agreement in Alexandria, Virginia, in which he admitted to providing material support to terrorists and to computer hacking. He also signed a statement of facts outlining details of that support.

It marked one of the federal government’s first successful cyber terrorism cases in which an individual in custody admitted a link to a foreign terrorist organization.

Ferizi’s story is gleaned from federal court records, and an interview he once gave to Infosec Institute, a Chicago-based training center for technology professionals that also does research on hackers.

100,000 Number of records Ardit Ferizi is thought to have pirated from computer servers belonging to an internet retailer.

A native of Gjakova in western Kosovo, Ferizi was largely self-trained in computers. By his late teens had formed the Kosova Hacker’s Security, a group with vague pro-Muslim objectives. He adopted the moniker @Th3Dir3ctorY, and claimed that the group had hacked systems in Serbia, Greece, Ukraine, France and the United States, including Microsoft’s Hotmail servers and a research domain operated by IBM.

In early 2015, Ferizi traveled to Malaysia to study and “in part to get better access to bandwidth” to carry out cyberattacks, Carlin said.

His tools? A Dell Latitude laptop, a second MSI laptop and computer application known as DUBrute, which allows a user to seize control of another computer remotely.

Ferizi had already established contact with Junaid Hussain, a Briton who Carlin called “one of the most notorious cyber terrorists in the world.” At the time, Hussain lived in the Syrian city of Raqqa, the de facto capital of the Islamic State. A charismatic hacker of Pakistani descent, Hussain had once run a collective, TeaMpOisoN, and had a club of fanboys.

One day last August, a system administrator at the Illinois company, which is not named in court documents, contacted the FBI about a cyber ransom demand. Appealing to the feds for help was an unusual step.

“Most companies today pay the 500 bucks and go back to business,” Carlin said at a June 28 forum at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, a public policy and research group in Washington.

Cyber ransom demands have exploded, with hackers hitting hundreds of businesses every day, encrypting hard drives and turning over the decryption key only once a payment has been made. The FBI estimates such attacks cost individuals and businesses $209 million in the first quarter of 2016.

“It’s grown extremely fast,” said Dan McNemar, director of intelligence at Binary Defense Systems, a Hudson, Ohio-based company that helps defend clients from cyberattack.

Yet those hit by the ransom attacks often are reluctant to report them.

“Companies do see a lot of risk when they consider coming out into the open about cyber incidents,” said Tristan Reed, a security analyst at Stratfor, an Austin, Texas-based global security consultancy. He noted that executives worry about reaction from shareholders and customers, and fear that government agencies won’t keep the information confidential.

Ferizi’s attack, however, was serious. He had placed malware on the company’s server that granted him “unfettered access to information” there, including all customer data, FBI agent Kevin M. Gallagher said in an affidavit.

Ferizi had scolded the company technician for trying to pry his malicious malware off the server, warning him in a message Aug. 19 – “please don’t touch my files!” – and signing off with a gleeful: “Greetings from an Albanian Hacker!”

In a separate message, he demanded two bitcoins, a type of encrypted digital currency, from the company in exchange for deleting his malicious code. He included a hyperlink to a Wikipedia page on bitcoins in case the administrator didn’t know what they were.

But Ferizi already had what he wanted. He’d spent the previous two months gathering and culling information from the company’s servers and passing the data to the Islamic State. According to Ferizi’s signed “statement of facts” in his case, the hacker searched the server for email addresses ending in “.gov” or “.mil,” indications that they belonged to civilian government or military employees.

On Aug. 11, the ISIS cyber army leader, Junaid Hussain, tweeted a link to a 30-page document containing vast details about 1,351 U.S. personnel, calling them “Crusaders” who were conducting a “bombing campaign against the muslims.” He said followers would “strike at your necks in your own lands!”

It was a coup for Hussain, but not one he’d live long to boast about.

A drone strike killed the British Islamic State hacker near Raqqa on Aug. 24. At the time, Hussain is said to have ranked No. 3 on a U.S. list of terror group members to be eliminated.

