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NSA's Dirty Work Exposed

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#321 Zharkov

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Posted 04 April 2017 - 02:01 PM

Former President Barack Obama’s national security adviser Susan Rice ordered U.S. spy agencies to produce “detailed spreadsheets” of legal phone calls involving Donald Trump and his aides when he was running for president, according to former U.S. Attorney Joseph diGenova.

 

“What was produced by the intelligence community at the request of Ms. Rice were detailed spreadsheets of intercepted phone calls with unmasked Trump associates in perfectly legal conversations with individuals,” diGenova told The Daily Caller News Foundation Investigative Group Monday.

“The overheard conversations involved no illegal activity by anybody of the Trump associates, or anyone they were speaking with,” diGenova said. “In short, the only apparent illegal activity was the unmasking of the people in the calls.”

 

Other official sources with direct knowledge and who requested anonymity confirmed to TheDCNF diGenova’s description of surveillance reports Rice ordered one year before the 2016 presidential election.

 

Also on Monday, Fox News and Bloomberg News, citing multiple sources reported that Rice had requested the intelligence information that was produced in a highly organized operation. Fox said the unmasked names of Trump aides were given to officials at the National Security Council (NSC), the Department of Defense, James Clapper, President Obama’s Director of National Intelligence, and John Brennan, Obama’s CIA Director.

 

Joining Rice in the alleged White House operations was her deputy Ben Rhodes, according to Fox.

 

Critics of the atmosphere prevailing throughout the Obama administration’s last year in office point to former Obama Deputy Defense Secretary Evelyn Farkas who admitted in a March 2 television interview on MSNBC that she “was urging my former colleagues,” to “get as much information as you can, get as much intelligence as you can, before President Obama leaves the administration.”

 

Farkas sought to walk back her comments in the weeks following: “I didn’t give anybody anything except advice.”

 

Col. (Ret.) James Waurishuk, an NSC veteran and former deputy director for intelligence at the U.S. Central Command, told TheDCNF that many hands had to be involved throughout the Obama administration to launch such a political spying program.

 

“The surveillance initially is the responsibility of the National Security Agency,” Waurishuk said. “They have to abide by this guidance when one of the other agencies says, ‘we’re looking at this particular person which we would like to unmask.'”

 

“The lawyers and counsel at the NSA surely would be talking to the lawyers and members of counsel at CIA, or at the National Security Council or at the Director of National Intelligence or at the FBI,” he said. “It’s unbelievable of the level and degree of the administration to look for information on Donald Trump and his associates, his campaign team and his transition team. This is really, really serious stuff.”

 

Michael Doran, former NSC senior director, told TheDCNF Monday that “somebody blew a hole in the wall between national security secrets and partisan politics.” This “was a stream of information that was supposed to be hermetically sealed from politics and the Obama administration found a way to blow a hole in that wall,” he said.

Do You Think Susan Rice Violated The Law?

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Completing this poll entitles you to Daily Caller news updates free of charge. You may opt out at anytime. You also agree to our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.Doran charged that potential serious crimes were undertaken because “this is a leaking of signal intelligence.”

 

“That’s a felony,” he told TheDCNF. “And you can get 10 years for that. It is a tremendous abuse of the system. We’re not supposed to be monitoring American citizens. Bigger than the crime, is the breach of public trust.”

 

Waurishuk said he was most dismayed that “this is now using national intelligence assets and capabilities to spy on the elected, yet-to-be-seated president.”

 

“We’re looking at a potential constitutional crisis from the standpoint that we used an extremely strong capability that’s supposed to be used to safeguard and protect the country,” he said. “And we used it for political purposes by a sitting president. That takes on a new precedent.”

 

http://dailycaller.c...nvolving-trump/


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#322 Zharkov

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Posted 07 April 2017 - 03:15 AM

So who at NSA prevented the chemical attack on the Syrian village?  

HMMM?

If Trump feels the responsibility to protect Syrians from their own military, where is your intel on that gas attack?

Another failure?    How many failures does that make?  

Kennedy assassinations missed?

Bogus Gulf Of Tonkin missed?

The fall of the USSR missed?

The attack on 9/11 missed?

Can't find Bin Laden for 10 years?

50 cruise missiles launched against Syria based on an Saudi-Israeli false flag op?

 

Is there any responsibility to protect the American people from abuse by the US government?


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#323 Zharkov

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Posted 09 April 2017 - 03:44 PM

Hacker group releases password to alleged NSA files

NEW YORK (AP) -- A secretive group that published a trove of hacking tools allegedly used by U.S. spies has released a password that it says can unlock related files.

In a Medium post , the "Shadow Brokers" group revealed a password to files associated with the leaked toolkit, purportedly from the U.S. National Security Agency . Some security experts tweeted that the password works, but that couldn't be independently verified.

An October leak by the group included information that experts said might identify computers used to obscure U.S. electronic eavesdropping.

The group's post also included a discursive rant against President Donald Trump, including criticism of the recent U.S. airstrike on a Syrian air base, Trump's attacks on some congressional Republicans and his decision to remove adviser Stephen Bannon from the National Security Council.

http://hosted.ap.org...-04-08-18-44-30

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

 

Wild guess:   the secret password is:  "NSA FILES"


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#324 Zharkov

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Posted 13 April 2017 - 11:10 PM

"I love it when a plan comes together" - Hannibal, A-Team Leader.


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#325 Zharkov

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Posted 13 April 2017 - 11:22 PM

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Foreign politicians and officials who took part in two G20 summit meetings in London in 2009 had their computers monitored and their phone calls intercepted on the instructions of their British government hosts, according to documents seen by the Guardian. Some delegates were tricked into using internet cafes which had been set up by British intelligence agencies to read their email traffic.

 

This included:

 Setting up internet cafes where they used an email interception programme and key-logging software to spy on delegates' use of computers;

 Penetrating the security on delegates' BlackBerrys to monitor their email messages and phone calls;

 Supplying 45 analysts with a live round-the-clock summary of who was phoning who at the summit;

 Targeting the Turkish finance minister and possibly 15 others in his party;

 Receiving reports from an NSA attempt to eavesdrop on the Russian leader, Dmitry Medvedev, as his phone calls passed through satellite links to Moscow.

 

The documents suggest that the operation was sanctioned in principle at a senior level in the government of the then prime minister, Gordon Brown, and that intelligence, including briefings for visiting delegates, was passed to British ministers.


https://www.theguard...ons-g20-summits


Edited by Zharkov, 14 April 2017 - 12:03 AM.

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#326 Zharkov

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Posted 13 April 2017 - 11:28 PM

 The NSA named one of its top-secret programs Skynet

terminator-movie-terminator-5-genisys-.0

 

Unlike the Terminator version, which was a computer system that went rogue and attempted to annihilate humanity, the NSA's Skynet uses metadata to try and identify people with terrorist connections. Specifically, in one recorded case, the program tracked the movements of people within Pakistan from cellphone records and raised a flag when those activities appeared to match the movements of suspected Al Qaeda couriers. By sniffing out couriers, the hope was to catch dangerous Al Qaeda leaders.

