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NSA's Dirty Work Exposed

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#261 Zharkov

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Posted 06 October 2016 - 05:40 AM

How about monitoring America's domestic enemy?

You know, the party that is against liberty and freedom of speech?

 

Democrat Party = Domestic Enemy

 

"Once again, Commissioner Ravel has chosen to inject divisive ad hominem rhetoric into an honest debate about the scope of press freedom in America," he said.

 

"Instead of name-calling, Commissioner Ravel should explain why she wants to assert the power as a government official to ban books and motion pictures. She also owes an explanation for what appears to be a prejudice toward press organizations like Fox News, Washington Examiner and Daily Caller."

 

http://www.washingto...article/2603712


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#262 Zharkov

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Posted 06 October 2016 - 02:32 PM

Would it be too much to expect NSA to find these guys before they kill people, and let ICE know where they are?   Hmmm?

 

Exclusive: Dozens of Afghan troops missing from military training in U.S.

Forty-four Afghan troops visiting the United States for military training have gone missing in less than two years, presumably in an effort to live and work illegally in America, Pentagon officials said.

Although the number of disappearances is relatively small -- some 2,200 Afghan troops have received military training in the United States since 2007 -- the incidents raise questions about security and screening procedures for the programs.

They are also potentially embarrassing for U.S. President Barack Obama's administration, which has spent billions of dollars training Afghan troops as Washington seeks to extricate itself from the costly, 15-year-old war. The disclosure could fuel criticism by supporters of Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump, who has accused the Obama administration of failing to properly vet immigrants from Muslim-majority countries and has pledged a much tougher stance if he wins.

While other foreign troops on U.S. military training visits have sometimes run away, a U.S. defense official said that the frequency of Afghan troops going missing was concerning and "out of the ordinary."

http://www.reuters.c...y-idUSKCN1260A1


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#263 Zharkov

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Posted 21 October 2016 - 01:06 AM

US Police State Tightens Its Death Grip On Americans

NSA Can Access More Phone Data Than Ever

One of the reforms designed to rein in the surveillance authorities of the National Security Agency has perhaps inadvertently solved a technical problem for the spy outfit and granted it potential access to much more data than before, a former top official told ABC News.

Before the signing of the USA Freedom Act in June 2015, one of the NSA's most controversial programs was the mass collection of telephonic metadata from millions of Americans — the information about calls, including the telephone numbers involved, the time and the duration but not the calls' content — under a broad interpretation of the Patriot Act's Section 215. From this large "haystack," as officials have called it, NSA analysts could get approval to run queries on specific numbers purportedly linked to international terrorism investigations.

The problem for the NSA was that the haystack was only about 30 percent as big as it should've been; the NSA database was missing a lot of data. As The Washington Post reported in 2014, the agency was not getting information from all wireless carriers and it also couldn't handle the deluge of data that was coming in.

On the technical side, Chris Inglis, who served as the NSA's deputy director until January 2014, recently told ABC News that when major telecommunications companies previously handed over customer records, the NSA "just didn't ingest all of it."

"[NSA officials] were trying to make sure they were doing it exactly right," he said, meaning making sure that the data was being pulled in according to existing privacy policies. The metadata also came in various forms from the different companies, so the NSA had to reformat much of it before loading it into a searchable database.

Both hurdles meant that the NSA couldn't keep up, and of all the metadata the agency wanted to be available for specific searches internally, only about a third of it actually was.

But then the USA Freedom Act was signed into law, and now Inglis said, all that is "somebody else's problem."

The USA Freedom Act ended the NSA's bulk collection of metadata but charged the telecommunications companies with keeping the data on hand. The NSA and other U.S. government agencies now must request information about specific phone numbers or other identifying elements from the telecommunications companies after going through the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) court and arguing that there is a "reasonable, articulable suspicion" that the number is associated with international terrorism.

As a result, the NSA no longer has to worry about keeping up its own database and, according to Inglis, the percentage of available records has shot up from 30 percent to virtually 100 percent. Rather than one internal, incomplete database, the NSA can now query any of several complete ones.

The new system "guarantees that the NSA can have access to all of it," Inglis said.

NSA general counsel Glenn Gerstell made a brief reference to the increased capacity in a post for the Lawfare blog in January after terrorist attacks at home and abroad.

