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NSA's Dirty Work Exposed

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#21 Zharkov

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Posted 06 January 2014 - 03:59 PM

NSA won't say whether it spies on Congress

Posted by
CNN's Conor Finnegan

Washington (CNN) - Congress is just like everyone else. That's the message the National Security Agency has for Sen. Bernie Sanders.

The independent senator from Vermont sent a letter to the agency Friday, asking whether it has or is "spying" on members of Congress and other elected American officials.


The NSA provided a preliminary response Saturday that said
Congress has "the same privacy protections as all U.S. persons."   (Which is almost none)

http://politicaltick...es-on-congress/

 

$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

 

Spooks have to make a living, don't they?

Congressional representatives make a lot of secret big money deals in Congress with the defense and pharmaceutical industries, among others.

NSA needs to know.   It all goes into their permanent record.


Edited by Zharkov, 06 January 2014 - 04:00 PM.

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#22 Zharkov

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Posted 08 January 2014 - 05:30 PM

NSA Is Spying On Congress

Washington’s Blog
January 8, 2014

The NSA pretty much
admitted to spying on Congress this week.

It’s not the first time.  David Sirota notes:

    When I asked U.S. Rep. Alan Grayson (D-Fla.) if the NSA was keeping files on his colleagues, he recounted a meeting between NSA officials and lawmakers in the lead-up to a closely contested House vote to better regulate the agency:

        “One of my colleagues asked the NSA point blank will you give me a copy of my own record and the NSA said no, we won’t. They didn’t say no we don’t have one. They said no we won’t. So that’s possible.”

    Grayson is right: presumably, if the NSA wasn’t tracking lawmakers, it would have flatly denied it. Instead, those officials merely denied lawmakers access to whatever files the agency might have. That suggests one of two realities:

 

1) the NSA is keeping files on lawmakers
2) the NSA isn’t keeping files on lawmakers, but answered vaguely in order to stoke fear among legislators that it is.

Sirota notes the danger of even the threat of spying on the legislature:

    Regardless of which of these realities happens to be the case, the mere existence of legitimate fears of congressional surveillance by an executive-branch agency is a serious legal and separation-of-powers problem. Why? Because whether or not the surveillance is actually happening, the very real possibility that it even could be happening orhas happened can unduly intimidate the legislative branch into abrogating its constitutional oversight responsibilities. In this particular case, it can scare congressional lawmakers away from voting to better regulate the NSA.

And the Atlantic points out:

   
Access to that telephone metadata would be extremely useful for manipulating the legislature.

    Should anyone doubt how much mischief could come from spying on even one member of Congress, let’s look back at the story of former Democratic Representative Jane Harman and what happened when the NSA intercepted and transcribed one of her telephone calls. That’s right: There’s a known instance in which a legislator’s private communications were captured by the NSA, though it’s a complicated story….

    The story begins with the NSA surveilling two Israeli nationals suspected of being spies. Unbeknownst to them, their phone calls were being recorded by the NSA–and one day, a conversation with Harman got swept up in the ongoing wiretap. No one on the call knew it was being recorded.

    “One of the leading House Democrats on intelligence matters was overheard on telephone calls intercepted by the National Security Agency agreeing to seek lenient treatment from the Bush administration for two pro-Israel lobbyists who were under investigation for espionage,” the New York Times reported on April 20, 2009, following up on a story broken by Congressional Quarterly’s Jeff Stein.

   
Congressional Quarterly reported that a criminal case against Jane Harman was dropped because she was a useful ally to the Bush Administration:

        Justice Department attorneys in the intelligence and public corruption units who read the transcripts decided that Harman had committed a “completed crime,” a legal term meaning that there was evidence that she had attempted to complete it, three former officials said. And they were prepared to open a case on her, which would include electronic surveillance approved by the so-called FISA Court …

        First, however, they needed the certification of top intelligence officials that Harman’s wiretapped conversations justified a national security investigation … But that’s when, according to knowledgeable officials, Attorney General Gonzales intervened. According to two officials privy to the events, Gonzales said he “needed Jane” to help support the administration’s warrantless wiretapping program, which was about to be exposed by the New York Times.

        Harman, he told Goss, had helped persuade the newspaper to hold the wiretap story before, on the eve of the 2004 elections. And although it was too late to stop the Times from publishing now, she could be counted on again to help defend the program.

        He was right.

        On Dec. 21, 2005, in the midst of a firestorm of criticism about the wiretaps, Harman issued a statement defending the operation and slamming the Times, saying, “I believe it essential to U.S. national security, and that its disclosure has damaged critical intelligence capabilities.”