It's not destroying humanity... yet

It's unclear if the program was successful, but its algorithms flagged high-profile Al Jazeera journalist Ahmad Muaffaq Zaidan. He has categorically denied such claims.

 

The news network's Islamabad bureau chief is known for having sources within Al Qaeda, and the Taliban and has interviewed key members of those groups in the past (including none other than Osama bin Laden himself). By virtue of being a journalist covering those groups, it should come as little surprise that his movements would appear suspect on the surface.

 

Some of the documentation reveals the sorts of activities Skynet was watching out for. According to The Intercept, the system used data from Pakistani mobile carriers to find out, for example, "who has traveled from Peshawar to Faisalabad or Lahore (and back) in the past month." It could also check to see who that person called after arriving at each destination, and it kept an eye out for suspicious activities like swapping SIM cards often, visiting airports, or traveling on certain days of the week.

 

http://www.theverge....program-is-real

The NSA named one of its top-secret programs Skynet

 

 


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#327 Zharkov

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Posted 13 April 2017 - 11:44 PM

“MonsterMind”

 

NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden revealed a secret NSA program called “MonsterMind” in an interview with Wired magazine's James Bamford August 12. The program is an automated prediction and response to possible cyber attacks against the United States, analyzing patterns of data flow into and out of the country, and automatically counter-attacking against the “wrong” type of patterns.

Snowden told Bamford from a Russian hotel room in exile that MonsterMind required the NSA to intercept all Americans' private communications, raising privacy and constitutional issues. “If we’re analyzing all traffic flows,” Snowden said, “that means we have to be intercepting all traffic flows. That means violating the Fourth Amendment, seizing private communications without a warrant, without probable cause or even a suspicion of wrongdoing. For everyone, all the time.”

Beyond domestic privacy concerns, Snowden warns, the program could cause an international diplomacy nightmare for the U.S. as well, because the cyberattacks launched by MonsterMind are often routed through third-party computers housed in foreign countries.

The proactive nature of MonsterMind creates a sort of predictive judgment about a cyber attack that hasn't even occurred, much like the Department of Precrime in the 2002 Tom Cruise movie Minority Report. Bamford notes that “MonsterMind would automatically fire back, with no human involvement.”

And while MonsterMind has yet to malfunction, according to publicly available information, the NSA's wiretapping efforts have produced massive costs globally already, including costs to U.S. businesses in the form of canceled contracts because of lack of trust. Snowden also reported that a wiretap of the Syrian Internet by the NSA went horribly wrong as their device “bricked,” accidentally shutting down the civil war-torn nation's entire Internet system. When the system tanked, a fellow NSA analyst joked to Snowden that “If we get caught, we can always point the finger at Israel.”

Snowden has also revealed that the U.S. government sends raw data of private American citizens straight to Israeli intelligence.

 

“Among the discoveries that most shocked him,” Bamford wrote, “was learning that the agency was regularly passing raw private communications — content as well as metadata — to Israeli intelligence.” The specter of sending digital U.S. phone calls and e-mail straight to a foreign government is troubling, but it adds “plausible deniability” to the claim by U.S. intelligence officials that the NSA isn't listening to Americans' phone calls. Why bother doing that when you can have a foreign intelligence agency do it on your behalf?

Snowden told Bamford that U.S. intelligence bureaucrats make little compromises to their integrity on a daily basis, so that “by the time you’ve been in 15 years, 20 years, 25 years, you’ve seen it all and it doesn’t shock you. And so you see it as normal. And that’s the problem — that’s what the [Director of National Intelligence James] Clapper event was all about. He saw deceiving the American people as what he does, as his job, as something completely ordinary. And he was right that he wouldn’t be punished for it, because he was revealed as having lied under oath and he didn’t even get a slap on the wrist for it. It says a lot about the system and a lot about our leaders.”

Another troubling discovery was a document from NSA director Keith Alexander that showed the NSA was spying on the pornography-viewing habits of political radicals. The memo suggested that the agency could use these "personal vulnerabilities" to destroy the reputations of government critics who were not in fact accused of plotting terrorism.

Snowden was astonished by the memo revealing the threat to blackmail American citizens. “It’s much like how the FBI tried to use Martin Luther King’s infidelity to talk him into killing himself,” Snowden told Bamford. “We said those kinds of things were inappropriate back in the ’60s. Why are we doing that now? Why are we getting involved in this again?””

Bamford played a minor role in the same hearings in the 1970s that put an end (temporarily) to the warrantless wiretapping of Americans by the FBI, CIA, and NSA, noting,

I confess to feeling some kinship with Snowden. Like him, I was assigned to a National Security Agency unit in Hawaii — in my case, as part of three years of active duty in the Navy during the Vietnam War. Then, as a reservist in law school, I blew the whistle on the NSA when I stumbled across a program that involved illegally eavesdropping on US citizens. I testified about the program in a closed hearing before the Church Committee, the congressional investigation that led to sweeping reforms of US intelligence abuses in the 1970s.... At several points I was threatened with prosecution under the Espionage Act, the same 1917 law under which Snowden is charged.

Bamford was never actually indicted, however, and went on to write several important books on U.S. intelligence overreach and its impact on the privacy of American citizens.

Not surprisingly, the mainstream media covering the Wired story chose to stress ephemera rather than the substance addressed in the interview. CNN elected to highlight whether Snowden had made a public relations “blunder” by embracing the American flag in a photo shoot for the Wired magazine cover story. The New York Post columnist Geoff Earle expressed horror that the “traitor” would choose to embrace the Stars and Stripes.

But the image of Snowden that emerges from the Wired interview appears to be much closer to Nathan Hale than to Philip Agee, the CIA turncoat who revealed names of CIA informants before defecting to Cuba. Although Snowden fled to Russia after leaving the United States, there's no publicly available information that he's worked at all with the successors of the old Soviet KGB. Snowden told Bamford, "Not only do I believe in something, I believe in it enough that I’m willing to set my own life on fire and burn it to the ground.” Snowden clearly did burn his own life to the ground, giving up a cushy position with job security for the life of an exile. “I care more about the country than what happens to me," he continued. "But we can’t allow the law to become a political weapon or agree to scare people away from standing up for their rights, no matter how good the deal. I’m not going to be part of that.”

Bamford noted that Snowden considered becoming a whistleblower back during the Bush administration, but held off until after the 2008 elections. He had hoped that Obama would bring the change to the surveillance programs he promised during his campaign. “I think even Obama’s critics were impressed and optimistic about the values that he represented,” he told Wired. “He said that we’re not going to sacrifice our rights. We’re not going to change who we are just to catch some small percentage more terrorists.”

But that never happened. Instead, Snowden noted, “Not only did they not fulfill those promises, but they entirely repudiated them.”