"Largely overlooked in the debate that has ensued in the wake of recent attacks is the fact that under the new arrangement, our national security professionals will have access to a greater volume of call records subject to query in a way that is consistent with our regard for civil liberties," he wrote.

Mark Rumold, a senior staff attorney at the Electronic Frontier Foundation, told ABC News he doesn't have much of a problem with the NSA's wider access to telephone data, since now the agency has to go through a "legitimate" system with "procedural protections" before jumping into the databases.

"Their ability to obtain records has broadened, but by all accounts, they're collecting a far narrower pool of data than they were initially," he said, referring to returns on specific searches. "They can use a type of legal process with a broader spectrum of providers than earlier. To me, that isn't like a strike against it. That's almost something in favor of it, because we've gone through this public process, we've had this debate, and this is where we settled on the scope of the authority we were going to give them."

Rumold said he's still concerned about the NSA's ability to get information on phone numbers linked to a number in question — up to two "hops" away — but he said the USA Freedom Act "remains a step in the right direction."

The trade-off of the new system, according to Inglis, is in the efficiency of the searches. Whereas in the past the NSA could instantaneously run approved searches of its database, now the agency must approach each telecommunications company to ask about a number and then wait for a response.

In his January post Gerstell acknowledged concerns that the new approach could be "too cumbersome to be effective" and said the NSA will report to Congress on how the arrangement is working. A representative for the NSA declined to tell ABC News if any problems have been encountered so far, and Rumold noted there has been no public evidence of any issues.

Inglis said he isn't terribly concerned if the searches are a little slower. It's a small price to pay, he said, for what he called an "additional safeguard" that could increase the public's confidence in what the NSA is and how it operates.

http://abcnews.go.co...ory?id=42892417


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#264 Zharkov

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Posted 21 October 2016 - 01:16 AM

Why does the US government use labels for its laws that are the exact opposite of what the law actually does?

 

Patriot Act = Exact opposite, absolute treason against the 4th & 5th Amendments of the US Constitution.

 

US Freedom Act = Exact opposite, designed to end privacy in communications resulting in self-censoring and an end to freedom of speech.

 

Every new "law" is a dictate of the will of the elite and against the will of the people.    Nobody in America wants less freedom for themselves.

 

Trump should have said "MAKE AMERICANS FREE AGAIN".


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#265 Zharkov

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Posted 25 October 2016 - 02:21 PM

Project Hemisphere - NSA = AT&T

 

Spying on Americans for Profit, New Documents Reveal

AT&T, the telecom giant is doing NSA-style work for law enforcement—without a warrant—and earning millions of dollars a year from taxpayers.

On Nov. 11, 2013, Victorville, California, sheriff’s deputies and a coroner responded to a motorcyclist’s report of human remains outside of town.

They identified the partially bleached skull of a child, and later discovered the remains of the McStay family who had been missing for the past three years. Joseph, 40, his wife Summer, 43, Gianni, 4, and Joseph Jr., 3, had been bludgeoned to death and buried in shallow graves in the desert.

Investigators long suspected Charles Merritt in the family’s disappearance, interviewing him days after they went missing. Merritt was McStay’s business partner and the last person known to see him alive. Merritt had also borrowed $30,000 from McStay to cover a gambling debt, a mutual business partner told police. None of it was enough to make an arrest.

Even after the gravesite was discovered and McStay’s DNA was found inside Merritt’s vehicle, police were far from pinning the quadruple homicide on him.

Until they turned to Project Hemisphere.

Hemisphere is a secretive program run by AT&T that searches trillions of call records and analyzes cellular data to determine where a target is located, with whom he speaks, and potentially why.

“Merritt was in a position to access the cellular telephone tower northeast of the McStay family gravesite on February 6th, 2010, two days after the family disappeared,” an affidavit for his girlfriend’s call records reports Hemisphere finding (PDF). Merritt was arrested almost a year to the date after the McStay family’s remains were discovered, and is awaiting trial for the murders.

In 2013, Hemisphere was revealed by The New York Times and described only within a Powerpoint presentation made by the Drug Enforcement Administration. The Times described it as a “partnership” between AT&T and the U.S. government; the Justice Department said it was an essential, and prudently deployed, counter-narcotics tool.

