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#381 USC

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Posted 29 March 2019 - 09:20 PM

https://russiainphoto.ru/


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#382 USC

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Posted 03 April 2019 - 06:51 PM

Afghanistan, 67-th GRU Brigade

 

56539169_2090989274524366_54522136136305


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#383 USC

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Posted 03 April 2019 - 07:24 PM

56373573_2090980851191875_47556467036447

 

APB pistol

 

apb-main.png

 

 

6p13_01.jpg

 

 

 

6p13_02.jpg

6p13_03.jpg

 

 

 

6p13_04.jpg

 

6p13_05.jpg

 

 

 

 


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#384 USC

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Posted 05 April 2019 - 01:29 AM

Soldat - Soldier

 


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#385 USC

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Posted 05 April 2019 - 01:16 PM

56180232_2091955394427754_83196178801948


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#386 USC

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Posted 05 April 2019 - 06:27 PM

5422532_original.jpg

 

5423161_original.jpg

 

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5424791_original.jpg

 

 

5424577_original.jpg

 

5423461_original.jpg

 

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#387 USC

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Posted 23 April 2019 - 09:42 AM

'Human excrement was piled up waist-high': Full horror of Stalingrad revealed for first time as interviews with Russian soldiers finally see the light of day
  • Stalingrad Protocols gathers interviews with hundreds of troops that Russia had suppressed after the Second World War as only heroism was lauded
  •  

By ALLAN HALL FOR MAILONLINE

PUBLISHED: 21:48 BST, 5 November 2012 UPDATED: 15:37 BST, 6 November 2012

A new book has finally laid bare the full horrors of the Battle Of Stalingrad in the words of ordinary Russian soldiers, whose memories were suppressed by the Soviet authorities for 70 years.

The Stalingrad Protocols gathers interviews with hundreds of veterans that Russia had deemed too graphic to publish after the Second World War because only heroism was lauded.

Historians believe the book, compiled by the German historian Jochen Hellbeck, will change the way the world views the six-month 1942-43 battle that cost over a million men their lives and forever destroyed Hitler's ambitions to colonise the Soviet Union.

Scroll down for video
 
article-2228373-06CBF210000005DC-427_634

Truth be told: A new book has finally laid bare the full horrors of the Battle Of Stalingrad in the words of ordinary Russian soldiers, whose memories were suppressed by the Soviet authorities for 70 years

 

 
article-2228373-0194C2310000044D-23_634x

Appalling casualties: German prisoners of war captured by the Russians march in a long line winding over a hill toward a prison camp near Stalingrad

Professor Hellbeck gained access to nearly 10,000 pages of documents in the history department archives at the Soviet Academy of Sciences.

He claims the interviews demolish the myth that the Red Army only fought out of fear and that over 13,000 soldiers were executed for cowardice - in fact, the real number was lower than 300.

And the book has graphic and illuminating details about the disintegration of the German 6th Army - the conquerors of Poland and France - at Stalingrad, some of whom were reduced to cannibalism in order to stay alive in the ruins of the city as the mercury plunged to -40c below.

The bloodiest battle in Second World War came to an end on January 31, 1943 when Field Marshall Friedrich Paulus surrendered, disobeying the orders of his Fuhrer to kill himself.

 

 

Lieutenant Colonel Leonid Vinokur was the first to catch sight of Paulus and his recollection is published for the first time in the book.

He said: 'Paulus lay on the bed when I entered. He lay there in his coat, with his cap on. He had two-week-old beard stubble and seemed to have lost all courage.'

His aide, Major Anatloy Zoldatov, recalled: 'The filth and human excrement and who knows what else was piled up waist-high. It stank beyond belief. There were two toilets and signs above them both that read: "No Russians allowed".'

'They could have easily shot themselves,' said Major General Ivan Burmakov. 'But Paulus and his staff chose not to do that. They had no intention of dying - they were such cowards. They didn't have the courage to die.'

 
article-2228373-15DD7250000005DC-981_634

Turning point: The six-month 1942-43 battle cost over a million men their lives and forever destroyed Hitler's ambitions to colonise the Soviet Union

 

 
article-2228373-15DD724B000005DC-996_634

Intense fighting: The bloodiest battle in Second World War came to an end on January 31, 1943 when Field Marshall Friedrich Paulus surrendered, disobeying the orders of his Fuhrer to kill himself

Hitler was obsessed with the city that bore the name of his Communist nemesis and wanted it taken at all costs. Equally, the Russians decided to hold it at all costs, and did so.