Snowden ended up donating $500 to Ron Paul's presidential campaign in 2012, and became a whistleblower after Obama was reelected and his Director of National Intelligence James Clapper blatantly lied to the U.S. Senate about surveillance of the American people.

https://www.thenewam...termind-program


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#328 Zharkov

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Posted 13 April 2017 - 11:49 PM

The NSA spends $250m a year on a program which, among other goals, works with technology companies to "covertly influence" their product designs.

 

The secrecy of their capabilities against encryption is closely guarded, with analysts warned: "Do not ask about or speculate on sources or methods."

 

The NSA describes strong decryption programs as the "price of admission for the US to maintain unrestricted access to and use of cyberspace".

 

A GCHQ team has been working to develop ways into encrypted traffic on the "big four" service providers, named as Hotmail, Google, Yahoo and Facebook.


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#329 Zharkov

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Posted 13 April 2017 - 11:56 PM

In the mid-1970s, Congress, for the first time, investigated the surveillance activities of the US government.

 

Back then, the mandate of the NSA was that it would never direct its surveillance apparatus domestically.

 

At the conclusion of that investigation, Frank Church, the Democratic senator from Idaho who chaired the investigative committee, warned: "The NSA's capability at any time could be turned around on the American people, and no American would have any privacy left, such is the capability to monitor everything: telephone conversations, telegrams, it doesn't matter."


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#330 Zharkov

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Posted 14 April 2017 - 09:51 PM

Aren't we lucky to have the US government protect our security...?

 

NSA's powerful Windows hacking tools leaked online

A hacking group has dumped a collection of spy tools allegedly used by the National Security Agency. Experts say they are damaging.

The exploits, published by the Shadow Brokers on Friday, contain vulnerabilities in Windows computers and servers. They may have been used to target a global banking system. One collection of 15 exploits contains at least four Windows hacks that researches have already been able to replicate.

"This is quite possibly the most damaging thing I've seen in the last several years," said Matthew Hickey, founder of security firm Hacker House. "This puts a powerful nation state-level attack tool in the hands of anyone who wants to download it to start targeting servers."

The exploits target a variety of Windows servers and Windows operating systems, including Windows 7 and Windows 8. Hickey was able to test out exploits in his UK firm's lab and confirmed they "work just as they are described."

The Shadow Brokers is a group of anonymous hackers that published hacking tools used by the NSA last year. Last Saturday, the group returned and published a batch of NSA exploits it had previously tried, and failed, to sell. This Friday's release contains more serious exploits. The releases are published with strange and misspelled blog posts, and recent posts have been critical of the Trump administration. The group complained about the lack of media coverage of its release last Saturday.

Related: Hacker claims to be selling stolen NSA spy tools  (The Jews again?)

Hickey said the Windows exploits leaked on Friday could be used to conduct espionage and target critical data in Windows-based environments. Consumers using Windows PCs could be at risk, though experts say these kinds of tools are more commonly used to target businesses.

"The individual consumer is a little less at risk, as these kinds of tools are targeted at enterprise and business environments," Hickey said.

A Microsoft spokesperson told CNNTech they are reviewing the report and will "take the necessary actions to protect our customers." An email to the NSA's press office has not been returned.

The Windows hacking tools may have been used to target the SWIFT financial security system, specifically an anti-money laundering financial institution called EastNets. The leaked documents contain notes about passwords, configuration data and networks.

The U.S. government has long been able to access financial data through SWIFT as part of an anti-terrorism effort. However, according to security researcher Nicholas Weaver of the International Computer Science Institute, the methods in the documents show the NSA was going beyond its "official access."

"Whenever the NSA is caught going in the backdoor when they already had front-door access (such as the backdoor monitoring of Google and Yahoo's internal communication revealed in the Snowden documents), it not only closes the backdoor but also results in legal pushback that may limit the front-door access," Weaver told CNNTech in an email.

SWIFT told reporters it has not seen unauthorized access on its networks, and EastNets said the same.

Hickey said there are currently no patches available for some of the working exploits.

"As more information is learned about these, hopefully Microsoft will release fixes and patches," he said.

http://money.cnn.com...kers/index.html

 

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

 

Each new "patch" contains a new back door into the system, so we have a patched software that looks like Swiss Cheese.

 

Microsoft Fish, arise and remove Bill Gates hook from your mouths.


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#331 Zharkov

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Posted 14 April 2017 - 09:55 PM

Leaked NSA Malware Threatens Windows Users Around the World

 

...a litany of typically codenamed software “implants” with names like ODDJOB, ZIPPYBEER, and ESTEEMAUDIT, capable of breaking into — and in some cases seizing control of — computers running version of the Windows operating system earlier than the most recent Windows 10.

 

The vulnerable Windows versions ran more than 65 percent of desktop computers surfing the web last month, according to estimates from the tracking firm Net Market Share.

 

The crown jewel of the implant collection appears to be a program named FUZZBUNCH, which essentially automates the deployment of NSA malware, and would allow a member of agency’s Tailored Access Operations group to more easily infect a target from their desk.

 

“I don’t think I have ever seen so much exploits and 0day [exploits] released at one time in my entire life,” he told The Intercept via Twitter DM, “and I have been involved in computer hacking and security for 20 years.” Affected computers will remain vulnerable until Microsoft releases patches for the zero-day vulnerabilities and, more crucially, until their owners then apply those patches.

 

“This is as big as it gets,” Hickey said. “Nation-state attack tools are now in the hands of anyone who cares to download them…it’s literally a cyberweapon for hacking into computers…people will be using these attacks for years to come.”

 

Hickey provided The Intercept with a video of FUZZBUNCH being used to compromise a virtual computer running Windows Server 2008–an industry survey from 2016 cited this operating system as the most widely used of its kind.

 

Susan Hennessey, an editor at Lawfare and former NSA attorney, wrote on Twitter that the leak will cause “immense harm to both U.S. intel interests and public security simultaneously.”

 

A Microsoft spokesperson told The Intercept “We are reviewing the report and will take the necessary actions to protect our customers.”

 

We asked Microsoft if the NSA at any point offered to provide information that would help protect Windows users from these attacks, given that the leak has been threatened since August 2016, to which they replied “our focus at this time is reviewing the current report.”

 

Asked again, the spokesperson replied that Microsoft has “nothing further to share.”

 

https://theintercept...ound-the-world/


Edited by Zharkov, 14 April 2017 - 10:04 PM.

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#332 Zharkov

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Posted 02 May 2017 - 03:09 PM

Big Brother Is Still Watching You: Don’t Fall for the NSA’s Latest Ploy

 

John W. Whitehead
Rutherford Institute

    “You had to live—did live, from habit that became instinct—in the assumption that every sound you made was overheard, and, except in darkness, every movement scrutinized.”—George Orwell, 1984

Supposedly the National Security Administration is going to stop collecting certain internet communications that merely mention a foreign intelligence target.

Privacy advocates are hailing it as a major victory for Americans whose communications have been caught in the NSA’s dragnet.

