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An overture of good will.


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#1 Vanka Savolov

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Posted 02 October 2017 - 06:14 PM

The intent of this topic is to present the many findings of asymmetrical electrical systems as I have discovered such through my own research.

I have been inspired by the works of Nikola Tesla, Thomas E. Bearden, John Bedini  and Wesley Gary, to name a few. 

 

Much of Tesla's and Bearden's works have been suppressed, where Bedini's works seem to be not much of a threat to TPTB and much of his works can still be found on the internet: https://search.yahoo...a&hsimp=yhs-005

 

Wesley Gary's works can be found here; in a Canadian patent: http://www.rexresear.../gary/gary1.htm

 

Tesla taught the principles of "shuttling energy in a circuit" which I have explored to its fullest and intend to present proof of this as well as some theory of, as yet untested, but based in understood/sound principles of existing technologies. I plan to also present a simplified version of Bearden's "Motionless Electromagnetic Generator" (MEG) which again is just theory on my part.

 

Are the Russians already aware of these technologies? I suspect that such is the case but I'm not absolutely sure of it, therefore I enter the following into the Public Domain as Open Source information for anyone to experiment with, in any way they may choose to do so. Discoveries of any sort should be given freely for all to contemplate and improve upon... where monopolies of such should be frowned upon.

 

In its most simplified form, asymmetrical circuits are 'open circuits' that allow for the escape of the back-flow of electromotive motive forces where symmetrical circuits do not allow for such back-flows. There are some very interesting characteristics found in asymmetrical circuits in that they run at ambient temperatures, and are highly efficient in their energy usage and demonstrate a high torque for their weight and size. The best application for this would be electric aircraft And that's where I'll start as my good will effort to Russia, because I know they are working on electric aircraft and may find this technology of benefit to their cause.

 

These motor designs, without any theory attached, prove to be very efficient, and seemingly more so when said theory is considered.

 

I need to revise some drawings and charts that support my claims here and I invite any comments that lend support and I ask that there are no negative comments made unless an effort was made to test and prove or disprove these systems... until then...

 

Cheers!

 

Edit: missing word: 'are' added after 'they' as in ...know they are working...

There are other mistakes to be edited, I'm sure... for such is my life, in constant need of editing. :D


Edited by Vanka Savolov, 02 October 2017 - 08:35 PM.

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#2 Vanka Savolov

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Posted 02 October 2017 - 10:07 PM

I found three drawings that will work well enough for illustrating these devices. This first one shows a simple voltage regulator circuit used to charge the battery of its twin circuit. This schematic shows brushes (8) where a recommended magnetic switch would otherwise be used.

The 'back-EMF' capture circuit is the full-wave bridge diode configuration which connects across the brushes (8) or alternate switch.

regulator2_zpsyptenpnf.jpg

 

The next drawing show a 'split-phase' two pole rotor and the magnetic switch is indicated as depiction 4, which is a lever switch with a magnet at one end of the lever. The same (B-EMF) full-wave rectifier circuit is shown across the contacts of the switch. Two of these configured together will yield a single phase motor... what I will propose here is a four-phase motor suited for aircraft. I have a chart (in need of revising) that shows all the electromagnetic forces being applied to the output shaft in a single rotation. This chart clearly indicates that this motor design is over-phased... something akin to a turbo-charged engine... but all electric.

 

two-pole_zpsqyfgxo7a.jpg

This next picture is a simplified version of the MEG compared to its original version. Inset into this drawing is a discovery I call the 'like-pole-effect' which has some unique properties about it.

 

MEG%20variation_zps78s7oqx5.jpg

 

This is all just for starters as I had worked out some 100 pages of similar information at another website... which I later removed due to a serious need of editing... I'm hoping to do better with this presentation.


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#3 Vanka Savolov

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Posted 03 October 2017 - 01:55 AM

Here's a stab at articulating the rotor design, sans pictures.

 

The intent is to drive two propellers in a contra-rotating fashion. I'm working with a 5 inch (12.7 cm) diameter rotor where the shaft itself is a three inch (7.63 cm) diameter pipe and where 16 2"x1"x1" neodymium super-magnets are placed in pairs lengthwise along the pipe, north pole facing up on the top side/end (top-dead-center or the zero degree position) and the south pole facing down on the bottom side, on the same end. Each pair is offset by 45 degree increments for a total of 8 such pairs situated in like fashion--where the last pair is set 45 degrees to the left of top-dead-center--on the opposite end of this shaft. Magnet pair = MP and so MP1 @ 0 degrees, MP2 @ 45, MP3 @ 90, MP4 @ 135, MP5 @ 180, MP6 @ 225, MP7 @ 270 and MP8 @ 315 degrees.

 

Situating the magnets on a long shaft in this fashion allows for the switches to be placed inline with each other where said switches will initiate in sequence as the rotor rotates, energizing their respective stator coils. 