The battle for Stalingrad became a primitive slugging match in ruined houses, cellars and bunkers. 

Between half and a million Russian men lost their lives, and 150,000 Germans. Of the 110,000 Germans who surrendered, only 5,000 would survive Stalin's gulags to return to a defeated Germany.

The battle cost the German army a quarter of everything it possessed by way of material - guns, tanks and munitions. It was a defeat from which it never recovered and for days afterwards in Berlin all shops and restaurants were closed as a mark of respect.

The Stalingrad Protocols adds a human dimension to 'Private Ivan', who has for decades been portrayed in the West as a man who fought with a Communist gun at his back. While there were executions, they were far below Western estimates.

The papers show that many Russians fought with a fanatical fervour because of the Nazi atrocities they had seen on the road to Stalingrad.

'One sees the young girls, the children, who hang from the trees in the park,' said sniper Vasily Zaytsev, adding that 'this has a tremendous impact'.

Major Pyotr Zayonchovsky told of a position that the Germans had abandoned.

When he arrived there, he discovered the body of a dead comrade 'whose skin and fingernails on his right hand had been completely torn off. The eyes had been burnt out and he had a wound on his left temple made by a red-hot piece of iron. The right half of his face had been covered with a flammable liquid and ignited.'

 
article-2228373-15DD7258000005DC-993_634

Cost of Stalingrad: Between half and a million Russian men lost their lives, and 150,000 Germans also perished

 

 
article-2228373-15DD7260000005DC-898_634

Russian defence: Communist Party card-carrying soldiers were usually the first into battle to encourage the others

Major Zayonchovsky described the nature of 'the Germans' as follows: 'The robber mentality has become such second nature to them that they have to steal - whether they can use it or not.'

Political officers assigned to the Red Army boosted fighting morale by convincing the ordinary soldier that their's was a struggle for the civilians behind the lines who the Nazis wanted to enslave. 

Communist Party card-carrying soldiers were usually the first into battle to encourage the others.

Brigade Commissar Vasilyev said: 'It was viewed as a disgrace if a Communist was not the first to lead the solders into battle.'

At the front in Stalingrad, the number of card-carrying party members rose between August and October 1942 from 28,500 to 53,500. Political officers distributed fliers in the battle zone portraying the 'hero of the day', including large photos of the honored soldiers.

'At night,' said Lieutenant Colonel Yakov Dubrovsky, 'the fighters are more inclined to speak openly, and one can crawl inside their souls.'

article-2228373-15DD6CD1000005DC-807_306

The Stalingrad Protocols

Battalion Commissar Pyotr Molchanov said: 'A soldier is stuck in the trenches for an entire month. He doesn't see anyone aside from his neighbour, and suddenly the commissar approaches him, tells him something, says a friendly word to him, greets him. This is of enormous importance.'

But soldiers need material comforts too and the paperwork shows how the hard pressed infantrymen received chocolate and mandarins and games to play, such as draughts and dominoes.

'The aim was for the soldiers to no longer be driven by fear, but instead to use their political awareness to overcome their distress,' said the Professor Hellbeck.

'Consequently, the Communists saw it as a sign of weakness when captured German soldiers described themselves as apolitical. In their opinion, the true will to win could only be developed by those who believed they served a higher purpose.

'The Communists saw the Red Army as more politically and morally steadfast than the Wehrmacht.'

According to Captain Nikolay Aksyonov, one could feel 'how every soldier and every commander was itching to kill as many Germans as possible'.

The sniper Anatoly Chechov told of his despair when he shot his first German.

He said: 'I felt terrible. I had killed a human being. But then I thought of our people - and I started to mercilessly fire on them. I've become a barbaric person, I kill them. I hate them.'

When he was interviewed, he had already killed 40 Germans - most of them with a shot to the head.

Vasily Zaytsev, the Red Army's best sniper at Stalingrad, who was played in the Hollywood movie Enemy At The Gates by Jude Law, shot 242 Germans, but said after the battle was over: 'You often have to remember, and the memory has a powerful impact. Now, I have unsteady nerves and I'm constantly shaking.'