No direct link is publicly known between the drone attack and his release of the “kill list.”

A member of one private company’s digital intelligence team, who requested anonymity because he was dealing with terrorism, said of the Islamic State: “Their capabilities are 1,000 times what they were four years ago.”

But Daveed Gartenstein-Ross, a counter-terrorism expert at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies, said U.S. government cyber experts are “orders of magnitude better” than Islamic State-linked hackers.

Reed, the Stratfor analyst, said many issues make it difficult for companies to know whether intruders like the “Albanian hacker” are linked to terrorist groups. Determining the provenance of an attack or a digital ransom demand requires difficult forensics.

But since so much of public infrastructure in the United States is owned by the private sector, including electric utilities, the government and private businesses will find themselves needing to work together more often.

“It’s actually critical to collaborate,” Reed said.


http://www.mcclatchy...le90782637.html

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

 

It's even more critical to have NSA actually prevent hacks before they happen, and report those that succeed.

So why keep that secret?   

If a soldier or public official is on an ISIS kill list, don't you think they would want to know?


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#233 Zharkov

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Posted 01 August 2016 - 06:51 AM

Why did Trump sarcastically suggest that Hillary's lost e-mails, all 30 thousand of them, might be found in Moscow?

 

Can't they be found at the NSA?    Don't they keep copies of everything?  

 

Does Russian intel do a better job than the NSA?


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#234 Zharkov

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Posted 01 August 2016 - 03:31 PM

Should anyone be surprised after reading all the posts on this topic?

 

NSA Has All Of Hillary’s Deleted E-mails, It May Be The Leak”

Over a year before Edward Snowden shocked the world in the summer of 2013 with revelations that have since changed everything from domestic to foreign US policy but most of all, provided everyone a glimpse into just what the NSA truly does on a daily basis, a former NSA staffer, and now famous whistleblower, William Binney, gave excruciating detail to Wired magazine about all that Snowden would substantiate the following summer.

We covered it in a 2012 post titled “We Are This Far From A Turnkey Totalitarian State” – Big Brother Goes Live September 2013.” Not surprisingly, Binney received little attention in 2012 – his suggestions at the time were seen as preposterous and ridiculously conspiratorial. Only after the fact, did it become obvious that he was right. More importantly, in the aftermath of the Snowden revelations, what Binney has to say has become gospel.

Which is why we are confident that at least a subset of the US population will express great interest in what Binney said earlier today, when the famous whistleblower said in a radio interview on Sunday that the NSA has “all” of Hillary Clinton’s deleted emails and the FBI could gain access to them if they so desired, William Binney, a former highly placed NSA official.

Speaking on Aaron Klein’s Sunday radio program, “Aaron Klein Investigative Radio,” broadcast on New York’s AM 970 The Answer and Philadelphia’s NewsTalk 990 AM, Binney raised the possibility that the hack of the Democratic National Committee’s server was done not by Russia but by a disgruntled U.S. intelligence worker concerned about Clinton’s compromise of national security secrets via her personal email use.

Binney was an architect of the NSA’s surveillance program. He became a famed whistleblower when he resigned on October 31, 2001, after spending more than 30 years with the agency. He referenced testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee in March 2011 by then-FBI Director Robert S. Mueller in which Meuller spoke of the FBI’s ability to access various secretive databases “to track down known and suspected terrorists.”

    “Now what he (Mueller) is talking about is going into the NSA database, which is shown of course in the (Edward) Snowden material released, which shows a direct access into the NSA database by the FBI and the CIA. Which there is no oversight of by the way. So that means that NSA and a number of agencies in the U.S. government also have those emails.”

“So if the FBI really wanted them they can go into that database and get them right now,” he said of Clinton’s emails as well as DNC emails.

Asked point blank if he believed the NSA has copies of “all” of Clinton’s emails, including the deleted correspondence, Binney confirmed.

“Yes,” he responded. “That would be my point. They have them all and the FBI can get them right there.”