We noted last month that
the NSA has previously spied on congress members for improper purposes:

    During the Vietnam war, the NSA spied on two prominent politicians – Senators Frank Church and Howard Baker – as well as critics of government policy Muhammad Ali, Martin Luther King, and a Washington Post humorist.

   
A recently declassified history written by the NSA itself called the effort “disreputable if not outright illegal.”

    The main whistleblower who revealed the Vietnam-era spying was Christopher H. Pyle. Pyle told Rob Kall of OpEdNews:

            They targeted Sen. Frank Church and Sen. Howard Baker. It could mean they were trying to get information or dirt on senators involved in the Church committee and Watergate committee investigations respectively — either to learn something about their investigations or to discredit them.

            We still need more information about what happened then. But more critically, we need more information about what’s happening now. These revelations raise the obvious question:If the NSA was targeting people like Sen. Frank Church, who were in a position to oversee the NSA — is that happening now? That is, are people like intelligence committee chairs Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.), Rep. Mike Rogers (R-Mich.) and other congressional leaders — who are supposed to be providing oversight themselves — compromised in some way by the NSA? If so, as seems quite certain from the recent Edward Snowden revelations, then how can they conduct genuine oversight of the NSA with their committees?”

            If I were a member of congress, I would be terrified that NSA would do to them what J. Edgar Hoover did to members back during his time.

    Sound paranoid?

    Maybe. But remember:

        The NSA has been tracking people’s porn in order to discredit them. The New York Times reports that this type of behavior has been going on for a long time: “J. Edgar Hoover compiled secret dossiers on the sexual peccadillos and private misbehavior of those he labeled as enemies — really dangerous people like … President John F. Kennedy, for example”.

        A high-level NSA whistleblower says that the
NSA is spying on – and blackmailing – top government officials and military officers, including Supreme Court Justices, high-ranked generals, Colin Powell and other State Department personnel, and many other top officials

        Another very high-level NSA whistleblower – the head of the NSA’s global intelligence gathering operation – says that the NSA targeted CIA chief Petraeus

     

       
Blackmail of Congress members may be common

     

Indeed, because the NSA’s raw information is shared with Israel, it is possible that the Israeli government is blackmailing our congress members. The Guardian reported in September:

    The National Security Agency routinely shares raw intelligence data with Israel without first sifting it to remove information about US citizens, a top-secret document provided to the Guardian by whistleblower Edward Snowden reveals.

    According to the agreement, the intelligence being shared would not be filtered in advance by NSA analysts to remove US communications. “NSA routinely sends ISNU [the Israeli Sigint National Unit] minimized and unminimized raw collection”, it says.

    A much stricter rule was set for US government communications found in the raw intelligence. The Israelis were required to “destroy upon recognition” any communication “that is either to or from an official of the US government“. Such communications included those of “officials of the executive branch (including the White House, cabinet departments, and independent agencies), the US House of Representatives and Senate (member and staff) and the US federal court system (including, but not limited to, the supreme court)”.

And it’s not just the NSA.

Last year, Eric Holder refused to say whether the Department of Justice was spying on Congress.

When one branch of government spies on another,
“America has no functioning democracy”.

http://www.infowars....ng-on-congress/


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#23 vladzo

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Posted 08 January 2014 - 06:11 PM

hey zharkov :::: i am not intenionaly changing topics; infact, i believe this is the same general topic.

 

as i asked you on another thread;

??? what do you think of the terrorists in boston and volgograd ???

 

?? did the CIA finance this new international terrorism ??

? is this not alqueda, and was alqueda not started by the CIA ?

 

vlad


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#24 Zharkov

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Posted 09 January 2014 - 12:50 AM

hey zharkov :::: i am not intenionaly changing topics; infact, i believe this is the same general topic.

 

as i asked you on another thread;

??? what do you think of the terrorists in boston and volgograd ???

 

?? did the CIA finance this new international terrorism ??

? is this not alqueda, and was alqueda not started by the CIA ?

 

vlad

 

====================================================================================

There is a CIA within the CIA that specializes in advancing a specific, globalist agenda.

They keep their strategies secret from the rank and file of the agency.

And one of those strategies is to employ and supply terrorists.

When lower level employees eventually discover what they are part of, they usually quit and sometimes write books about it.

Mossad, Saudi intelligence, and others use terrorists also.

 

Boston looks like a CIA operation because the alleged suspects had CIA connections.

Volgograd looks more like a Saudi intelligence covert operation.


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#25 vladzo

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Posted 09 January 2014 - 01:49 AM

@ zharkov ::::

 

very interesting idea about the saudi connection.