However, AT&T’s own documentation—reported here by The Daily Beast for the first time—shows Hemisphere was used far beyond the war on drugs to include everything from investigations of homicide to Medicaid fraud.

 

Project Hemisphere

Hemisphere isn’t a “partnership” but rather a product AT&T developed, marketed, and sold at a cost of millions of dollars per year to taxpayers. No warrant is required to make use of the company’s massive trove of data, according to AT&T documents, only a promise from law enforcement to not disclose Hemisphere if an investigation using it becomes public.

These new revelations come as the company seeks to acquire Time Warner in the face of vocal opposition saying the deal would be bad for consumers. Donald Trump told supporters over the weekend he would kill the acquisition if he’s elected president; Hillary Clinton has urged regulators to scrutinize the deal.

While telecommunications companies are legally obligated to hand over records, AT&T appears to have gone much further to make the enterprise profitable, according to ACLU technology policy analyst Christopher Soghoian.

“Companies have to give this data to law enforcement upon request, if they have it. AT&T doesn’t have to data-mine its database to help police come up with new numbers to investigate,” Soghoian said.

AT&T has a unique power to extract information from its metadata because it retains so much of it. The company owns more than three-quarters of U.S. landline switches, and the second largest share of the nation’s wireless infrastructure and cellphone towers, behind Verizon. AT&T retains its cell tower data going back to July 2008, longer than other providers. Verizon holds records for a year and Sprint for 18 months, according to a 2011 retention schedule obtained by The Daily Beast.

The disclosure of Hemisphere was not the first time AT&T has been caught working with law enforcement above and beyond what the law requires.

(E-mail a complaint to Hillary about this?    Get The Beast In Your Inbox!)

Special cooperation with the government to conduct surveillance dates back to at least 2003, when AT&T ordered technician Mark Klein to help the National Security Agency install a bug directly into its main San Francisco internet exchange point, Room 641A. The company invented a programming language to mine its own records for surveillance, and in 2007 came under fire for handing these mined records over to the FBI. That same year Hemisphere was born.

By 2013, it was deployed to three DEA High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA) Investigative Support Centers, according to the Times. Today, Hemisphere is used in at least 28 of these intelligence centers across the country, documents show. The centers are staffed by federal agents as well as local law enforcement; one center is the Los Angeles Regional Criminal Information Clearinghouse, where Merritt’s number was sent for analysis.

Analysis is done by AT&T employees on behalf of law enforcement clients through these intelligence centers, but performed at another location in the area. At no point does law enforcement directly access AT&T’s data.

A statement of work from 2014 shows how hush-hush AT&T wants to keep Hemisphere.

“The Government agency agrees not to use the data as evidence in any judicial or administrative proceedings unless there is no other available and admissible probative evidence,” it says.

But those charged with a crime are entitled to know the evidence against them come trial. Adam Schwartz, staff attorney for activist group Electronic Frontier Foundation, said that means AT&T leaves investigators no choice but to construct a false investigative narrative to hide how they use Hemisphere if they plan to prosecute anyone.

Once AT&T provides a lead through Hemisphere, then investigators use routine police work, like getting a court order for a wiretap or following a suspect around, to provide the same evidence for the purpose of prosecution. This is known as “parallel construction.”

“This document here is striking,” Schwartz told The Daily Beast. “I’ve seen documents produced by the government regarding Hemisphere, but this is the first time I’ve seen an AT&T document which requires parallel construction in a service to government. It’s very troubling and not the way law enforcement should work in this country.”

The federal government reimburses municipalities for the expense of Hemisphere through the same grant program that is blamed for police militarization by paying for military gear like Bearcat vehicles.

“At a minimum there is a very serious question whether they should be doing it without a warrant. A benefit to the parallel construction is they never have to face that crucible.

 

Then the judge, the defendant, the general public, the media, and elected officials never know that AT&T and police across America funded by the White House are using the world’s largest metadata database to surveil people,” Schwartz said.

The EFF, American Civil Liberties Union, and Electronic Privacy Information Center have all expressed concern that surveillance using Hemisphere is unconstitutionally invasive, and have sought more information on the program, with little success. The EFF is currently awaiting a judge’s ruling on its Freedom of Information Act suit against the Department of Justice for Hemisphere documentation.