Binney then went on to speculate about something even more shocking: that the hack of the DNC could have been coordinated by someone inside the U.S. intelligence community angry over Clinton’s compromise of national security data with her email use.

    And the other point is that Hillary, according to an article published by the Observer in March of this year, has a problem with NSA because she compromised Gamma material.  Now that is the most sensitive material at NSA. And so there were a number of NSA officials complaining to the press or to the people who wrote the article that she did that. She lifted the material that was in her emails directly out of Gamma reporting. That is a direct compromise of the most sensitive material at the NSA. So she’s got a real problem there. So there are many people who have problems with what she has done in the past. So I don’t necessarily look at the Russians as the only one(s) who got into those emails.

According to Klein, the GAMMA classification is defined as follows: “GAMMA compartment, which is an NSA handling caveat that is applied to extraordinarily sensitive information (for instance, decrypted conversations between top foreign leadership, as this was).”

It would be truly ironic if instead of the Democrat hack originating at the Kremlin, as the media and Hillary have already concluded is the case without any actual proof, the true source of Hillary’s hacked and leaked emails is none other than an unknown crusader at the the NSA itself, another “Snowden”, determined to see the downfall of Clinton after her actions exposed national security to unprecedented risk for years. Alas we will never know: as we reported yesterday, it is the NSA that has been tasked with determining if Putin was responsible. We doubt it will find anything, however we are certain that it won’t find itself to be the culprit.


http://www.prisonpla...e-the-leak.html

 

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

 

Another question - can Hillary (as president-alleged) order the NSA to purge and "disappear" all of their communications and records related to her, Bill Clinton, and the Clinton Foundation?    Or have they already done that?    Do NSA employees comply with orders from the president?   Did Nazis salute Hitler?

 

Does NSA have ANY Clinton records at all?


Edited by Zharkov, 01 August 2016 - 04:39 PM.

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#235 shaktiman

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Posted 01 August 2016 - 04:41 PM

Does Russian intel do a better job than the NSA?

 

 

 

Yes.

 

“NSA Has All Of Hillary’s Deleted E-mails, It May Be The Leak”

 

 

Or other Intelligence agencies acting as a whole or a faction thereof;

 

Personally, I still say it's Santa.

 

But, why isn't Hillary Harlot put on the carpet for violating a judge's order. You know the "spoliation" stuff better than me Zharkov and the Motions to Compel and the Rules to Show Cause and so on ad pukeium.

 

Regards.


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#236 Zharkov

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Posted 01 August 2016 - 04:54 PM

 

 

Yes.

 

 

Or other Intelligence agencies acting as a whole or a faction thereof;

 

Personally, I still say it's Santa.

 

But, why isn't Hillary Harlot put on the carpet for violating a judge's order. You know the "spoliation" stuff better than me Zharkov and the Motions to Compel and the Rules to Show Cause and so on ad pukeium.

 

Regards.

 

I think Larry Klayman is looking into the possibility of evidence destruction in his civil case.   Proving it isn't easy because it takes testimony that the evidence existed and was destroyed, and then it takes an extra copy of it to prove that it was evidence after all.

 

Clinton tactics involve not remembering anything.   If they can't remember if evidence existed or whether it was destroyed, then it requires an honest witness willing to testify.   Clintons are usually careful not to allow unreliable people to know the details.   They deliberately pick people to help them who are willing to lie.   People willing to stuff Library of Congress documents in their socks to remove them from public view.    People willing to go to jail rather than talk.

 

I really admire Larry Klayman for his bravery in taking on cases that can be incredibly dangerous for other lawyers to handle.   He manages to get the goods on the Clintons, one way or another, without getting blasted with financial sanctions by a federal judge.    Another lawyer who took on a similar case got sanctioned for $545,000.00 by a federal judge.   He appealed and lost.   And he was never in the news again.


Edited by Zharkov, 01 August 2016 - 04:54 PM.

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#237 shaktiman

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Posted 01 August 2016 - 08:37 PM

Another lawyer who took on a similar case got sanctioned for $545,000.00 by a federal judge.