 

they jhave an electric fence to keep out iraqis, but they also want to kill russians for being christian or what is it

 

vlad


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#26 Zharkov

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Posted 10 January 2014 - 04:03 PM

Morality versus the National Security State

Jacob G. Hornberger
Future of Freedom Foundation

One of the horrible consequences of the national-security state apparatus that was grafted onto America’s governmental system is how it has oftentimes placed Americans in the position of choosing between morality and obedience to the law.

Just this week, we have been reminded of the conflict between morality and law back in 1971, during the height of the Cold War, the “war” that was used to justify the existence of the national-security state apparatus in the first place.

The federal government was illegally targeting American citizens who were protesting and demonstrating against the national-security state’s war in Vietnam. In a free society, people are free to protest and demonstrate against anything they want.  Freedom entails letting the government know that one is opposed to what it is doing. Freedom entails having the right to persuade government that it is doing wrong and to change direction. Freedom entails persuading other people to take a stand against government wrongdoing.


It’s the government’s job to leave protestors and demonstrators alone and to protect their exercise of freedom in the event other people try to interfere with their free-speech activities.

That’s not what the federal government did in 1971. It went after antiwar activists. Its position was: We’re at war against the communists. You’re either with us or you’re against us. If you’re protesting and demonstrating against our war, that puts you on the side of the communists. Since you’re with the communists, you’re part of the enemy forces. You’re dividing our country. We need to target you. We need to destroy you.

So, the feds started engaging in illegal activity against peaceful people who were doing nothing more than opposing the national-security state’s illegal and immoral war in Vietnam. They began spying on them, conducting surveillance on them, tracking them, infiltrating them, and keeping files on them, all the while falsely denying that they were engaged in such illegal activity.

So, a group of antiwar activists broke into an FBI office and stole FBI files that showed that the FBI had been lying the entire time and that it in fact had been engaged in illegal surveillance of American citizens.


The irony is that while the national-security state was fighting a war thousands of miles away supposedly to keep the United States from falling to the communists, what it was doing to American protestors and demonstrators was precisely what communist regimes were doing to their own citizens. What’s fascinating is that while national-security state officials could recognize the evil nature of secret surveillance by communist regimes, they couldn’t recognize the evil nature of what they themselves were doing. When the communists did it, it was considered bad. When U.S. officials did it, it was considered good.

Even today, there are federal officials and former federal officials who say that what those antiwar protestors did was wrong and that they should have been punished for it. But why is it morally wrong for citizens to break the law when breaking the law is necessary to disclose government illegality? If the government has chosen to break the law and is falsely denying it, then why shouldn’t citizens be praised for breaking the law to disclose government’s illegal conduct?

Of course though, the more fundamental question is:
Why should the government be involved in immoral or illegal activity? Yet, isn’t immoral and illegal activity the very essence of the national-security state apparatus that has now become a permanent part of America’s governmental structure, especially since much of what it does is conducted in secret?

Consider the Edward Snowden revelations of a massive super-secret surveillance scheme by the U.S. national-security state on the entire American populace, not to mention millions of people all over the world. Where do they get the constitutional authorization for that? Is there a constitutional provision that empowers them to do that?

No! The only justification is the same one that the national-security state has always cited for its exercise of secret, covert operations: “national security,” a term that isn’t even found in the Constitution and has no objective meaning.

Why shouldn’t the American people decide whether they want to be spied on in this way? Isn’t the citizenry supposed to be the ones in control? Aren’t federal officials supposed to be mere servants, with the citizenry as their bosses?

So, the only way to disclose what the servants were doing to their bosses, and without their consent or knowledge, was for Edward Snowden to reveal to the American people what the servants were doing to their bosses. For that, he’s been condemned and vilified by the U.S. national-security state. They want to punish the guy, perhaps even execute him for being a “traitor,” in the same way that their predecessors in 1971 wanted to punish those antiwar activists who burglarized that FBI office to get the files that showed that the FBI was lying and was in fact engaged in illegal activity.

In moral terms, Snowden did the right thing. Sure, he violated some secrecy agreement that he signed when he began working for the government. But which has paramount importance — some secrecy contract or the disclosure of a dark, immoral, illegal secret that entails wrongful conduct by the government?

There is circumstantial evidence that the Pentagon and the CIA were involved in the assassination of two American citizens, Charles Horman and Frank Teruggi, during the Chilean coup in 1973. If a CIA agent, in a crisis of conscience, had disclosed the assassination scheme beforehand and saved the lives of Horman and Teruggi, there is no doubt that U.S. officials would have prosecuted them and punished him for breaking his CIA secrecy agreement, especially since the assassination of Horman and Teruggi were part of a covert operation involving “national security,” the term that has come to immunize national-security state officials from criminal prosecution. Indeed, neither the Justice Department nor Congress has ever dared to investigate the Horman and Teruggi murders.