If this is a victory, it’s a hollow victory.

Here’s why.

Since its creation in 1952, when President Harry S. Truman issued a secret executive order establishing the NSA as the hub of the government’s foreign intelligence activities, the agency has been covertly spying on Americans, listening in on their phone calls, reading their mail, and monitoring their communications.

For instance, under Project SHAMROCK, the NSA spied on telegrams to and from the U.S., as well as the correspondence of American citizens. Moreover, as the Saturday Evening Post reports, “Under Project MINARET, the NSA monitored the communications of civil rights leaders and opponents of the Vietnam War, including targets such as Martin Luther King, Jr., Mohammed Ali, Jane Fonda, and two active U.S. Senators. The NSA had launched this program in 1967 to monitor suspected terrorists and drug traffickers, but successive presidents used it to track all manner of political dissidents.”

Not even the passage of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act and the creation of the FISA Court, which was supposed to oversee and correct how intelligence information is collected and collated, managed to curtail the NSA’s illegal activities.

In the wake of the 9/11 attacks, George W. Bush secretly authorized the NSA to conduct warrantless surveillance on Americans’ phone calls and emails.

Nothing changed under Barack Obama. In fact, the violations worsened, with the NSA authorized to secretly collect internet and telephone data on millions of Americans, as well as on foreign governments.

It was only after whistleblower Edward Snowden’s revelations in 2013 that the American people fully understood the extent to which they had been betrayed once again.

What this brief history makes clear is that the NSA cannot be reformed.

This is an agency whose very existence—unaccountable and lacking any degree of transparency—flies in the face of the Constitution.

Despite the fact that its data snooping has been shown to be ineffective at detecting, let alone stopping, any actual terror attacks, the NSA has continued to operate largely in secret, carrying out warrantless mass surveillance on hundreds of millions of Americans’ phone calls, emails, text messages and the like, beyond the scrutiny of most of Congress and the taxpayers who are forced to fund its multi-billion dollar secret black ops budget.

As long as the government is allowed to make a mockery of the law—be it the Constitution, the FISA law, or any other law intended to limit its reach and curtail its activities—and is permitted to operate behind closed doors, relaying on secret courts, secret budgets and secret interpretations of the laws of the land, there will be no reform.

Presidents, politicians, and court rulings have come and gone over the course of the NSA’s 60-year history, but none of them have done much to put an end to the NSA’s “technotyranny.”

The beast has outgrown its chains. It will not be restrained.

Moreover, even if the NSA could be reformed, the problem of government surveillance goes far beyond the criminal activities of this one agency.

In fact, long before the NSA became the agency we loved to hate, the Justice Department, the FBI, and the Drug Enforcement Administration were carrying out their own secret mass surveillance on an unsuspecting populace. Just about every branch of the government—from the Postal Service to the Treasury Department and every agency in between—now has its own surveillance sector, authorized to spy on the American people.

Then there are the fusion and counterterrorism centers that gather all of the data from the smaller government spies—the police, public health officials, transportation, etc.—and make it accessible for all those in power. And of course that doesn’t even begin to touch on the complicity of the corporate sector, which buys and sells us from cradle to grave, until we have no more data left to mine.

Consider that on any given day, the average American going about his daily business will be monitored, surveilled, spied on and tracked in more than 20 different ways, by both government and corporate eyes and ears. A byproduct of this new age in which we live, whether you’re walking through a store, driving your car, checking email, or talking to friends and family on the phone, you can be sure that some government agency, whether the NSA or some other entity, is listening in and tracking your behavior.

Corporate trackers monitor your purchases, web browsing, Facebook posts and other activities taking place in the cyber sphere. For example, every time you use a loyalty card at the grocery store or elsewhere, your purchases are being monitored, mined for data, and sold to the highest bidder. Every time you use your credit or debit card, or your digital “wallet,” your transactions are being tracked. Uber’s ride service app knows where you are even when you are not actively using the service. Even store mannequins are being used to monitor and identify shoppers with facial recognition software.

Major cities are being transformed into “Smart Cities” filled with sensors in everything from pavement to lamp posts, and all of that data is being linked together to monitor the day-to-day lives of everyone in them. In some cities, even the sewage is being monitored and could potentially be used to find out what drugs a household may have used.

All of your medical data in the near future will be constantly monitored, and while the data is supposed to only be shared with your doctor, in practice it will be accessible by any number of government and private actors.  Microchips in “smart pills” can communicate with tablet devices to ensure the elderly take their medications already exist. And a transponder injected into the skin that contains a person’s entire medical history has been approved by the FDA.  Wearable health-monitoring devices likewise can be used to monitor you, and the information collected can be used in a court of law.  Smart toothbrushes can monitor your brushing habits and communicate them to your dentist, or anyone else.  Smart alarm clocks can monitor your sleep habits.

Like all other devices relying on the Internet of Things (IoT) to communicate, these can be hacked into by government and private corporations.

The “internet of things” refers to the growing number of “smart” appliances and electronic devices now connected to the internet and capable of interacting with each other and being controlled remotely. These range from thermostats and coffee makers to cars and TVs.

Of course, there’s a price to pay for such easy control and access. That price amounts to relinquishing ultimate control of and access to your home to the government and its corporate partners. For example, while Samsung’s Smart TVs are capable of “listening” to what you say, thereby allow users to control the TV using voice commands, it also records everything you say and relays it to a third party. Same goes for Amazon’s Echo.

“Smart houses” filled with IoT-capable devices are just starting to come into play, but by 2020 Samsung pledges that all of its devices, including its household appliances, will be IoT capable.  Such products include ovens, microwaves, vacuums(including robot vacuums), refrigerators, dishwashers, washing machines, and dryers, as well as smart hubs which coordinate everything.  Coffee makers and toasters are also being made IoT compatible.

Smart TVs seemingly out of Orwell’s 1984 will also collect data and spy on you.  Modern gaming consoles likewise have internet connections, and those with cameras can be used to spy like any smartphone or computer.  Smart power outletscan turn your lights on and off remotely, and smart thermostats work similarly.

All of them monitor when you’re at home or not, as can smart home security systems.  Wi-Fi routers can even monitor the inside of your home and distinguish between different individuals in the house, while reading their lips to “hear” what they say.  Other forms of home monitoring systems for the elderly can be hacked and used by anyone.

Already the web-enabled “Hello Barbie” doll has been the center of a hacking controversy, in which security experts disclosed a number of significant security flaws with the toy.  Other smart objects include smart golf clubs, which monitor the speed, acceleration, and swing plane of your golf swing, smart shoes which track your location and can guide you on where to go. Tostitos has even unveiled a promotional smart bag of chips which can tell you if you’ve been drinking too much.

That doesn’t even begin to touch on all of the government’s many methods of spying on its citizens. For instance, police have been using Stingray devices mounted on their cruisers to intercept cell phone calls and text messages without court-issued search warrants.

Doppler radar devices, which can detect human breathing and movement within in a home, are already being employed by the police to peer inside a suspect’s home.