This did not fit in with Communist ideals of glory and so his comments were suppressed in the archives until accessed by Professor Hellbeck.

VIDEO: Excerpt from World At War episode on Stalingrad
 
Video playing bottom right...
Click here to expand to full page
 
 
 
Loaded: 0%
Progress: 0%
0:12
Pause
Unmute
 
Current Time0:12
/
Duration Time0:42
Fullscreen
 
 
 
 
ExpandClose

Click here for World At War DVD information 

 
Share or comment on this article:  'Human excrement was piled up waist-high': Full horror of Stalingrad revealed for first time as interviews with Russian soldiers finally see the light of day

 

 

https://www.dailymai...-light-day.html


Edited by USC, 23 April 2019 - 09:42 AM.

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#388 USC

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Posted 25 April 2019 - 11:57 PM

Picture made in 1985

 Ekaterina Filippovna Tonkikh and Yakov Frolovich Tonkikh
with a portrait of their son Alexey, who died on the outskirts of Berlin in April 1945.

GLORY TO THE HERO!

 

 

57602860_386640311935244_233127761226707


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#389 USC

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Posted 26 April 2019 - 07:26 AM

Soviet women, pilots. Crimea 1944.

 

58654684_218124129144886_420218358136097


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#390 wirehaired

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Posted 27 April 2019 - 10:09 PM

56373573_2090980851191875_47556467036447

 

APB pistol

 

apb-main.png

 

 

6p13_01.jpg

 

 

 

6p13_02.jpg

6p13_03.jpg

 

 

 

6p13_04.jpg

 

6p13_05.jpg

 

 

 

 

Is that pistol a 9mm?


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#391 USC

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Posted 27 April 2019 - 10:58 PM

9mm APB and 7,62mm PSS silent pistols


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#392 wirehaired

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Posted 28 April 2019 - 04:41 PM

 

'Human excrement was piled up waist-high': Full horror of Stalingrad revealed for first time as interviews with Russian soldiers finally see the light of day
  • Stalingrad Protocols gathers interviews with hundreds of troops that Russia had suppressed after the Second World War as only heroism was lauded
  •  

By ALLAN HALL FOR MAILONLINE

PUBLISHED: 21:48 BST, 5 November 2012 UPDATED: 15:37 BST, 6 November 2012

A new book has finally laid bare the full horrors of the Battle Of Stalingrad in the words of ordinary Russian soldiers, whose memories were suppressed by the Soviet authorities for 70 years.

The Stalingrad Protocols gathers interviews with hundreds of veterans that Russia had deemed too graphic to publish after the Second World War because only heroism was lauded.

Historians believe the book, compiled by the German historian Jochen Hellbeck, will change the way the world views the six-month 1942-43 battle that cost over a million men their lives and forever destroyed Hitler's ambitions to colonise the Soviet Union.

Scroll down for video
 
article-2228373-06CBF210000005DC-427_634

Truth be told: A new book has finally laid bare the full horrors of the Battle Of Stalingrad in the words of ordinary Russian soldiers, whose memories were suppressed by the Soviet authorities for 70 years

 

 
article-2228373-0194C2310000044D-23_634x

Appalling casualties: German prisoners of war captured by the Russians march in a long line winding over a hill toward a prison camp near Stalingrad

Professor Hellbeck gained access to nearly 10,000 pages of documents in the history department archives at the Soviet Academy of Sciences.

He claims the interviews demolish the myth that the Red Army only fought out of fear and that over 13,000 soldiers were executed for cowardice - in fact, the real number was lower than 300.

And the book has graphic and illuminating details about the disintegration of the German 6th Army - the conquerors of Poland and France - at Stalingrad, some of whom were reduced to cannibalism in order to stay alive in the ruins of the city as the mercury plunged to -40c below.

The bloodiest battle in Second World War came to an end on January 31, 1943 when Field Marshall Friedrich Paulus surrendered, disobeying the orders of his Fuhrer to kill himself.

 

 

Lieutenant Colonel Leonid Vinokur was the first to catch sight of Paulus and his recollection is published for the first time in the book.

He said: 'Paulus lay on the bed when I entered. He lay there in his coat, with his cap on. He had two-week-old beard stubble and seemed to have lost all courage.'

His aide, Major Anatloy Zoldatov, recalled: 'The filth and human excrement and who knows what else was piled up waist-high. It stank beyond belief. There were two toilets and signs above them both that read: "No Russians allowed".'