 

Probably happens in many cases.

 

Nonetheless, the Clintons can't destroy what we have here in NC. There are documents here, on flash drives, on two computers, in other attorney's files and more. They can't get a fake dismissal on this one but they are threatening as i write.

 

I have no trepidation of sanctions. I am a well versed logician and we have them cold.

 

What we can do now, up against 5 lawyers of record and several more involved  and a slew of others will be interesting. No mindful judge can see all of this and not have a a series of red flags go up. The public, except for a few in the press thus far incognito, have no idea of what this little NC case is about. I can not afford to be secretive when playing with the Clinton Crime Organization. They hate bad press coming to light. And more will. They are desperate because this case in NC is far more damning.

 

They either follow the rules of Civil Procedure, Discovery, and more, or else this cause can be back without a fear of tolling of the statute of limitations i.e. fraud on the court.

 

In addition, we now have another case in the same arena involving them in another incident. We have a green light on the filing a second prong.

 

Let them read it on Pravda.

 

Two of their attorneys thus far, we have caught filing false documents before the State court to prejudice the federal court. They have committed felonies as defined by NC statutes. There is more evidence that may now ensue involving public corruption and the appearance of a quid pro quo vis a vis bribery of a state court commissioner, possibly two, maybe three.

 

I did speak with Judicial Watch - they say they are not with Klayman.

 

Of course even here in NC with NY lawyers involved one must be mindful exactly whose side the attorney is on. I understand the NC Bar is involved already and more.

 

Using the courts to destroy the other party and tilt a level playing field has never been allowed in an honest courtroom.

 

It is getting very hot in this case here in NC.

 

They set up a false arrest of me about four days ago. It didn't work. I've seen it too many times.

 

More to come......

 

Best regards.


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#238 Zharkov

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Posted 01 August 2016 - 11:18 PM

assange-hillary-575x444.jpg

 

MAYBE JULIAN ASSANGE SHOULD BE GETTING THE MONEY BUDGETED FOR THE NSA?

 

He found the missing Clinton e-mails.


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#239 Zharkov

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Posted 01 August 2016 - 11:22 PM

NSA Sickness Spreads Around The World 

A World Of Paranoid Officials and Governments

 

LIMA, Peru (AP) — It was a national scandal. Peru's then-vice president accused two domestic intelligence agents of staking her out. Then, a top congressman blamed the spy agency for a break-in at his office. News stories showed the agency had collected data on hundreds of influential Peruvians.

Yet after last year's outrage, which forced out the prime minister and froze its intelligence-gathering, the spy service went ahead with a $22 million program capable of snooping on thousands of Peruvians at a time. Peru — a top cocaine-producing nation — joined the ranks of world governments that have added commercial spyware to their arsenals.

The purchase from Israeli-American company Verint Systems, chronicled in documents obtained by The Associated Press, offers a rare, behind-the-scenes look into how easy it is for a country to purchase and install off-the-shelf surveillance equipment. The software allows governments to intercept voice calls, text messages and emails.

Except for blacklisted nations like Syria and North Korea, there is little to stop governments that routinely violate basic rights from obtaining the same so-called "lawful intercept" tools that have been sold to Western police and spy agencies.

 

People tracked by the technology have been beaten, jailed and tortured, according to human rights groups.

Targets identified by the AP include a blogger in the repressive Central Asian republic of Uzbekistan, opposition activists in the war-ravaged African nation of South Sudan, and politicians and reporters in oil-rich Trinidad and Tobago in the Caribbean.

"The status quo is completely unacceptable," said Marietje Schaake, a European Union lawmaker pushing for greater oversight. "The fact that this market is almost completely unregulated is very disturbing."

The Verint documents that AP obtained in Peru, including training manuals, contracts, invoices and emails, offer more detail than previously available on the inner workings of a highly secretive industry.

"There is just so little reliable data on this," said Edin Omanovic, a researcher at Privacy International, a London-based advocacy group. "These commercial tools are being used in a strategic and offensive way in much the same way that military tools are used."