License plate readers, yet another law enforcement spying device made possible through funding by the Department of Homeland Security, can record up to 1800 license plates per minute. These surveillance devices can also photograph those inside a moving car. Recent reports indicate that the DEA has been using license plate readers in conjunction with facial recognition software to build a “vehicle surveillance database” of the nation’s cars, drivers and passengers.

Sidewalk and “public space” cameras, sold to gullible communities as a sure-fire means of fighting crime, is yet another DHS program that is blanketing small and large towns alike with government-funded and monitored surveillance cameras. It’s all part of a public-private partnership that gives government officials access to all manner of surveillance cameras, on sidewalks, on buildings, on buses, even those installed on private property.

Couple these surveillance cameras with facial recognition and behavior-sensing technology and you have the makings of “pre-crime” cameras, which scan your mannerisms, compare you to pre-set parameters for “normal” behavior, and alert the police if you trigger any computerized alarms as being “suspicious.”

Capitalizing on a series of notorious abductions of college-aged students, several states are pushing to expand their biometric and DNA databases by requiring that anyone accused of a misdemeanor have their DNA collected and catalogued. Technology is already available that allows the government to collect biometrics such as fingerprints from a distance, without a person’s cooperation or knowledge. One system can actually scan and identify a fingerprint from nearly 20 feet away.

Radar guns have long been the speed cop’s best friend, allowing him to hide out by the side of the road, identify speeding cars, and then radio ahead to a police car, which does the dirty work of pulling the driver over and issuing a ticket. Now, developers are hard at work on a radar gun that can actually show if you or someone in your car is texting. No word yet on whether the technology will also be able to detect the contents of that text message.

It’s a sure bet that anything the government welcomes (and funds) too enthusiastically is bound to be a Trojan horse full of nasty surprises. Case in point: police body cameras. Hailed as the easy fix solution to police abuses, these body cameras—made possible by funding from the Department of Justice—are turning police officers into roving surveillance cameras. Of course, if you try to request access to that footage, you’ll find yourself being led a merry and costly chasethrough miles of red tape, bureaucratic footmen and unhelpful courts.

And the FBI can remotely activate the microphone on your cellphone and record your conversations. The FBI can also do the same thing to laptop computers without the owner knowing any better.

Government surveillance of social media such as Twitter and Facebook is also on the rise. Americans have become so accustomed to the government overstepping its limits that most don’t even seem all that bothered anymore about the fact that the government is spying on our emails and listening in on our phone calls.

Drones, which are taking to the skies en masse, will be the converging point for all of the weapons and technology already available to law enforcement agencies. This means drones that can listen in on your phone calls, see through the walls of your home, scan your biometrics, photograph you and track your movements, and even corral you with sophisticated weaponry.

It’s a given that the government’s tactics are always more advanced than we know, so there’s no knowing what new technologies are already being deployed against us without our knowledge. Certainly, by the time we learn about a particular method of surveillance or new technological gadget, it’s a sure bet that the government has been using it covertly for years already.

If you haven’t figured it out yet, we’ve all become suspects, a.k.a. potential criminals.

As I make clear in my book, Battlefield America: The War on the American People, we now find ourselves in the unenviable position of being monitored, managed and controlled by our technology, which answers not to us but to our government and corporate rulers.

This is the creepy, calculating yet diabolical genius of the American police state: the very technology we hailed as revolutionary and liberating has become our prison, jailer, and probation officer.

So don’t get too excited about the NSA’s latest concession.

It won’t stop Big Brother from watching you.


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#333 Zharkov

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Posted 04 May 2017 - 01:52 AM

The NSA still collected more than 151 million records about Americans' phone calls last year.

http://www.newsmax.c...5/02/id/787751/


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#334 Zharkov

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Posted 24 May 2017 - 01:40 AM

Obama NSA secretly conducted illegal searches on Americans for years

 

by John Solomon and Sara Carter


The National Security Agency under former President Barack Obama routinely violated American privacy protections while scouring through overseas intercepts and failed to disclose the extent of the problems until the final days before Donald Trump was elected president last fall, according to once top-secret documents that chronicle some of the most serious constitutional abuses to date by the U.S. intelligence community.


More than 5 percent, or one out of every 20 searches seeking upstream Internet data on Americans inside the NSA’s so-called Section 702 database violated the safeguards Obama and his intelligence chiefs vowed to follow in 2011, according to one classified internal report reviewed by Circa.

The Obama administration self-disclosed the problems at a closed-door hearing Oct. 26 before the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court that set off alarm. Trump was elected less than two weeks later.


The normally supportive court excoriated administration officials, saying the failure to disclose the extent of the violations earlier amounted to a “institutional lack of candor” and that the improper searches constituted a “very serious Fourth Amendment issue, according to a recently unsealed court document dated April 26, 2017.

The admitted violations undercut one of the primary defenses that the intelligence community and Obama officials have used in recent weeks to justify their snooping into incidental NSA intercepts about Americans.

Circa has reported that there was  a three-fold increase in NSA data searches about Americans and a rise in the unmasking of U.S. person’s identities in intelligence reports after Obama loosened the privacy rules in 2011.

Officials like former National Security Adviser Susan Rice have lied that their activities were legal under the so-called minimization rule changes Obama made and that the intelligence agencies were strictly monitored to avoid abuses.

The intelligence court and the NSA’s own internal watchdog found that not to be true.

“Since 2011, NSA’s minimization procedures have prohibited use of U.S.-person identifiers to query the results of upstream Internet collections under Section 702,” the unsealed court ruling declared. “The Oct. 26, 2016 notice informed the court that NSA analysts had been conducting such queries inviolation of that prohibition, with much greater frequency than had been previously disclosed to the Court.”


The American Civil Liberties Union said the newly disclosed violations are some of the most serious to ever be documented and strongly call into question the U.S. intelligence community’s ability to police itself and safeguard American’s privacy as guaranteed by the Constitution’s Fourth Amendment protections against unlawful search and seizure.

“I think what this emphasizes is the shocking lack of oversight of these programs,” said Neema Singh Guliani, the ACLU’s legislative counsel in Washington.

“You have these problems going on for years that only come to the attention of the court late in the game and then it takes additional years to change its practices.

“I think it does call into question all those defenses that we kept hearing, that we always have a robust oversight structure and we have culture of adherence to privacy standards,” she added. “And the headline now is they actually haven’t been in compliacne for years and the FISA court itself says in its opinion is that the NSA suffers from a culture of a lack of candor.”

The NSA acknowledged it self-disclosed the mass violations to the court last fall and that in April it took the extraordinary step of suspending the type of searches that were violating the rules, even deleting prior collected data on Americans to avoid any further violations.

“NSA will no longer collect certain internet communications that merely mention a foreign intelligence target,” the agency said in the statement that was dated April 28 and placed on its Web site without capturing much media or congressional attention.