From a moral standpoint, wouldn’t that have been a great thing for that CIA agent to do? By breaking his secrecy agreement and disclosing the assassination plot, that agent would have saved the lives of two innocent Americans. Isn’t that something that would have been worth praising, not condemning?

The real question though is: Why is our government involved with assassinating people, or spying on people, or torturing people, or involving America in destructive foreign wars where American military personnel are called upon to kill and die for nothing, or with so many other immoral actions? Is this really what the Founding Fathers intended when they called the federal government into existence?

When one examines issues such as these, everything ends up pointing to the national-security state apparatus that was grafted onto our governmental system after World War II. The Cold War, the irrational fear of communists and communists, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, foreign aid to dictators, sanctions, embargoes, regime change operations, assassinations, invasions, the irrational fear of terrorists and terrorism, the war on terrorism, Gitmo, indefinite detention, torture, the TSA, the Patriot Act, and Homeland Security.


The common denominator of it all is the omnipotent national-security state military empire whose officials now wield totalitarian-like powers with impunity and immunity. People should be praised for breaking the law to reveal its wrongdoing. But the better route — the moral route — would be to dismantle it entirely and restore a limited-government constitutional republic to our land.

http://www.infowars....security-state/

 

=======================================================================================================

The article above is very good.   Governments, however, always have some lame excuse for doing what they want.

 

The U.S. government would claim an inherent right exists to protect themselves and their authority - the right of self-defense of the state - to justify domestic wire tapping without a warrant or probable cause.    They would argue that when the state apparatus itself is in jeopardy from destruction, there are no limits to its power.    The U.S. Declaration Of Independence clearly demolishes that argument.

 

And the argument is false.   The U.S. government would not exist except for the constitution that created it.    The federal government has only the powers granted by the constitution and nothing more.   And there are no circumstances which suggest that the federal government is in danger of destruction.

 

The 4th Amendment destroys the government claim that wire tapping is lawful without a warrant or probable cause, even if a secret FISA court agrees with them.    No court can rewrite the 4th Amendment, an amendment which means exactly what it says - and it says that unwarranted wire tapping is unconstitutional and therefore illegal.   
 


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#27 Zharkov

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Posted 10 January 2014 - 04:34 PM

Learn to Encrypt Your Emails against an invasion of privacy by NSA
http://thehackernews...s-against.html#

 

Lawyers in America have a huge problem - they face a horrible dilemma of having to choose whether to communicate with a client and allow NSA to violate the confidentiality of the attorney-client relationship, or not communicate with the client and be sued by the client and punished by the Bar for failing to communicate.    Clients cannot always meet face to face with counsel.   Many clients reside outside the U.S., including multinational corporations.   They do not want government employees receiving inside information on corporate plans and problems.

 

Most clients do not like having to decrypt messages from their lawyers - changing password keys is a constant irritation; missing a message because of the extra effort and time required for decryption is always a problem.    Clients sueing government officials have no assurance that their contacts with their lawyers will be kept confidential from their opponent.   It's a real mess that no State Bar Association has bothered to discuss with their members.

 

Lawyers are in the position of being forced to trust the government not to reveal client confidences even when it is the government that is the target of a lawsuit, for there are no guarantees that government officials will obey the law prohibiting the use of the illegally obtained communication.

 

What should have immediately happened, but did not, would be lawsuits against the NSA filed by the State Bar Associations and the Attorneys General of all 50 states for illegal interference with State Bar Rules of Professional Ethics and violations of the 4th Amendment, among other issues.

 

The legal communities of all nations should be protesting - in court - over NSA wiretapping.


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#28 Zharkov

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Posted 11 January 2014 - 06:35 PM

“Where I see it going is toward a totalitarian state. You’ve got the NSA doing all this collecting of material on all of its citizens – that’s what the S.S., the Gestapo, the Stasi, the KGB, and the MVD did,” says William Binney referencing the National Security Agency’s (NSA) collection of personal data on American citizens.

Binney, a former intelligence official, left the NSA in 2001 after more than 30 years with the agency. Since resigning, he has gone before Congress and the Department of Defense in an effort to bring accountability to the NSA.

http://www.infowars....ernment-spying/

 

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Military code word meaning "Direct all fire on my position!!"