AT&T spokesperson Fletcher Cook told The Daily Beast via an email that there is “no special database,” and that the only additional service AT&T provides for Atlanta’s intelligence center is dedicated personnel to speed up requests.

“Like other communications companies, if a government agency seeks customer call records through a subpoena, court order or other mandatory legal process, we are required by law to provide this non-content information, such as the phone numbers and the date and time of calls,” AT&T’s statement said.

AT&T referred The Daily Beast to this statement in response to all further questions about the project and its use.

Soghoian said AT&T is being misleading.

“They say they only cooperate with law enforcement as required, and frankly, that’s offensive when they are mining the data of millions of innocent people, and really built a business and services around the needs of law enforcement,” he said.

Sheriff and police departments pay from $100,000 to upward of $1 million a year or more for Hemisphere access. Harris County, Texas, home to Houston, made its inaugural payment to AT&T of $77,924 in 2007, according to a contract reviewed by The Daily Beast. Four years later, the county’s Hemisphere bill had increased more than tenfold to $940,000.

“Did you see that movie Field of Dreams?” Soghoian asked. “It’s like that line, ‘if you build it, they will come.’ Once a company creates a huge surveillance apparatus like this and provides it to law enforcement, they then have to provide it whenever the government asks. They’ve developed this massive program and of course they’re going to sell it to as many people as possible.”

AT&T documents state law enforcement doesn’t need a search warrant to use Hemisphere, just an administrative subpoena, which does not require probable cause. The DEA was granted administrative subpoena power in 1970.

The Supreme Court ruled in 1979’s Smith v. Maryland that “non-content” metadata such as phone records were like an address written on an envelope, and phone customers had no reasonable expectation that it would be kept private.

AT&T stores details for every call, text message, Skype chat, or other communication that has passed through its infrastructure, retaining many records dating back to 1987, according to the Times 2013 Hemisphere report. The scope and length of the collection has accumulated trillions of records and is believed to be larger than any phone record database collected by the NSA under the Patriot Act, the Times reported.

The database allows its analysts to detect hidden patterns and connections between call detail records, and make highly accurate inferences about the associations and movements of the people Hemisphere is used to surveil. Its database is particularly useful for tracking a subscriber between multiple discarded phone numbers, as when drug dealers use successive prepaid “burner” phones to evade conventional surveillance.

Some Hemisphere operations have regionally appropriate nicknames: Atlanta’s is “Peach,” while Hawaii’s has been called “Sunshine.” West Allis, Wisconsin, city council minutes do not name the contract at all, referring to it only as “services needed for an investigative tool used by each of the HIDTA’s Investigative Support Centers from AT&T Government Solutions.” In 2014 Cameron County, Texas, Judge Carlos Casco ordered a line item in the commission minutes changed from “Hemisphere Project” to “database analysis services.” Casco is now the secretary of State of Texas.

The Florida attorney general’s Medicaid Fraud Unit received “Hemisphere Project” training in 2013, according to a report on the unit’s data-mining activities. Florida is one of eight states that is allowed to spend federal money on anti-fraud data mining initiatives. Florida Medicaid fraud investigators use such technology to look for suspicious connections between call detail records such as “a provider and a beneficiary with the same phone number or address.”

A group of shareholders represented by Arjuna Capital are concerned about the effect of negative press on stock value, and filed a proposal in December 2015 to require the company to issue a statement “clarifying the Company’s policies regarding providing information to law enforcement and intelligence agencies, domestically and internationally, above and beyond what is legally required by court order or other legally mandated process.”

AT&T contested the proposal and the matter is now before the Securities and Exchange Commission.


Edited by Zharkov, 25 October 2016 - 02:29 PM.

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#266 Zharkov

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Posted 25 October 2016 - 02:33 PM

Interesting outcome:

 

This series of posts will probably exist forever somewhere in the world.

 

The people hundreds of years from now, if there are any alive, can read about how a free country became a police state.

 

This is a warning to future generations.    Stop them while you can.   

 

Once they get started, this spying thing never ends.   

 

Remember, "Only You Can Prevent The Rise Of A Police State".