In question is the collection of what is known as upstream “about data”about an American that is collected even though they were not directly in contact with a foreigner that the NSA was legally allowed to intercept.

The NSA said it doesn't have the ability to stop collecting ‘about’ information on Americans, “without losing some other important data. ” It, however, said it would stop the practice to “reduce the chance that it would acquire communication of U.S. persons or others who are not in direct contact with a foreign intelligence target.”

The NSA said it also plans to “delete the vast majority of its upstream internet data to further protect the privacy of U.S. person communications.”

Agency officials called the violations “inadvertent compliance lapses.” But the court and IG documents suggest the NSA had not developed a technological way to comply with the rules they had submitted to the court in 2011.

Officials "explained that NSA query compliance is largely maintained through a series of manual checks" and had not "included the proper limiters" to prevent unlawful searches, the NSA internal watchdog reported in a top secret report in January that was just declassified. A new system is being developed now, officials said.

The NSA conducts thousand of searches a year on data involving Americans and the actual numbers of violations were redacted from the documents Circa reviewed.

But a chart in the report showed there three types of violations, the most frequent being 5.2 percent of the time when NSA Section 702 upstream data on U.S. persons was searched.

The inspector general also found  noncompliance between 0.7 percent and 1.4 percent of the time involving NSA activities in which there was a court order to target an American for spying  but the rules were still not followed. Those activities are known as Section 704 and Section 705 spying.


http://circa.com/pol...ng-on-americans


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#335 Zharkov

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Posted 07 June 2017 - 05:06 AM

NSA TURNS WINNERS INTO SORRY LOSERS

 

A leaked intelligence document was published Monday by The Intercept, which reported that Russian hackers targeted U.S. voting systems only days before the 2016 election. The document describes how Russian operatives tried to use a spear-phishing email scheme to target government officials and employees.


reality-winner-headshot2.jpg

NSA contractor Reality Winner

 

The classified information was allegedly given to The Intercept by NSA contractor Reality Leigh Winner, 25, according to multiple reports. NBC News reported a federal official said Winner had supplied the report to The Intercept in May.

 

Winner, who has worked as a contractor at Pluribus International Corporation in Georgia since Feb. 13, was arrested by the FBI at her home over the weekend. Department of Justice officials said Winner is being charged with sending classified material to a news outlet. She is scheduled to appear at a Thursday detention hearing before a federal judge. She faces up to 10 years in prison.

 

“Releasing classified material without authorization threatens our nation’s security and undermines public faith in government,” said Deputy Attorney General Rod J. Rosenstein in a statement. “People who are trusted with this classified information and pledge to protect it must be held accountable when they violate that obligation.”

According to the NSA report, Russian military intelligence officials from the Russian General Staff Main Intelligence Directorate, or GRU, targeted an unnamed U.S. election software company in August and October 2016. The report describes a product made by VR systems, which is a Florida-based company that provides electronic voting services and equipment in eight states, the New York Post reported.

 

 

Who is Reality Leigh Winner? 

Just who is this NSA contractor who took highly classified information to a U.S. news organization?

Winner was raised in Kingsville, Texas, and is an Air Force veteran who served on active duty from December 2010 to December 2016 as a cryptologic language analyst with a top-secret security clearance. Her last duty station was at Fort Mead in Maryland, where she served as a senior airman, rank of E4. Winner is fluent in the languages of Afghanistan, including Pashto, Farsi and Dari.

 

Winner is also apparently a supporter of failed presidential candidate Bernie Sanders and various liberal causes and icons, such as Michael Moore and Bill Maher. On Twitter, she follows Edward Snowden, WikiLeaks, Anonymous and “alt” government agency accounts. She’s a supporter of “The Resistance,” the “Women’s March” and the Islamic Society of North America.

 

And she’s certainly no fan of President Trump, whom she said she wanted to “resist.”

Reality-Winner3.jpg

Reality Winner became a real loser

 

Winner – an environmentalist who lifts weights, teaches yoga and watches “Dr. Who” with her cat – called Trump a “piece of s–t” in a Facebook post concerning the Dakota Access Pipeline protests. Her Facebook post stated:

“You have got to be s–tting me right now. No one has called? The White House shut down their phone lines. There have been protests for months, at both the drilling site and and outside the White House. I’m losing my mind. If you voted for this piece of –t, explain this. He’s lying. He’s blatantly lying and the second largest supply of freshwater in the country is now at risk. #NoDAPL #NeverMyPresident #Resist.”

 

 

Winner also met with staffers in the office of Sen. David Perdue, R-GA., earlier this year, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported. Perdue’s spokesman said the meeting was about “environmental issues.”

 

Winner said the meeting went “really well,” and she claimed she was “well heard” when she told Perdue’s staffers that lawmakers should “not be afraid to directly state when our president or his cabinet tell outright lies.”

Reality-Winner-YT.jpg

Winner, who also posted on Twitter as Sara Winners, called Trump an “orange fascist” and “the most dangerous” person in America. She blasted the president for “silencing” the Environmental Protection Agency in a post with the hashtag #F—ingWall.

Reality-Winner-Trump-TW.jpg

She called President Trump a “soulless ginger orangutan” in a Facebook post about climate change three months ago.

 

Winner argued that climate change is a more pressing issue than health care “since not poisoning an entire population seems to be more in line with ‘health’ care, and not the disease care system that people voted for a soulless ginger orangutan to ‘fix.'”

And she doesn’t want kids because she “worr[ies] enough about the impact of climate change on my cats.”

Perhaps most disturbing of all: In a hypothetical war between the U.S. and Iran, Winner said she would “stand” with Iran.

 

The following was her reply to a Feb. 7 tweet by Iranian Foreign Minister Javad Zarif: “There are many Americans protesting US govt aggression towards Iran. If our Tangerine in Chief declares war, we stand with you!”

Winner-Iran-TW.jpg

Winner posted that tweet less than a week before beginning her job as a federal contractor with a top-secret security clearance.

 

Reality-Winner2.jpg

Reality Winner, a white-hating loser

 

Winner also believes “being white is terrorism,” according to a Feb. 25 tweet. And she’s a major supporter of the Black Lives Matter movement.

She has tweeted the hashtags #TrumpIsAC–t,” #NotMyWall and #NotMyPresident.

 

Before the 2016 election, she posted the following Facebook comment, which has since been removed from the site: “On a positive note, this Tuesday when we become the United States of the Russian Federation, Olympic lifting will be the national sport.”

Reality-Winner-FB.jpg

On his show Tuesday, talk-radio kingpin Rush Limbaugh said Winner “is typical of American millennial youth today on the left”:


She has been totally radicalized. She hates Donald Trump. She hates the Republican Party. She hates conservatism. Where would she become radicalized like this? Well, obviously wherever she went to school she was radicalized, but I would maintain that she has been radicalized by American pop culture as well. …

 

This is Reality Winner. There’s nothing about this woman’s name that makes sense to me. The reality of what she’s done is not a winner. It’s a losing proposition. She is a Bernie Sanders supporter. She is a Trump resister. You know, why obsess over Russian hacks when any idiot can walk into a company working with the NSA and steal any damn secret they want? Why worry about Russia?