The military term "calling in fire on your own position" is easy to understand once you get past its suicidal logic: If you're being overrun by the enemy, you get on the radio and tell your own artillery to start shooting at you.

Sure, it will probably kill you, but if you're outnumbered and dug in deeply, the chances are the bombardment will kill more of the enemy.

It's what you do when you've run out of options.


Edited by Zharkov, 11 January 2014 - 06:52 PM.

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#29 Asterix

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Posted 11 January 2014 - 08:30 PM

Americans are suicidal. It's typical of primitive verterbrates.

RO on the subject of americans

PSM_V82_D438_Head_of_an_embryo_frog.png
Taken from an article entitled "Problems in evolution"

Fig. 8. Head of an Embryo Frog, showing the three pairs of primitive jaws derived from their invertebrate ancestors, and their union to form the unpaired jaws typical of the vertebrates.

 
http://en.wikisource...em_in_Evolution
You know what I mean, there are cow boys full of shit
or BRUTUS in the Movie bellow, same thing

Edited by Asterix, 11 January 2014 - 08:52 PM.

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#30 Zharkov

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Posted 12 January 2014 - 03:15 PM

Somehow, it seems the point of "Broken Arrow" was lost in translation.  

English is a tricky language with subtle nuances.

 

The point was that the retired American intelligence community is now calling for open investigations of what they had been told to do and what they are presently doing - essentially "calling in fire on its own position".   

 

Not suicidal, but patriotic and brave, especially considering what the U.S. government wants to do to Mr. Snowden.  

 

Former spooks want everyone to see how twisted and corrupt the U.S. government has become.   

 

They want "transparency" for a profession that cannot function transparently.   They want corruption visible for everyone to see.


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#31 Colombo

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Posted 13 January 2014 - 02:50 AM

I've long advocated the idea of simply printing enough money to satisfy everyone.  We lost the gold standard yet we all survived (figuritevly speaking).  Printing warehouses full of money should have no dramatic negative effect, provided everyone stays calm.  It was panic that caused the crash in 1929, and if the economy crashes like that again, it will once again be due to panic.  The big problem may not be printing too much money, but rather the absurd distribution of all that fresh cash.  (Most of it is never printed, by-the-way, it just travels between oligarchs' bank accounts on paper.)  The first stop that money makes is in the hands of some banking or corporate giant, and from there the so called "trickle-down economy" is relied upon to place the money where it is needed.  How about a "trickle-up-economy" instead?  If support for people like Edward Snowden continues to grow, such a movement could lead to Earth shaking changes like that.


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#32 Zharkov

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 01:06 AM

NSA Data Have No Impact on Terrorism: Report

 

A public policy group says a review of U.S. terrorist arrests shows the government’s collection of bulk phone records does little to prevent terrorism, adding fuel to a debate over whether the spy program should be ended.

The nonprofit New America Foundation, based in Washington, analyzed cases involving 225 people recruited by al-Qaeda or other terrorist groups and charged in the U.S. since the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks. The majority of cases started with traditional techniques, such as use of “informants, tips from local communities, and targeted intelligence operations,” according to a report today from the group, which has been critical of the NSA spy programs.

“Our investigation found that bulk collection of American phone metadata has had no discernible impact on preventing acts of terrorism and only the most marginal of impacts on preventing terrorist-related activity, such as fundraising for a terrorist group,” Peter Bergen, director of the foundation’s national security program, said in a statement.

NSA Director Keith Alexander and Director of National Intelligence James Clapper had defended the use of bulk records as being essential to disrupting dozens of domestic and international terrorist plots when it was first exposed in June by Snowden.

They since have backed off those claims.

http://www.bloomberg...ism-report.html


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#33 Zharkov

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 02:48 PM

Only a FOOL still believes the NSA

The NSA and other intelligence officials have been repeatedly caught lying about their spying programs.

Officials in the legislative, judicial and executive branches of government all say that the mass surveillance on Americans is unnecessary:

    3 Senators with top secret clearance “have reviewed this surveillance extensively and have seen no evidence that the bulk collection of Americans’ phone records has provided any intelligence of value that could not have been gathered through less intrusive means”

    Another Senator with top secret clearance agrees, and so does the congress member who wrote the Patriot Act, and more than 100 congress members from both parties

    As does the official panel created by President Obama to review NSA spying, made up of top former White House officials and other government insiders, including the head of counter-terrorism under Clinton and Bush and former deputy CIA director Michael J. Morrell

    NBC News reports: A member of the White House review panel on NSA surveillance said he was “absolutely” surprised when he discovered the agency’s lack of evidence that the bulk collection of telephone call records had thwarted any terrorist attacks.“It was, ‘Huh, hello? What are we doing here?’” said Geoffrey Stone, a University of Chicago law professor….