The scope and sophistication revealed in the Peru documents approximates, on a small scale, U.S. and British surveillance programs catalogued in 2013 by former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden. That trove showed how the U.S. government collected the phone records of millions of Americans, few suspected of crimes. Even after some reforms, there is still much to be done in the U.S. and abroad to rein in Big Brother, privacy advocates say.

Reached at Verint's corporate headquarters in Melville, New York, an assistant to CEO Dan Bodner said the company would have no comment. "We typically don't comment to reporters," said Barbara Costa.

Verint and its main competitors hail from nations with well-funded spy agencies, including the United States, Israel, Britain and Germany, and have operated with limited oversight.

With more than $1 billion in yearly sales, Verint is a major, longtime player in an industry whose secrecy makes its size difficult to quantify.

 

Verint Systems Ltd., the subsidiary that sold the surveillance package to Peru, is based in Herzliya, Israel, outside Tel Aviv.

In regulatory filings, the parent corporation boasts upward of 10,000 customers in more than 180 countries, including most of the world's largest companies and U.S. law-enforcement agencies.

 

The company says its products help businesses run better and "make the world a safer place." In 2007, Verint provided Mexico with a U.S.-funded, $3 million surveillance platform aimed at fighting drug cartels.

Surveillance sales account for about a third of its business. However, the company discloses little about those products, which it says collect and parse massive data sets to "detect, investigate and neutralize threats."

It also does not identify its law enforcement and intelligence agency clients, but the AP independently confirmed through interviews and documents that it has sales in countries including Australia, Brazil, the United States, Mexico, Colombia and Switzerland.

About half of Verint's surveillance dealings are in the developing world, said analyst Jeff Kessler of Imperial Capital in New York.

The Peru installation — known as Pisco, a nod to the local brandy — illustrates how the private surveillance industry has piggybacked on multibillion-dollar government research in the West. Many security experts who honed their skills in Israel's military have gone to work in the private sector, effectively putting their tech chops at the service of less sophisticated nations for a fraction of the cost.

Like spy tools wielded by larger nations, Pisco lets officials "intercept and monitor" satellite networks that carry voice and data traffic, potentially putting private communications of millions of Peruvians at risk.

A software manual offers step-by-step instructions on how to intercept those communications with Verint equipment: Connect to a satellite, identify the callers, then "open a voice product" — their jargon for a phone call.

Next on the flow chart:

"Voice is heard."

___

'PINPOINT NEW TARGETS OF INTEREST'

Since the early 2000s, Verint and top competitor Nice Systems have sold mass surveillance products to the secret police in Uzbekistan, according to extensive research by Mari Bastashevski for Privacy International. She found the companies also sold such systems to neighboring Kazakhstan, also a tightly governed nation.

Israeli technicians from both companies have rotated in and out of Tashkent, the Uzbek capital, for tech support and maintenance, Bastashevski found. Nice Systems sold its surveillance business to Israeli defense heavyweight Elbit Systems last year.

That equipment has let Uzbek secret police quickly locate and arrest people who discuss sensitive information on the phone or via email, dissidents say.

"The authorities' main weapon is people's fear,"

said Tulkin Karayev, a Sweden-based exile. "Freedom of speech, freedom of expression — all this is banned."

Asked by the AP whether Nice Systems' sales had enabled political repression, Elbit spokeswoman Dalia Rosen would not comment. "We follow the leading standards of corporate governance and focus on ethical behavior in our business dealings," she said.

 

 

The price of dissent is arbitrary detention
Over the past two decades, Uzbekistan has "imprisoned thousands to enforce repressive rule," Human Rights Watch reported last year. The price of dissent is arbitrary detention, forced labor and torture, the group said. A report submitted to the U.N. by three rights groups deemed torture by the secret police systematic, unpunished and encouraged.