 

The three inch pipe is sized for tapered-roller bearings and inter-related shaft and tube for the contra-rotating propeller mechanism. Inside of this rotor shaft is a 2" tube that is fixed to the motor's frame, and at the propeller end of this tube is a pinion gear set. This tube does not rotate. The inner most shaft spins freely in relation to the pinion gears causing it to counter rotate. The rotor itself drives the aft propeller, which drives the pinion gears which, in turn, drives the forward propeller.

 

Each propeller will have an inset ring-gear where the forward propeller's ring gear is set aft and the aft propeller's ring-gear is set forward and where the pinion gears are set between these two ring-gears. Picture the aft propeller attached to the rotor shaft where it has no choice but to spin with said shaft. This propeller's ring-gear meshes with the  pinion gear arrangement on the fixed tube and where the shaft that bears the forward propeller, spins freely within the fixed tube, as its ring-gear meshes also with said pinion-gears.

 

Back to the rotor aspect of this motor. Each magnet pair forms a two pole rotor section where there are eight two pole rotors offset on the same shaft and where each two pole section acts independently with its corresponding stator coils and switch. In this fashion each two pole rotor section fires at one half of a phase (split-phase) for a total of 4 phases over 8 two pole sections. The switches and related electronics (voltage regulator) can be designed as modules that literally pop-out from their snap-in positions, allowing for "on the fly" repairs should any one of these modules fail.  Since the switches are inline, this motor can be mounted in a way where the switch side of it is facing inward toward the cabin space, where there is ample access to said modules. A special pole mechanism can be designed to reach and attach to these modules for easy removal and replacement.

 

The length of this motor, minus the propellers, is approximately 24" to 30" and its height is about 6" and where its width is about 8'. A 6" height allows for insertion into a plane's wing without any protrusions, leaving the wing uniform in thickness.


Edited by Vanka Savolov, 04 October 2017 - 06:04 PM.

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#4 Vanka Savolov

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Posted 03 October 2017 - 05:55 PM

In this post I plan to go in depth regarding the electrical/electronic side to this motor. Note: I'll be using ohms instead of Henrys to simplify this presentation. If you like complicated things, visit these websites...

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inductor#Reactance and...

 

https://www.convertunits.com/from/henry/ohm/to/second and...

 

https://sciencing.co...or-7519932.html

 

If you simply take an ohm meter and measure the ohms in a coil, the meter will give you an accurate reading, in ohms... this reading is of a 'dry coil' meaning that there are no other forces applied, neither magnetically induced or energetically charged.

 

As indicated, there are 16 stator coils which are actually paired in sets, which are wound using 20 AWG magnetic wire, and where a single coil is 5 ohms for a total of 10 ohms per set, . In addition to these stator coils are the generating coils of which there is only one generator coil per rotor section. The wire gauge these coils are wound with is yet to be determined, but it's safe enough to assume that a 20 AWG will work. Since these generator coils are intended to make up for energy losses in these circuits, what ohms they will be rated at is yet to be determined as well, because the components used in these circuits will have their own rate of loss, depending on the quality of the materials used to manufacture them and the precision/tolerances they were designed to work within.

 

In this example a 60 Vdc pulse is applied to each coil set, via the closed contacts of its respective magnetic lever switch. The rotor magnets used are rated as having 145 pounds of pulling force. Anyone with the knowledge of electromagnetic forces applied to static magnetic fields could readily calculate the forces being applied to each rotor section. I'm not interested in getting that technical because it does what it does, without all the technical aspects thereof coming in to play.

 

When said lever switch's contacts open, the energy within these stator coils will flow back out, where it can be captured using a simple diode arrangement and an electrolytic capacitor. This diode arrangement is called a full-wave bridge rectifier, which takes this back-flow of energy and rectifies it into a series of  positive sinusoidal waves forms.

 

Using 60 Vdc as a source voltage, dictates the ratings of whatever components that will be used in designing the regulator circuitry, however, this back-flow of energy is in series with its source and so the energy in terms of voltage will be twice that of the source voltage. Therefore the voltage rating of the rectifier and said capacitor must be at least twice that of the source voltage. The output of the regulating circuit is, of course design to match a charge voltage, meant to be fed back to said battery.

 

The schematic presented in an earlier post does not show a revised theory of circuit design, where only one battery is needed to get the whole reaction started and where high capacity electrolytic capacitors are used in place of the batteries. The forward most circuit is charged using a single voltage source and the rest of these duplicate circuits are charged with its own generator coil and said back-flow.

 

For faster charging of all these circuits, a simple rotary switching mechanism is used to independently charge each circuit in sequence until the whole reaction sustains itself.