    “That was stunning. That was the ballgame,” said one congressional intelligence official, who asked not to be publicly identified. “It flies in the face of everything that they have tossed at us.”

    The conclusions of the panel’s reports were at direct odds with public statements by President Barack Obama and U.S. intelligence officials.

    A non-profit, bipartisan policy group says that NSA mass surveillance has no impact on terrorism

    CNN terrrorism expert Peter Bergen says that mass surveillance is not needed to stop another 9/11

    Former president Clinton (and apparently Carter, as well), agree that mass surveillance is unnecessary

    As do the chairs of the 9/11 Commission which was created by Congress and the White House

    As does the counter-terrorism czar under the Clinton and Bush administrations, Richard Clarke. Andsee this

    As does a federal judge (and see this)

Top terrorism and security experts also agree, saying that:


    Mass spying by the NSA has never stopped a single terrorist attack

    Mass surveillance doesn’t protect us from terrorism

    Mass spying actually interferes with our ability to stop terrorism


Indeed, the NSA itself no longer claims that its mass spying program has stopped terror attacks or saved lives. Instead, intelligence spokesmen themselves now claim that mass spying is just an “insurance policy” to give “peace of mind”.

But given that mass surveillance by governments on their own people have always been used – for at least 500 years – to crush dissent, that the NSA has a long history of spying on Congress for political purposes, and that high-level NSA whistleblowers say that the NSA is using spying to blackmail politicians and social critics and to prosecute people the government dislikes, the question is whose peace of mind the programs preserve

And while the NSA claims that disclosure of its spying programs hurts America’s security, that’s what authoritarians always say. For example:

    When leakers disclosed that the FBI was conducting mass spying on – and smearing – anti-war Americans, attorney general John Mitchell said that the leaks would “endanger” the lives of government agents

    Founding Fathers Benjamin Franklin and Samuel Adams did exactly what Edward Snowden did … and were likewise labeled as traitors by the British government

So how can anyone believe the NSA at this point?

Unfortunately, fear of terror makes people unable to think straight … and when the government undertakes a large, idiotic project – like launching the Iraq war – many people will go to great lengths to grasp at straws to try to rationalize the government’s ill-conceived campaign.

The minority of Americans who believe the NSA have – sadly – fallen for the same trick …

 

 

(THIS ARTICLE ORIGINALLY APPEARED AT Washington’s Blog)
http://intellihub.co...l-believes-nsa/

 

============================================================================================

 

The suggestion that mass surveillance is "for insurance" means that those in power do not trust or even like their own citizens enough to leave them alone.   They are dangerous federal bullies pushing their way into our homes, our offices, our families, our conversations, even seeking our biometric markers.  

 

They are, by their conduct, begging Americans to throw them in prison.

=====================================================================

Now that we’ve learned how the NSA is able to view exactly what is on your monitor, let’s take a look at “SURLYSPAWN”. This particular hack allows NSA personnel to record and analyze keystrokes, even when the computer isn’t connected to the Internet. SURLYSPAWN is a hardware implant as well, and assists in the transmitting of what a user is typing. The slide noted that “An invisible signal emitted by the implant is modified by every keystroke, and then a radar signal emitted by a device located outside the building makes the implant’s invisible signal visible.”

Once the signal is visible, personnel around the target can see everything being stroked on the keyboard. Using similar processes as RAGEMASTER, the SURLYSPAWN hack requires the implant onto a keyboard.

Then there’s “COTTONMOUTH”: another hardware implant inserted into a USB drive. It is disguised as either a keyboard’s USB plug or a USB extension cord that can be connected between a device and the intended computer. Its role is either to intercept communications or to interject Trojans, while also being able to respond to other already-implanted COTTONMOUTH implants. COTTONMOUTH can monitor the network as well as command the computer and network.

Switching over to the computer in its entirety, “GINSU” is a software hack, which allows other NSA hardware and software programs like BULLDOZER and KONGUR to maintain its stay in the system. When installed, GINSU can catch system reboots and upgrades, so that when the upgrade or reboot takes place, the software is restored to the system. Leaving the target entirely infected, rebooted or not.

And don’t think your wireless LAN is free from constraint. Der Spiegel explains, “The NSA’s ANT division also develops methods for gaining access to wireless LAN networks from the outside, allowing them to tap into these networks and plant their own software on them.” This brings us to the NSA’s “NIGHTSTAND”, which can remotely insert data packets into various Windows systems. The list includes insertions of malware into the wireless networks’ traffic. NIGHTSTAND’s process is mobile and works up to 8 miles.