'They could have easily shot themselves,' said Major General Ivan Burmakov. 'But Paulus and his staff chose not to do that. They had no intention of dying - they were such cowards. They didn't have the courage to die.'

 
article-2228373-15DD7250000005DC-981_634

Turning point: The six-month 1942-43 battle cost over a million men their lives and forever destroyed Hitler's ambitions to colonise the Soviet Union

 

 
article-2228373-15DD724B000005DC-996_634

Intense fighting: The bloodiest battle in Second World War came to an end on January 31, 1943 when Field Marshall Friedrich Paulus surrendered, disobeying the orders of his Fuhrer to kill himself

Hitler was obsessed with the city that bore the name of his Communist nemesis and wanted it taken at all costs. Equally, the Russians decided to hold it at all costs, and did so.

The battle for Stalingrad became a primitive slugging match in ruined houses, cellars and bunkers. 

Between half and a million Russian men lost their lives, and 150,000 Germans. Of the 110,000 Germans who surrendered, only 5,000 would survive Stalin's gulags to return to a defeated Germany.

The battle cost the German army a quarter of everything it possessed by way of material - guns, tanks and munitions. It was a defeat from which it never recovered and for days afterwards in Berlin all shops and restaurants were closed as a mark of respect.

The Stalingrad Protocols adds a human dimension to 'Private Ivan', who has for decades been portrayed in the West as a man who fought with a Communist gun at his back. While there were executions, they were far below Western estimates.

The papers show that many Russians fought with a fanatical fervour because of the Nazi atrocities they had seen on the road to Stalingrad.

'One sees the young girls, the children, who hang from the trees in the park,' said sniper Vasily Zaytsev, adding that 'this has a tremendous impact'.

Major Pyotr Zayonchovsky told of a position that the Germans had abandoned.

When he arrived there, he discovered the body of a dead comrade 'whose skin and fingernails on his right hand had been completely torn off. The eyes had been burnt out and he had a wound on his left temple made by a red-hot piece of iron. The right half of his face had been covered with a flammable liquid and ignited.'

 
article-2228373-15DD7258000005DC-993_634

Cost of Stalingrad: Between half and a million Russian men lost their lives, and 150,000 Germans also perished

 

 
article-2228373-15DD7260000005DC-898_634

Russian defence: Communist Party card-carrying soldiers were usually the first into battle to encourage the others

Major Zayonchovsky described the nature of 'the Germans' as follows: 'The robber mentality has become such second nature to them that they have to steal - whether they can use it or not.'

Political officers assigned to the Red Army boosted fighting morale by convincing the ordinary soldier that their's was a struggle for the civilians behind the lines who the Nazis wanted to enslave. 

Communist Party card-carrying soldiers were usually the first into battle to encourage the others.

Brigade Commissar Vasilyev said: 'It was viewed as a disgrace if a Communist was not the first to lead the solders into battle.'

At the front in Stalingrad, the number of card-carrying party members rose between August and October 1942 from 28,500 to 53,500. Political officers distributed fliers in the battle zone portraying the 'hero of the day', including large photos of the honored soldiers.

'At night,' said Lieutenant Colonel Yakov Dubrovsky, 'the fighters are more inclined to speak openly, and one can crawl inside their souls.'

article-2228373-15DD6CD1000005DC-807_306

The Stalingrad Protocols

Battalion Commissar Pyotr Molchanov said: 'A soldier is stuck in the trenches for an entire month. He doesn't see anyone aside from his neighbour, and suddenly the commissar approaches him, tells him something, says a friendly word to him, greets him. This is of enormous importance.'

But soldiers need material comforts too and the paperwork shows how the hard pressed infantrymen received chocolate and mandarins and games to play, such as draughts and dominoes.

'The aim was for the soldiers to no longer be driven by fear, but instead to use their political awareness to overcome their distress,' said the Professor Hellbeck.

'Consequently, the Communists saw it as a sign of weakness when captured German soldiers described themselves as apolitical. In their opinion, the true will to win could only be developed by those who believed they served a higher purpose.

'The Communists saw the Red Army as more politically and morally steadfast than the Wehrmacht.'

According to Captain Nikolay Aksyonov, one could feel 'how every soldier and every commander was itching to kill as many Germans as possible'.