 

The only problem with the simplest configuration of this device is the burning and pitting of the switch contacts which can be kept to a minimum with proper capacitor spark suppression, which the BEMF capture circuit does well enough. However, if a semiconductor, like a MOSFET is used to drive these stator coils, then the current that drives such a device is at an absolute minimum and so the switch contacts will show very little, if any wear due to burning/pitting.

 

The use of a MOSFET coupled with a BEMF capture circuit is yet untried but I can't see any reason as to why it shouldn't work and work well. I'll soon present some drawings of this circuit design for all to consider.

 

 


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#5 Vanka Savolov

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Posted 03 October 2017 - 07:33 PM

Circuit #1 was designed for another device requiring a fixed pulse rate, so the PWM driver circuitry can be largely ignored. What needs to be noted in that circuit is Q3 the n-channel MOSFET which when compared to circuit #2 the relationship of a switch placement instead of driver circuitry can be realized. In #1, there is a green out line of a regulating and BEMF circuit combined and with a switch in place of the whole driver circuit, a clear picture of how a MOSFET can be used to fire the stator coils. I'm going to leave that PWM driver circuit as it is for later reference regards the MEG variant. It is possible to use a 'hall effect' transistor in place of a switch... (see text below this drawing)

n-chnl-mosfet%20circuits_zpss9l6xvrf.jpg

Diagram #3 shows how an hall effect circuit can be applied in its simplest form, and #4 indicates a more complicated circuit. If a MOSFET is used and the BEMF capture circuit works as expected, then there's no reason as to why a hall effect circuit cannot be added to replace any physically moving part of this circuit, e.g. the magnetic lever switch. An absolute solid state and if it works, it works. Note: all of these circuits are symmetrical circuits and so there will be energy losses that may prove to be unacceptable, because the whole idea of using asymmetrical circuitry is because all energy losses are kept to a minimum.


Edited by Vanka Savolov, 04 October 2017 - 10:34 PM.

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#6 Vanka Savolov

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Posted 03 October 2017 - 10:32 PM

This aircraft motor with all of its components requires some framework to position and hold in place said components... of which I choose to articulate, for now, the design thereof.

 

But first, there's a little matter of the bearings becoming magnetized which leads one to believe that a bearing is worn out. What is actually happening is these bearings, once magnetized, will attract and repel the surface from which they were magnetized, when the rotor is rotating.

This happens when a steel shaft is used and where, if a stainless-steel shaft is used, these bearings cannot become magnetized.

 

The framework: this framework must hold the stator coils, generator coils and include a snap-in receptacle for the circuit modules. Incorporated at both ends of this framework are the mounting brackets and cradles for the rotor's bearing assemblies. These cradles have a mating top section that is machined to hold the roller-bearing's race. Done this way, one can unbolt these top sections and remove the entire rotor, without having to disassemble the whole mechanism to service all components on the underside of this motor.

 

I would suggest halving this framework to allow for easy access to the rotor, where each half can be fasten together with bolts or where many recesses are formed in which stiff spring-clips can be inserted to hold these two halves together. It would also be possible to band these halves together using something similar to the locking bands for 55 gallon barrel lids.

 

The stator coils will work best if press-shaped and then dipped in a resin within a vacuum chamber. The tighter these coils are, the better they can focus their energy to do the work they were designed for. 

 

The generator coils are placed last, over the stator coils in a way that sets the lengthwise section across that open space of the rotor coils. The rotor magnets spin nearly through the stator coil's open ends, facing open-air, which is now occupied by the generator coils at both sides of these stator coil's openings. (the drawings show this clear enough) If these generator coils are wound flat, they then can be pressed into shape so that they fit as snug as possible. Dipping these coils is recommend also. It would be possible to use Velcro strips to hold said coils in place... which makes for easy removal. Generator coils should be placed opposite the module's location. If one were to look at and end of one of these coils, it would look like a 'U' and any side view would look like a wide 'U'.


Edited by Vanka Savolov, 04 October 2017 - 10:33 PM.

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#7 Vanka Savolov

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Posted 04 October 2017 - 05:08 PM

Today I'm presenting a chart of the firing sequence of the switches in relation to the rotor position. Since the switches are inline, and the rotor magnets are offset on their shaft, the respective stator coils do not fire at the same location of their switches. There is an abbreviated legend in the far right-hand section of this chart that indicates the inter-relation of the rotor position, switch and which stator coils is 'on' during one complete rotation of the rotor. You will notice that switch 1 (SW-1) energizes stator coil 8 (SC-8) when the rotor is in its 'H' position (RP-H). 

 

graph8x8_zpsfssijcvi.jpg

 

It would be possible to arrange the rotor magnets in a way so as to sync each switch with its respective stator coil and rotor position. But, arranging all that in that manner will place the switches in a pattern that is not inline to each other, and so, such an arrangement does not allow for easy maintenance if an individual circuit module should fail. I've chosen to split up the entire on-cycle of each coil in to three parts: start, midway and end, so that the overlapping on-cycles can be viewed more readily in relation to the other coil's on-cycles.