Three years ago, metal worker Kudrat Rasulov reached out to Karayev from Uzbekistan via Facebook seeking advice on how he could help promote free expression in his country. The exile said he suggested that Rasulov, now 46, write critical commentary on local media reports. Rasulov's weekly reports were then published online under a pseudonym. Rasulov thought he was being careful. He created a new email account for every article he sent, and the two men discussed the articles over Skype. But after six months, Rasulov was arrested. He is serving an 8-year-prison sentence for subversion.

Karayev believes Rasulov was undone by surveillance, and Human Rights Watch agreed. The court's sentence found he was convicted based in part on his Skype communications and contact with Karayev, the group said in a report.

"They were reading Skype. They were listening to his phone calls. That's the way they build their cases,"

said Steve Swerdlow, the report's author.

In Colombia, Verint has racked up millions in sales. As recently as 2015, U.S. customs officials funded maintenance for a wiretapping system, according to government contracts. Nearly a decade ago, its products were abused by officials who were later sacked for illegal eavesdropping, senior police and prosecutors told the AP at the time, speaking on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak publicly about the matter.

Like the United States, most countries require court orders to use the technology. But where rule of law is weak, abuse is not uncommon.

The Caribbean nation of Trinidad and Tobago saw a government fall after a wiretapping scandal involving Verint-supplied equipment. In 2009, a total of 53 people, including politicians and journalists, were illegally monitored, according to a former senior security official who asked not to be named for fear of reprisal. The Verint equipment remains operative, though now a court order is needed to use it.

One piece of the Verint product mix that Trinidad and Tobago bought is Vantage Broadway.

 

A promotional brochure published by Israel's defense ministry for a 2014 trade show in India describes it as data-analysis and pattern-seeking software. It pairs with a product called Reliant to "intercept, filter and analyze huge volumes of Internet, voice and satellite communication." The package Peru bought includes both Reliant and Vantage, documents show.

The little regulation that exists in the commercial mass-surveillance trade falls under a non-binding international arms export-control regime called the Wassenaar Arrangement. In December 2013, it was amended to add monitoring products like Reliant and Vantage and "attack-ware" that breaks into smartphones and computers and turns them into listening posts.

The United States has not ratified the amendment; the federal Commerce Department proposed rules that raised objections in Silicon Valley. Israel says it is complying, and the European Union ratified the update. But Schaake, the EU lawmaker, said its 28 member states act independently and

"technologies continue to be exported to countries that are known human rights violators."

Surveillance technology from Israel, meanwhile, is being used in South Sudan, where a 2 ½-year-old civil war has claimed tens of thousands of lives, a panel of U.N. experts reported in January. U.N. and human rights groups say

the government deploys it to track down, jail and torture dissidents and journalists.

The ability of South Sudan's intelligence agency "to identify and illegally apprehend individuals has been significantly enhanced" through the acquisition of "additional communications interception equipment from Israel," the U.N. experts wrote.

They did not name the suppliers, and a government spokesman declined to discuss the issue. While there is no direct evidence that Verint is a supplier, an AP reporter confirmed the names of two company employees on a flight in May from Ethiopia to the South Sudanese capital of Juba. Typing on a laptop, one was working on a presentation that named the three telecoms that operate in the country.

Verint did not respond to questions about whether it supplied surveillance technology to South Sudan.

An activist jailed for four months in Juba said his interrogators spoke openly about tapping his phone, played recordings of him in intercepted phone conversations and showed him emails he had sent. He spoke to the AP on condition he not be identified, saying he fears for his life.

Joseph Bakosoro, a former South Sudanese state governor who was also held without charge for four months, said his interrogators played for him a voicemail that had been left on his cellphone. They claimed it was evidence he backed rebels.

Bakosoro said the voicemail proved only that he was being bugged.

His interrogators didn't hide that.

"They told me they are monitoring me," he said. "They are monitoring my phone, and they are monitoring everyone, so whatever we say on the telephone, they are monitoring."

___

'WHO WILL GUARD THE GUARDS?'

Three years after Peru acquired the Verint package, it's not yet up and running, Carlos Basombrio, the incoming interior minister said just before taking office last week. "When it becomes operative, it will be used against organized crime (in coordination) with judges and prosecutors."