The sniper Anatoly Chechov told of his despair when he shot his first German.

He said: 'I felt terrible. I had killed a human being. But then I thought of our people - and I started to mercilessly fire on them. I've become a barbaric person, I kill them. I hate them.'

When he was interviewed, he had already killed 40 Germans - most of them with a shot to the head.

Vasily Zaytsev, the Red Army's best sniper at Stalingrad, who was played in the Hollywood movie Enemy At The Gates by Jude Law, shot 242 Germans, but said after the battle was over: 'You often have to remember, and the memory has a powerful impact. Now, I have unsteady nerves and I'm constantly shaking.'

This did not fit in with Communist ideals of glory and so his comments were suppressed in the archives until accessed by Professor Hellbeck.

VIDEO: Excerpt from World At War episode on Stalingrad
 
Video playing bottom right...
Click here to expand to full page
 
 
 
Loaded: 0%
Progress: 0%
0:12
Pause
Unmute
 
Current Time0:12
/
Duration Time0:42
Fullscreen
 
 
 
 
ExpandClose

Click here for World At War DVD information 

 
Share or comment on this article:  'Human excrement was piled up waist-high': Full horror of Stalingrad revealed for first time as interviews with Russian soldiers finally see the light of day

 

 

https://www.dailymai...-light-day.html

 

Great article,i believe that the battle against the Nazis was so monumental that any Man who refused to fight deserved to be shot,there was no middle way.


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#393 wirehaired

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Posted 28 April 2019 - 10:24 PM

56373573_2090980851191875_47556467036447

 

APB pistol

 

apb-main.png

 

 

6p13_01.jpg

 

 

 

6p13_02.jpg

6p13_03.jpg

 

 

 

6p13_04.jpg

 

6p13_05.jpg

 

 

 

 

Is that Pistol a 9mm?


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#394 wirehaired

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Posted 29 April 2019 - 08:56 AM

Sorry for the double post.


Edited by wirehaired, 28 June 2019 - 03:15 PM.

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#395 USC

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Posted 01 May 2019 - 12:57 AM

Women (I bet say Girls) the Saviors.

 

58772227_1289722874524450_63814448849302


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#396 wirehaired

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Posted 01 May 2019 - 10:10 PM

Picture made in 1985

 Ekaterina Filippovna Tonkikh and Yakov Frolovich Tonkikh
with a portrait of their son Alexey, who died on the outskirts of Berlin in April 1945.

GLORY TO THE HERO!

 

 

57602860_386640311935244_233127761226707

So near the end of the War,terrible,next Month I go to Normandy for 75th commemorations,a Cousin of my Mothers was killed there in fighting near Caen,just two weeks after landing on the 6th June 1944,he was 18 years old,there is a new monument to all the British soldiers who fell in Normandy with their names,i will try and find his name.

                                 Thanks for the very interesting post and images.


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#397 USC

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Posted 02 May 2019 - 06:25 AM

Wish you luck.


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#398 USC

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Posted 10 May 2019 - 12:11 AM

9 of May - VICTORY DAY!

 

My first PORSCHE car!

 

Model: Elefant, 8,8 cm StuK 43 Sfl L/71 Panzerjäger Tiger (P), Sturmkanone mit 8,8 cm StuK 43, Sd.Kfz.184

 

60131113_2345859208983010_39304741791654


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#399 USC

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Posted 14 May 2019 - 07:30 PM

"Immortal Regiment" in Vladivostok. Citizens of the People's Republic of China marched in the ranks of the Regiment with portraits of their relatives who fought in the ranks of the Red Army and also participated in the liberation of Manchuria from the Japanese invaders.

 

60230516_616863568783450_381129922193234


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#400 USC

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Posted 28 June 2019 - 01:35 PM

R.I.P. Hero of The Soviet Union.

 

Ekaterina Illarionovna Mikhailova-Demina (22 December 1925 – 24 June 2019) was a Russian military doctor who was the only woman to have served in front-line reconnaissance in the Soviet marines during World War II.

 

 

 

 
    • img10.jpg

65289989_649680605442742_188359143847047

 

65421030_649680198776116_353053535436695

 

65307089_649680275442775_801881796012880

 

65770212_649680335442769_513570228658398


Edited by USC, 28 June 2019 - 01:37 PM.

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