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#267 Zharkov

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Posted 25 October 2016 - 02:36 PM

And to the "shadow government", consider this topic to be a middle finger salute to your efforts to destroy liberty.


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#268 Zharkov

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Posted 25 October 2016 - 02:43 PM

All new NSA employees get to read Pravda forum.  

 

Some will because they are curious to what "the Russians" are saying.

 

Zharkov is not Russian.

 

Any American who has seen freedom disappear in a blizzard of legislation, minute by minute, every day, would be posting this stuff if I was not doing it.   

 

What the US government has been doing is wrong.   It is evil.   Millions are dead because of it.   And it has to stop.


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#269 shaktiman

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Posted 25 October 2016 - 02:47 PM

How about monitoring America's domestic enemy?
You know, the party that is against liberty and freedom of speech?

Democrat Party = Domestic Enemy

 

 

 

Some of us are doing and have done exactly that.

 

Good 'un!


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#270 shaktiman

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Posted 25 October 2016 - 02:51 PM

Why does the US government use labels for its laws that are the exact opposite of what the law actually does?

Patriot Act = Exact opposite, absolute treason against the 4th & 5th Amendments of the US Constitution.

US Freedom Act = Exact opposite, designed to end privacy in communications resulting in self-censoring and an end to freedom of speech.

Every new "law" is a dictate of the will of the elite and against the will of the people.    Nobody in America wants less freedom for themselves.

Trump should have said "MAKE AMERICANS FREE AGAIN".

 

 

 

 

Some of us Americans said this the day those laws were passed.

 

These are Anti-American and Anti-Russian and Anti-World anti-freedom!

 

Another Zharkov Zinger!

 

It is also very Shakting. 


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#271 shaktiman

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Posted 25 October 2016 - 02:56 PM

And to the "shadow government", consider this topic to be a middle finger salute to your efforts to destroy liberty.

 

 

 

I join you in that Zharkov!

 

So does Granny!

 

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#272 Zharkov

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Posted 25 October 2016 - 03:15 PM

Maybe NSA should ask Trump voters how they feel about Hillary's thugs spying on them.

 

From Page 1 of this topic, and worth repeating again:

 

"Together we can ... remind the government that if it really wants to know how we feel, asking is always cheaper than spying." -  Edward Snowden


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#273 Zharkov

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Posted 25 October 2016 - 03:30 PM

 

 

Some of us Americans said this the day those laws were passed.

 

These are Anti-American and Anti-Russian and Anti-World anti-freedom!

 

Another Zharkov Zinger!

 

It is also very Shakting. 

 

I first noticed this weird government thing back in the 1970's when I researched a new "Bank Secrecy Act" and was surprised to discover it was the exact opposite, giving government officials full access to private banking information of depositors.    A client had written a bad check but repaid the money and got prosecuted anyway.   I had to defend him and had to look at all laws related to banking and checking accounts, and found the title of the law was the exact opposite of what it actually did - it opened up all US bank customers to government snooping.   The client got probation after I pointed out this little detail to the judge, who quickly decided he did not want that discussed in open court.  

 

The coverup continues.    Most of the American public get their understanding of what a law does by its title.   So confusing them is easy, just make the title the opposite of what the law does.    A law that allows euthanasia of dogs might be called "Canine Protection Act", or some other benign-sounding title.   ObamaCare is another example:   "Affordable Health Care Act", except that it operates to make health care impossibly expensive!     When law becomes a bad joke, people stop laughing.


Edited by Zharkov, 25 October 2016 - 03:31 PM.

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#274 shaktiman

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Posted 25 October 2016 - 05:06 PM

I first noticed this weird government thing back in the 1970's when I researched a new "Bank Secrecy Act" and was surprised to discover it was the exact opposite, giving government officials full access to private banking information of depositors.

 

 

I am not an attorney. I learned law in the law library, in state and federal courts, and from many learned judges, attorneys and prosecutors that were honorable for the times.

 

In the thick of things I did study the voluminous laws and case law on banking that really use a myriad of applications from other bodies of law.

 

I once subpoenaed the Comptroller of The Currency and because I had an honest judge and did my homework, they showed up.

 

Moral of the story - these government offiicials for the most part are pretenders, and do not understand the laws as they claim in spite of law degrees even from renown institutions.