Located in a three-story building next to the country's DINI spy agency, Pisco sits on a Lima military base off-limits to the public. It can track 5,000 individual targets and simultaneously record the communications of 300 people, according to agency documents, with eight listening rooms and parabolic antennae affixed outside to capture satellite downlinks.

Control of Pisco was shifted to the national police after the spying scandal that crippled the intelligence agency. Verint sent Israeli personnel to train Peruvian operators, adding eight months of instruction at the host government's request, records show.

One major eavesdropping tool has, however, been active in Peru since October. It can physically track any phone in real time using geolocation. Under a July 2015 decree, police can locate phones without a court order, but would need one to listen in.

Government officials wouldn't offer details on what software was being used to track cellphones. But two months before the decree, DINI officials said payment had been authorized for a Verint geolocation product called SkyLock. That software enables phone-tracking within the country, and a premium version can pinpoint any mobile phone in most countries.

All four Peruvian phone companies agreed to cooperate on geolocation, signing a pact with the government the details of which were not disclosed.

Civil libertarians consider warrantless geolocation a dangerous invasion of privacy, especially in a nation with pervasive public corruption. Peru's incoming congress is dominated by Fuerza Popular, a party associated with imprisoned former President Alberto Fujimori. He ran one of the most corrupt Latin American regimes in recent history.

In July 2015, the Verint surveillance platform got caught in the chaos of Peruvian politics.

Word of the purchase was leaked, triggering a government audit. The Miami-based Verint vice president who made the sale, Shefi Paz, complained about the phone companies' apparent foot-dragging in emails and letters to DINI officials. They weren't making themselves available for meetings.

"Verint should not have to suffer from political delays," Paz wrote . Reached by phone, Paz declined to comment.

The eavesdropping products Verint and its peers sell play an important role in fighting terrorism, said Ika Balzam, a former employee of both Verint and Nice. That is a common industry claim, echoed by politicians.

And yet, Balzam acknowledged, there are no guarantees that nation-states won't abuse surveillance tools.

"There is a saying," Balzam said: "'Who will guard the guards?'"


___

Associated Press writer Frank Bajak reported this story in Lima and AP writer Jack Gillum reported from Washington. AP writers Maria Danilova in Washington; Josef Federman in Jerusalem; Jason Patinkin in Juba, South Sudan; Tony Fraser in Port-of-Spain, Trinidad and Tobago; Jamey Keaten in Geneva and Kristen Gelineau in Sydney contributed to this report.

___

Documents about the Peru program: http://bit.ly/2awHVE0

___

http://bigstory.ap.o...toring-everyone


Edited by Zharkov, 02 August 2016 - 02:35 PM.

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#240 Zharkov

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Posted 04 August 2016 - 02:58 PM

LESSONS FROM THE "DEEP STATE"

 

On the eve of the Democratic National Convention, WikiLeaks — the courageous international organization dedicated to governmental transparency — exposed hundreds of internal emails circulated among senior staff of the Democratic National Committee during the past 18 months.

At a time when Democratic Party officials were publicly professing neutrality during the party’s presidential primaries, the DNC’s internal emails showed a pattern of distinct bias toward the candidacy of former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and a marked prejudice toward the candidacy of Sen. Bernie Sanders. Some of the emails were raw in their tone, and some could fairly be characterized as failing to respect Sanders’ Jewish heritage.

The revelation caused a public uproar during the weekend preceding the opening of the Democratic convention in Philadelphia last week, and it caused the DNC to ask its own chairwoman, Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, to resign. When she declined to do so, President Barack Obama personally intervened and implored her to leave. She submitted to the president’s wishes, gave up her public role as chair of the convention and eventually resigned as chair of the DNC late last week.

In order to take everyone’s eyes off this intrusive and uncomfortable bouncing ball, the leadership of the DNC, in conjunction with officials of the Clinton campaign, blamed the release of the DNC emails on hackers employed by Russian intelligence agents. Many in the media picked up this juicy story and repeated it all last week.