Some of the targets that NIGHTSTAND can successfully exploit include Win2k, WinXP and WinXPS1P2 running IE, and the packet injection can go after either one target or multiple targets, remaining undetectable by users. Overall, the NIGHTSTAND packet injection would be used during situations when the intended target has no access to a wired connection.

Unfortunately for the privacy advocates and opponents to the surveillance state, Der Spiegel, its journalists involved and Applebaum didn’t stop here. Other NSA backdoors include phone software/hardware hacks, which allow the remote ability to control the hotmic, camera, voicemail details and other areas in the mobile phone. In addition, it’s been revealed that the NSA’s personnel have successfully exploited larger server systems and firewalls with programs such as IRONCHEF and JETPLOW.
At the same time of hype however, those concerned with state spying are only confirming their previously unsure speculation. From reading a user’s monitor, to keyboard stroke detection, to hacking wireless LANs, your footsteps on the Internet are being constantly preserved and stored by the watchers: the NSA. In the end, as government spying grows, it’ll be left up to the market of hackers, computer gurus and other specialists to block, exploit and encrypt around the NSA’s prying eyes, which even now seems like a stretch.


http://benswann.com/...itors-and-more/


Edited by Zharkov, 15 January 2014 - 04:22 AM.

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#34 Zharkov

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Posted 16 January 2014 - 07:57 PM

NSA collects millions of text messages daily in 'untargeted' global sweep

The National Security Agency has collected almost 200 million text messages a day from across the globe, using them to extract data including location, contact networks and credit card details, according to top-secret documents.

The untargeted collection and storage of SMS messages – including their contacts – is revealed in a joint investigation between the Guardian and the UK’s Channel 4 News based on material provided by NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden.

The documents also reveal the UK spy agency GCHQ has made use of the NSA database to search the metadata of “untargeted and unwarranted” communications belonging to people in the UK.

The NSA program, codenamed Dishfire, collects “pretty much everything it can”, according to GCHQ documents, rather than merely storing the communications of existing surveillance targets.

The NSA has made extensive use of its vast text message database to extract information on people’s travel plans, contact books, financial transactions and more – including of individuals under no suspicion of illegal activity.

An agency presentation from 2011 – subtitled “SMS Text Messages: A Goldmine to Exploit” – reveals the program collected an average of 194 million text messages a day in April of that year. In addition to storing the messages themselves, a further program known as “Prefer” conducted automated analysis on the untargeted communications.

http://www.theguardi...ed-global-sweep


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#35 Zharkov

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Posted 26 January 2014 - 03:58 PM

The U.S. National Security Agency is involved in industrial espionage and will grab any intelligence it can get its hands on regardless of its value to national security, former NSA contractor Edward Snowden told a German TV network.

In text released ahead of a lengthy interview to be broadcast on Sunday, ARD TV quoted Snowden saying the NSA does not limit its espionage to issues of national security and he cited German engineering firm, Siemens as one target.

"If there's information at Siemens that's beneficial to U.S. national interests - even if it doesn't have anything to do with national security - then they'll take that information nevertheless," Snowden said, according to ARD, which recorded the interview in Russia where he has claimed asylum.

Snowden also told the German public broadcasting network he no longer has possession of any documents or information on NSA activities and has turned everything he had over to select journalists.

He said he did not have any control over the publication of the information, ARD said.

Questions about U.S. government spying on civilians and foreign officials burst into the open last June when Snowden, leaked documents outlining the widespread collection of telephone records and email.

The revelations shocked Germany, a country especially sensitive after the abuses by the Gestapo during the Nazi reign and the Stasi in Communist East Germany during the Cold War.

Reports the NSA monitored Chancellor Angela Merkel's mobile phone have added to the anger in Germany, which has been pushing for a 'no-spy' agreement with the United States, a country it considers to be among its closest allies.

Snowden's claim the NSA is engaged in industrial espionage follows a New York Times report earlier this month that the NSA put software in almost 100,000 computers around the world, allowing it to carry out surveillance on those devices and could provide a digital highway for cyberattacks.

The NSA planted most of the software after gaining access to computer networks, but has also used a secret technology that allows it entry even to computers not connected to the Internet, the newspaper said, citing U.S. officials, computer experts and documents leaked by Snowden.

The newspaper said the technology had been in use since at least 2008 and relied on a covert channel of radio waves transmitted from tiny circuit boards and USB cards secretly inserted in the computers.