 

It appears that we have one or more of those honorable judges here in NC.

 

What a surprise.

 

I hope it continues.

 

Best regards.


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#275 Zharkov

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Posted 25 October 2016 - 07:57 PM

Law school teaches the history of law along with current law, because the laws we have today are an outgrowth of ancient laws of Germany and Britain, some even go back much farther in history such as before the Bible.   Knowing the history of law helps to understand how laws sometimes mean something other than one might expect from reading them.   

 

The Uniform Commercial Code (UCC) is one of those categories that some misunderstand to believe it means more than what it says.   UCC was intended to govern sales of goods and was an outgrowth of the Law Merchant.   UCC does not apply to sales of services, only goods.   Some patriots try to make it into other things but it is like a key that fits only one lock.   Law school makes a big difference in understanding how a judge would look at the UCC.    Many laws are like that, in that they were legislatively intended to cover only a narrow topic, and cannot be cited for other situations.

 

Conversely, people without that history information often come up with novel ideas and theories of law by thinking outside the "box" in which law schools place students.

 

So I consider it a healthy thing for people to read law on their own.   It brings fresh ideas and new methods of protecting liberty.


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#276 shaktiman

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Posted 25 October 2016 - 08:47 PM

So I consider it a healthy thing for people to read law on their own.   It brings fresh ideas and new methods of protecting liberty.

 

 

And its history even back to the first secular tribunals in Greece and Rome.

 

Funny you say fresh ideas and out of the box.

 

I had practice trying my own cases which most judges hate - the iconoclastic pro se litigant. 

 

I have nowhere near your experience but I saw a lot and in several states as well as in federal and appellate courts.

 

The cliche is that "anyone that represents themselves has a fool for a client". (Lincoln was fond of this it is said)

 

Granted that when one is trying to circumvent the law or escape a just resolution or conviction, this saying has some merit.

 

But, what about the poor soul that is truthful and honorable?

 

Is he or she a fool as well?

 

I have always wanted to ask the court, "Well judge, if a citizen that represents themselves in a court of law is a fool, who writes these laws that make a person a fool?"

 

 "Is the law written in such a complex way as to make only a single profession have the ability to comprehend such specialized jargon in court?  If so, some may call this tyranny. Or is it more just to have the laws written in such a way that the average Joe and Jane can understand not only its meaning but its rationale?"

 

I taught a general mathematics class a couple of years ago on the upper end for non-mathematics students at the college.

 

They did great because I feel I made it interesting.

 

In one of the courses I taught I decided to introduce the idea of accumulation and limit points - a rather sophisticated elementary pure math that goes over the head of most.

 

But I recall doing the same presentation to an Illinois judge and he got scared.

 

Here is the formal definition from Wikipedia that's a good one.

 

"In mathematics, specifically in real analysis, the Bolzano–Weierstrass theorem, named after Bernard Bolzano and Karl Weierstrass, is a fundamental result about convergence in a finite-dimensional Euclidean space Rn. The theorem states that each bounded sequence in Rn has a convergent subsequence.[1] An equivalent formulation is that a subset of Rn is sequentially compact if and only if it is closed and bounded.[2] The theorem is sometimes called the sequential compactness theorem.[3]"

 

It has applications in other fields but i thought what about circumstantial evidence and especially how this relates to the mandate of "beyond a reasonable doubt"?

 

You see these points accumulate and if the idea of up to a limit is introduced along with "sub sets or sub sequences" then this applies to the set of evidence introduced both direct and circumstantial and all the rest.

 

Now since a subset of this set of accumulating points will converge to a limit that leaves no room for doubt it can be now asserted and argued that for the body of evidence the proof is incontrovertible.

 

I gave a short idea behind it but I think you have the idea.

 

The judges in Chicago were not amused but my math students got it right away.

 

Go figure.

 

All the best.


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#277 Zharkov

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Posted 31 October 2016 - 04:51 AM

NSA contractor accused of spying stole real names of US undercover officers

Source: Intel News

Classified information stolen by a United States federal contractor, who was charged with espionage last month, includes the true identities of American intelligence officers posted in undercover assignments abroad, according to court documents.