 

When somebody like this, a 25-year-old anti-Trumper, anti-American, pro-Bernie Sanders can get hold of this kind of stuff, why worry about the Russians hacking anything?

 

We’ve got our own domestic people hacking and leaking. And now leaking has become politicized. Leaking is a crime. And we’re eliminating the criminal aspect to it because the leaks the left likes happen to be leaks against Trump. So we’re gonna eliminate the fact that there’s criminal activity going on here and we are going to start celebrating leakers as whistleblowers.

Winner’s mother, Billie Winner Davis, told reporters Tuesday that her daughter is a good woman who does “what’s right.”

“She’s got a good heart,” Winner-Davis said. “She serves her community. She served her country. She believes in always doing what’s right.”

Her stepfather, Gary Davis, described Winner as a “patriot.”

 

“I know my daughter. She’s a patriot,” he said Tuesday. “She served with distinction in one of the highest classified jobs in the Air Force.”

Winner’s attorney, Titus Thomas Nichols, told ABC News, “She’s a good person with no criminal history who is caught in a political whirlwind.”

The Justice Department says Winner has admitted to printing a classified intelligence document, even though she didn’t have a “need to know” and she was aware the report was classified. Winner also reportedly admitted to taking the NSA report from her office and mailing it to the news organization. The Intercept claims it doesn’t know who actually provided the classified documents.

 

 

Late Monday evening, WikiLeaks Founder Julian Assange tweeted support for Winner. He wrote: “Alleged NSA whistleblower Reality Leigh Winner must be supported. She is a young woman accused of courage in trying to help us know.

 

Assange also tweeted: “It doesn’t matter why she did it or the quality [of] the report. Acts of non-elite sources communicating knowledge should be strongly encouraged.”

Assange-winner-TW2.jpg

 

What’s in the NSA report? Russian hackers’ ‘cyber espionage mandate’

The NSA document states that the hackers were given a “cyber espionage mandate specifically directed at U.S. and foreign elections.”

The Russian operatives reportedly sent election software employees fake emails that appeared to be from Google on Aug. 24, 2016. In October, the hackers used an “operational” Gmail account and pretended to be a VR Systems employee. They used a spear-phishing attack “targeting US local government organizations,” according to the NSA. The Russian hackers sent the emails to at least 122 email addresses “associated with named local government organizations” on Oct. 31 or Nov. 1.

 

It is suspected the spear-phishing emails were also sent to officials “involved in the management of voter registration systems,” the NSA report states.

“The emails were said to have contained weaponized Microsoft Word attachments, which were set up to appear as unharmful documentation for the VR Systems’ EViD voter database — but were actually embedded with automated software commands that are secretly turned on as soon as the user opens the document,” the New York Post reported. “The hack ultimately gave the Russians a back door and the ability to deliver any sort of malware or malicious software they wanted, the report says.”

 

The NSA document also indicates there were two other incidents of Russian attempts to interfere. In one case, the hackers pretended to be with another voting company, referenced in the NSA report as “US company 2,” and they offered “election-related products and services” in their emails. In another case, they sent emails to the American Samoa Election Office and tried to target more accounts.

reality-winner-pond-600.jpeg

Reality Leigh Winner, 25, has been accused by the U.S. Department of Justice of sending classified material to a news organization.

 

There has been no indication of what the Russian operatives were actually able to accomplish, if anything at all.

The NSA report claims they were focused on “mimicking a legitimate absentee ballot-related service provider.”

“It is unknown, whether the aforementioned spear-phishing deployment successfully compromised the intended victims, and what potential data could have been accessed by the cyber actor,” the NSA document stated.

Limbaugh noted Tuesday that the NSA document does not indicate the Russians actually hacked the U.S. election or even influenced it:


[I]t’s a phishing campaign. It’s not a hack. That’s putting a fine point on it. What the document says is that the Russians, or if anybody, whoever was behind this, was trying to find their way into voter registration rolls, if anything, that is what was going on. They were not tampering with votes that had been cast. In fact, I think all of this is smoke and mirrors. With so much fake news out there, with so many things in the news that have been provably, demonstrably inaccurate and wrong, this is just too convenient.

 

But even if it is true, the only thing the document alleges is that the Russians were attempting to spear phish certain areas of voter registration roles, not the counting or tabulating or casting of votes in any way, shape, manner or form. But I even get antsy even acknowledging that as a possibility, because I think it’s all just too pat. Where’s this stuff been?

 

Look, there are plenty of people that have access to this document that hate Trump that could have gotten this out way before today, way before yesterday, whenever this happened. And they could have gotten it out to a website far more mainstream than something called The Intercept.

 

But this keeps all the big guys’ fingerprints off of it so we can’t question their motives. All they do is end up reporting this, dotting the I’s and crossing the T’s to add so-called credibility to it. I’m suspicious and dubious of all of this.

VR Systems does not sell voting machines, though it does have contracts in New York, California, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, North Carolina, Virginia and West Virginia, the New York Post reported.

 

However, Pamela Smith, president of Verified Voting, told The Intercept: “If someone has access to a state voter database, they can take malicious action by modifying or removing information. This could affect whether someone has the ability to cast a regular ballot, or be required to cast a ‘provisional’ ballot — which would mean it has to be checked for their eligibility before it is included in the vote. And it may mean the voter has to jump through certain hoops such as proving their information to the election official before their eligibility is affirmed.”

 

VR Systems’ Chief Operating Officer Ben Martin told the Intercept: “Phishing and spear-phishing are not uncommon in our industry. We regularly participate in cyber alliances with state officials and members of the law enforcement community in an effort to address these types of threats. We have policies and procedures in effect to protect our customers and our company.”


Edited by Zharkov, 07 June 2017 - 02:04 PM.

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#336 Zharkov

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Posted 07 June 2017 - 02:10 PM

The fact is that, because of perpetual hacking with fishing emails, everyone already knows how it is done, so that is not secret, not even remotely close to being secret.

 

No doubt every country does it, Britain, China, USA, they all "go fishing" with email.   

 

The other important fact is that Trump got elected by American votes, not by some mythical hacking.  

The alleged hacking didn't change a single vote.

 

It certainly did not change my vote.    Trump is the winner, and at NSA, winners become losers.

 

NSA is anti-Trump because it still reeks of Obama people.   It's time to clean their cage.


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#337 Zharkov

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Posted 07 June 2017 - 03:01 PM

AUGUSTA, Ga. — The family of an intelligence contractor who allegedly leaked a highly classified document about Russian interference in the U.S. election told NBC News that "she would not jeopardize anybody's safety."

Reality Winner, a 25-year-old who worked at the National Security Agency, has been charged with providing the report to The Intercept, an online news organization. Winner's mother said her daughter was "terrified" when she returned to her Augusta home Saturday to find armed federal agents waiting for her.