Frequent targets of the program, code-named Quantum, included units of the Chinese military and industrial targets.

Snowden faces criminal charges after fleeing to Hong Kong and then Russia, where he was granted at least a year's asylum.

He was charged with theft of government property, unauthorized communication of national security information and giving classified intelligence data to an unauthorized person.

http://www.newsmax.c...01/26/id/549063


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#36 Zharkov

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Posted 26 January 2014 - 04:31 PM

Tor Developer Suspects NSA Interception of Amazon Purchase

Andrea Shepard, a Seattle-based core developer for the Tor Project, suspects her recently ordered keyboard may have been intercepted by the NSA.

Following the purchase of a new IBM Thinkpad Keyboard from Amazon.com, Shepard discovered her package to be taking a strange detour to the East Coast, revealed by a screenshot of her shipment tracking information.

Instead of shipping straight towards Seattle from the Amazon storage warehouse in Santa Ana, California, Shepard’s package made its way clear across the country to Dulles, Virginia. Jumping around an area deep inside what some privacy experts refer to as America’s “military and intelligence belt,” the package was finally delivered to its new endpoint in Alexandria.

While not uncommon to see packages sent to major shipping hubs in different areas of the country, the “out for delivery” and successful “delivered” statuses clearly indicate the item’s final destination was changed without Shepard’s approval, leading privacy experts to take notice.

“Could Amazon have made a mistake in notifying Shepard about this extra journey, which was likely meant to stay a secret?” PrivacySOS asks. “If this really is an example of the TAO laptop-interception program in action, does this mean that companies like Amazon are made aware of the government’s intention to “look after” consumer products ordered by their customers? Or did Shepard receive this weird notice only after some sort of glitch in the NSA’s surveillance matrix?”

According to recently revealed internal NSA documents, the agency’s Office of Tailored Access Operations group, or TAO, is responsible for intercepting shipping deliveries of high-interest targets.

“If a target person, agency or company orders a new computer or related accessories, for example, TAO can divert the shipping delivery to its own secret workshops,” Der Speigel noted last month. “At these so-called ‘load stations,’ agents carefully open the package in order to load malware onto the electronics, or even install hardware components that can provide backdoor access for the intelligence agencies.”

Given the NSA’s deep interest in Tor, a popular online anonymity tool, some speculate Shepard’s keyboard could likely have been implanted with a TAO bug known as “SURLYSPAWN,” a small keylogging chip often implanted in a keyboard’s cable. According to NSA slides, a bugged keyboard can be monitored even when a computer is offline.

“If it ever shows, I’ll be inspecting it as closely as I’m capable of,” Shepard said on Twitter.

Other leaked documents have revealed the NSA’s repeated attempts at identifying users of Tor, which according to the agency’s “Tor Stinks” presentation has only received minor success at best.

“We will never be able to de-anonymize all Tor users all the time,” the presentation states. “With manual analysis we can de-anonymize a very small fraction of Tor users.”

Whether Shepard’s incident is the result of a simple error by Amazon, an NSA interception, or an act of intimidation is still unclear. Given the government’s history of targeting Jacob Appelbaum, Tor’s main advocate, the idea of a top Tor developer being singled out for advanced NSA surveillance is far from unlikely.

http://www.infowars....mazon-purchase/


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#37 Zharkov

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Posted 26 January 2014 - 04:36 PM

Another possibility:    Government-financed companies to sell altered hardware and software directly to the public without telling them about backdoors, chip implants, micro transmitters, etc.     Microsoft, for example, has been reported to have placed NSA backdoors in all of its operating systems, at government insistance.    Browser encryption was long ago compromised by government decree.

 

The only privacy protection that remains is government incompetence.    They've got too much information to process it all.


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#38 Asterix

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Posted 27 January 2014 - 06:58 AM

Fight for the rights of NSA Employers

 

Because these brave men fight against intellectual anarchy !

Just listen for a second what this terrorist intellectual anarchist dare to say : no one should be society's sacrifice lamb


Edited by Asterix, 27 January 2014 - 07:06 AM.

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#39 Asterix

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Posted 27 January 2014 - 07:25 AM

More Intelelctual Anarchy at Work !

Help your NSA Local Hero to combat all this mess !

 


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#40 Asterix

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Posted 27 January 2014 - 07:49 AM

The BUSH CIA Headquarters

 

The Bush Family who sent 316 millions americans to The Stone Age just because They Wanted a Big Share of The 300 Trillions USD Pie of Interplanetary Teleportation of Matter

These TRUE MEN are not intellectual anarchist


Edited by Asterix, 27 January 2014 - 07:53 AM.

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