 

In August of this year, Harold Thomas Martin III, was arrested by the Federal Bureau of Investigation on charges of stealing government property and illegally removing classified material. Martin, 51, served as a US Navy officer for over a decade, where he acquired a top secret clearance and specialized in cyber security. At the time of his arrest earlier this year, he was working for Booz Allen Hamilton, one of the largest federal contractors in the US. Some media reports said Martin was a member of the National Security Agency’s Office of Tailored Access Operations, described by observers as an elite “hacker army” tasked with conducting offensive cyber espionage against foreign targets.

Last week, after prosecutors alleged that the information Martin removed from the NSA was the equivalent of 500 million pages, a judge in the US state of Maryland ruled that the accused might flee if he is released on bail. Soon afterwards, Martin’s legal team filed a motion asking the judge to reconsider his decision to deny him bail. That prompted a new filing by the prosecution, which was delivered to the court on Thursday. The document alleges that the information found in Martin’s home and car includes “numerous names” of American intelligence officers who currently “operate under cover outside the US”. The court filing adds that Martin’s removal of the documents from secure government facilities constitutes “a security breach that risks exposure of American intelligence operations” and “could endanger the lives” of undercover intelligence officers and their agents abroad.

It is alleged that Martin told the FBI he never shared classified information with anyone, and that he removed it from his office at the NSA in order to deepen his expertise on his subject. His legal team argues that Martin suffers from a mental condition that compels him to be a hoarder. But prosecutors for the government argue in court documents that Martin appears to have communicated via the Internet with Russian speakers, and that he was learning Russian at the time of his arrest. The case is expected to be tried later this year.

http://www.blacklist.../38/38/Y/M.html

 

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

 

Is communication with Russian-speaking people against the law now?

So nobody is allowed to speak to Condaleeza Rice because she speaks Russian a little bit?

 

OK, 500 million pages of NSA stuff seems excessive, but what on earth is NSA doing by having the secret real names of CIA and other intel officers and agents abroad?    NSA isn't supposed to be spying on CIA people, are they?

 

Isn't spying on CIA agents the job of internal security at CIA?

 

NSA should have no connection whatever to top secret CIA people.

 

What is going on with this NSA regime?   Can't they keep a secret?


Edited by Zharkov, 31 October 2016 - 04:52 AM.

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#278 shaktiman

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Posted 31 October 2016 - 06:56 AM

Isn't spying on CIA agents the job of internal security at CIA?

 

 

Not solely.

 

The military and on occasion the FIB do it as well.

 

Sometimes wires get crossed.

 

What is going on with this NSA regime?

 

 

I am not an expert on that agency.

 

The scant info I get suggests they are not the sharpest tools in the shed.

 

Many intelligence agencies suffer from the same malady,

 

There are always the IQ off the chart guys too. They can be an interesting study.

 

Best regards. 


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#279 Zharkov

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Posted 31 October 2016 - 01:41 PM

NSA seems to be a national security risk these days, so is it wise to give them access to covert agents overseas?

 

If the bad guys get the real names of the agents, then they can find their families, their friends, their relatives, and mess up whatever security arrangements exist for them (probably none, of course).   

 

It is difficult to believe that NSA could have full access to the names of all intel agency employees working in other agencies.

 

Why?   Because all US secrets are kept on a "need to know" basis, and NSA had no need to know UNLESS they are spying on our spies.

 

NSA =  Notorious Screwups of America


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#280 shaktiman

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Posted 31 October 2016 - 03:28 PM

If the bad guys get the real names of the agents, then they can find their families, their friends, their relatives, and mess up whatever security arrangements exist for them (probably none, of course).

 

 

There are exceptions as usual.

 

Look at FIB special agent "handsome" Bob Hansen. We need to thank Russia on that one.

 

I went to HS with the Hansens. I wasn't surprised nor did Russia really need his BS. I know the US didn't either.

 

So, in that case, the FIB, as it happens a bit too much, was the bad guy group.

 

As for NSA, that to me, is a more modern outfit, thus the tendency to "screw up " is much higher.

 

This is what I learned well in my travails.

 

It is easier, more efficient, with almost always better outcomes, and always less violence when we don't scam but are truthful.

 

Zharkov, you are highly intelligent thus you know the power of truth.

 

You and I both use it.

 

All the best!


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