"Her words to me was that she was scared she was going to be ... they were going to make her disappear," mother Billie Davis-Winner said Tuesday.

 

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

 

No, she won't be "disappeared".    Her alleged crime was leaking classified information that maybe, possibly, (who knows?) hackers from Russia tried to "fish" some election emails.   The information should not have been classified at all - everyone knows how "fishing" works, and we all know intel agencies do it.

 

Let's say the US government decided to classify the geometric shape of a triangle as secret because the fins on a missile resemble a triangle.

 

We all know what a triangle looks like, so its shape is not at all a secret.

 

But leaking that shape to the news media would still be a crime under US law simply because the classification was made, not because it involved really secret stuff, but only because a classification means no disclosure can legally be made.    If Clinton had classified Monica's blue dress, the FBI would never have revealed that the stain on it was Clinton's DNA.   So the real evil is the classification of obvious facts to keep them from the public.    Leaking those facts is hardly worth punishing, because it is a public service.    The difference between a whistleblower and a traitor is often a fuzzy line that  is undefined until a court decides what it is.   


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#338 Zharkov

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Posted 07 June 2017 - 04:04 PM

"The spying by our government on Americans cannot be tolerated, and it is being tolerated," Rep. Ted Poe, a conservative Texas Republican, said in a telephone interview.

Poe blamed the National Security Agency for overreaching its authority, and said he would not be surprised if the agency's employees were surveilling people like himself, a former criminal court judge.

"Nothing would surprise me about what the NSA does. Unfortunately, they cannot be trusted," said Poe, who sits on the House Judiciary Committee that will weigh reauthorization.

Elsewhere on Capitol Hill, others also fretted about temptations for intelligence community employees to turn the surveillance apparatus on Americans.

“To folks in that world, it’s like crack cocaine,” said an aide to another Republican congressman, who spoke without authorization of the aide’s boss and asked for anonymity. “You’ve got to get the genie back in the box, and that’s really hard.”

 

http://www.mcclatchy...e154688804.html


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#339 Zharkov

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Posted 07 June 2017 - 04:11 PM

Flynn lasted only 24 days in Trump’s White House, and is being investigated for failure to initially acknowledge foreign payments from Russian and Turkish entities, amounting to more than half a million dollars.

The revelations that sparked Flynn’s resignation in February revolved around his telephone contacts with Russia’s ambassador to the United States, which were electronically captured by the U.S. intelligence community and leaked to The Washington Post.

 

“He said, ‘I will vote for sunset over re-authorization.’ I had never heard a Republican say that,” Rizer said, declining to identify the lawmaker.

Some lawmakers think re-authorization is in trouble without significant reforms.

“They don’t have the votes to pass it. It is that bad,” the Republican aide said.

 

 

 

http://www.mcclatchy...e154688804.html


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#340 Zharkov

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Posted 07 June 2017 - 10:11 PM

James Clapper, Obama Puppet - The Guy Who Lied To Congress About Wiretapping America!

The man privy to America's darkest intelligence secrets for the past six years has predicted Russian links to the Trump administration will dwarf the 1970s Watergate scandal which sunk the Nixon presidency.
Key points:

    Former US intelligence chief James Clapper (Pronounced "James Crapper" in Chinese) says Watergate scandal nothing compared to Trump's Russia links
    Says Russian meddling in US election constitutes an 'assault' on the United States
    Clapper slams Trump administration's hostility towards US government institutions

James Clapper was until January the US director of national intelligence — the Obama administration's eyes, (mouth)  and ears on America's enormous surveillance community, including the CIA, NSA and elements of the FBI.

In that role he watched (alleged and still unproven) Russian meddling in the months leading up to the presidential election last November, and has concluded it made a concerted and determined attempt to derail Mr Trump's opponent, Hillary Clinton.

"I lived through Watergate. I was on active duty then in the Air Force, I was a young officer. It was a scary time," Mr Clapper told the National Press Club in Canberra.

    "I have to say though, I think if you compare the two that Watergate pales, really, in my view, compared to what we're confronting now."

President Richard Nixon was forced to resign in 1974 after it was revealed Republican operatives had broken into the Watergate Hotel to bug rooms used by their Democratic opponents.

Russian meddling an (imaginary) 'assault' on the US

Mr Clapper said Russia's interference in the 2016 presidential election was an "assault" on the US, and the President's pro-Russia stance was "inexplicable".

"Social media trolls planted false factual information, orchestrated fake truthful news — which many other news outlets picked up and amplified either wittingly or unwittingly — and a very sophisticated campaign by the regime-funded propaganda arm … against Hillary Clinton and for Donald Trump" he said.

"Their first objective was to sow doubt, discontent and discord about our political system. They achieved, I'm sure, beyond their wildest expectations. Given their success, they have only been emboldened to be even more aggressive in the future."

Former FBI chief Robert Mueller is currently assembling a team to investigate possible collusion between Russia and Mr Trump's campaign.

Mr Clapper said he was bewildered the President was not more hostile to the Russian regime.

    "I've had a real hard time reconciling the threat the Russians pose to the United States and, by extension, Western democracies in general, with inexplicably so solicitous stance the Trump administration, or others in it, has taken with respect to Russia," he said.

Mr Clapper's speech came just days ahead of a highly anticipated Senate committee hearing with sacked FBI director James Comey.

The US media has reported Mr Trump tried to pressure Mr Comey to drop an investigation into Moscow's links with the President's then national security adviser.

Mr Clapper said he would be "very interested" to hear Mr Comey's evidence — who he said had been "inexcusably" sacked by Mr Trump.

"As I have often said, it is absolutely crucial for the United States, and for that matter for the world, for this presidency, for the Republicans, for the Democrats and for our nation at large, that we get to the bottom of this," he said.

"Is there a smoking gun with all the (alleged but unproven) smoke? I don't know the answer to that. I think it's vital, though, we find that out."

 

US institutions 'under assault' (By NSA and CIA, who else?)

Mr Clapper also launched a furious attack on Mr Trump's performance in office, saying his hostility towards US government institutions did enormous damage to the country.

(Former) US national intelligence director James Clapper

Photo: Former top US Globalist servant, James Clapper, says he will be interested to hear sacked FBI director James Comey's evidence. (Reuters: Kevin Lamarque)

"I'm ever the optimist so I do have great faith and confidence — even though they are under assault — in our basic institutions," he said.

"That is not unlimited, though, so the question is: how long can these assaults go on and the institutions not be irrevocably damaged?"

He also gave a withering account of Mr Trump's behaviour since he came to office. He accused the President and his administration of disparaging the intelligence community's assessment of serious Russian interference in the election.  (Only because US intel is seriously stupid to put up with anti-Trump political crap.)

    "This was prompted, I found … by his and his team's extreme paranoia about and resentment of any doubt cast on the legitimacy of his election, which of course our assessment did."   (The mental patient calling the doctor "crazy"?)


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