Clinton promptly named Wasserman Schultz as a campaign consultant and complained that the Russians are trying to influence the presidential election. She did not complain about the unfairness manifested in the emails, complete with their religious prejudice; she only complained about Russian President Vladimir Putin’s helping Donald Trump.

But the Russians had nothing to do with it.

Last week, William Binney, a 30-year career official at the National Security Agency turned whistleblower, revealed the unthinkable. Binney, who devised the software that the NSA has used to capture the contents of emails and cellphone conversations of all in America but resigned from the NSA because of the unlawful and unconstitutional manner in which the software was used, told a Philadelphia radio audience that the DNC hacking was most likely done by NSA agents.

Why would the NSA hack into DNC computers, and why would the NSA leak what its agents saw?

Here is where the deep state meets the political world. The deep state consists of intelligence, military, law enforcement and administrative agency personnel who aggressively protect their own interests, which transcend elections. Stated differently, many of these folks remain in opaque positions of power, and the governmental departments and agencies for which they work continue to expand, no matter which party wins the White House or controls Congress.

The deep state stays in power by a variety of means, some of which are lawful and not the least of which was visited upon the DNC last week. Binney knows the inside workings of NSA computers because he designed them. He knows how easy it would have been for any of the NSA’s 60,000 agents, many of whom have great antipathy toward Clinton, to employ their skills to frustrate her drive toward the presidency.

The intelligence community’s antipathy toward Clinton has two general sources.

 

One is her misuse of emails containing state secrets. Among the top-secret emails that the FBI discovered on Clinton’s non-secure private servers were some that revealed the names of U.S. intelligence agents operating undercover in the Middle East. Because Clinton emailed secrets to others who the FBI found were hacked by hostile foreign intelligence services and because she used a non-secure mobile email device while inside the territories of hostile governments, her “extremely careless” use of her emails resulted in the termination of the undercover work of those whose cover she caused to be revealed. Many in the intelligence community also suspect that in some cases, U.S. undercover agents lost their lives because Clinton failed to keep their identities secret.

The other source of intelligence community antipathy to Clinton stems from her secret war waged against the late Libyan strongman, Col. Moammar Gadhafi. When she waged that war — using intelligence, not military, personnel — with the approval of the president and a dozen members of Congress, she exercised her authority as secretary of state to grant exemptions to a U.N. arms embargo of Libya. She wanted Libyan militias to have heavy-duty, military-grade arms with which to topple the Libyan government.

But the CIA and others warned her that she was arming terrorist groups, which was potentially lethal for some American intelligence personnel and which is a felony under federal law. One of those groups may have used Clinton-authorized, embargo-free weapons to assassinate Christopher Stevens, the U.S. ambassador to Libya, at Benghazi. Clinton disregarded the CIA’s advice and didn’t worry about anyone’s finding out about it because she thought her emails would remain secret.

Binney’s conclusion that the NSA and not the Russians hacked the DNC is further supported by official White House silence. Last year, when Chinese intelligence agents hacked U.S. government computers and accessed personnel records of millions of federal government employees, the White House lodged long and loud protests with Beijing. This time, there have been no such protests to the Kremlin.

What does all this tell us?

It tells us that Hillary Clinton continues to be the queen of deception. It tells us that some of those in whose hands we repose our freedom for safekeeping do not wish to see her in the White House because of her demonstrated lawlessness and indifference to their work. And it recalls to our attention the danger and power of the deep state and its willingness to break the laws it has sworn to uphold.


https://www.lewrockw...ons-deep-state/

 

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

 

NSA did the right thing this time in exposing the Clinton/Democrat deceptions.   Good work.   But don't stop.

 

You've got the goods on her.    Let it all hang out, or she will hang you if she becomes POTUS.

 

She has friends inside the agency, she knows where it's leaking.  

 

It is now a matter of agency self-preservation to disclose the rest of her story.

 

The American voters deserve to know before they vote, not afterward.


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