 

At no time is there a break in applied electromagnetic forces to this rotor. In fact, there are three coils on, in varying stages of their cycle, at all times. You'll also notice that each stator coil's off-cycle is much longer than its on-cycle. If you've carefully studied what I've presented here, you'll conclude as to why such a long off-cycle is beneficial in this particular asymmetrical system.


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#8 Vanka Savolov

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Posted 04 October 2017 - 05:57 PM

I am the author and editor of this thread and as editor I need to point out some discrepancies made in earlier posts.

 

In post #3--when speaking of the rotor magnet placements, I've indicated that the magnets are "off-set inline". These magnets are either off-set or inline and cannot be both at the same time, and so I've made the correction by removing all 'inline' references. (Color me distracted or just stupid... it's your call) ;)

 

Also, in the third drawing in post #2 I had stated "amphorus metal core" the correct word here should be: amorphous

 

amorphous: 2) having no real or apparent crystalline form; an amorphous mineral

 

These types of editor notes will most likely turn up from time to time, so you'll just have to bear with me... or not, it's your choice. Referring to a comment I had made in post #1:

"I ask that there are no negative comments made unless an effort was made to test and prove or disprove these systems. "Constructive criticism" is not the same as "negative comments"... and so, all constructive criticisms are welcome!

 

Edit: having to edit, editor's notes is par for the course for me.


Edited by Vanka Savolov, 04 October 2017 - 06:49 PM.

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#9 Vanka Savolov

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Posted 04 October 2017 - 06:19 PM

Comments, regards reality...

 

It would be so much easier to build one of these asymmetrical aircraft motors and just ship it to any interested parties... but since the lack of funding prohibits such, what you see here is the best I can do. I am confident that this motor will work and work well as I have conceived of it. There are a few details that are a bit foggy in my mind but I've allowed for many alternate designs to come into play should an idea prove to not work out so well in reality... hence the fact that it would be much easier to just build one of these motors. 


Edited by Vanka Savolov, 04 October 2017 - 06:26 PM.

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#10 Vanka Savolov

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Posted 04 October 2017 - 09:06 PM

A logical question to ask would be: "how do you control the speed of this motor?" To which I reply: with a fiber-optic/CdS control circuit incorporated into the system's circuits. Each module will have a CdS cell integrated where applicable. A location for each individual strand is fixed on the framework near the mudule's location so that the CdS cell remains on the module but is influenced by the light output of the fiber-optic strand that is intended for that circuit... which in this case, can be any one of these strands. The LED in this drawing is inserted into the coupling where it can flood the fiber-optic strands at the coupling's end. At the other end of the fiber-optic cable, the strands are freed up so as to locate them in proximity to their respective CdS cells. When the LED illuminates its end of said cable, light will travel through each strand within said cable to illuminate the CdS cells equally, thus regulating the motor's speed.

 

Using a fiber-optic cable in this manner will allow for the speed control device to be located in the pilot's cabin (cockpit).

 

Photo transistors would work just as well, but with the regulator circuit I've shown here, these CdS cell could take the place of the potentiometer that adjusts its voltage... requiring very little modification of the overall circuit design.

fiber-optic_zps7slyuhn7.png


Edited by Vanka Savolov, 04 October 2017 - 10:28 PM.

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#11 Vanka Savolov

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Posted 06 October 2017 - 02:20 PM

More thoughts on the contra-rotating mechanism.

 

The tube on which the pinion gears are mounted requires that spleen grooves are machined into its end so as to allow for the pinion gears' frame to slide, forward and back enough where shim spacers are used to permit proper spacing to insure that the ring/pinion gears will never bind. If this isn't done correctly, and these gears mesh too tightly, there will be excessive friction and thus undue wear.

 

This gear assembly would work best if there were a seal placed between these two propellers so as to allow for said gears to be oil lubricated. Perhaps a Teflon seal or some other material that offers the least friction will seal enough for an adequate oil reservoir. The tapered-roller bearings are grease lubricated and perhaps the  same method of lubrication can be used on the ring/pinion gears? If grease lubricated, only a dust seal would be necessary, which causes little, if any friction. The main advantage of using spleens in this manner, is to allow for the removal of aft propeller by simply sliding off the pinion gear rack/hub.

 

As stated earlier, the forward propeller's shaft is fed through the tube where a nut is used to properly load the tapered-roller bearings. In effect, both propellers use tapered-roller bearing that are properly seated in their races with their respective nuts at the backside of this motor. There could be a forward nut on the shaft that's through the face of the forward propeller for any adjustments and removal.

 

I plan to work up a drawing that depicts a reasonable configuration of the modules, their placement and the fiber-optic/CdS arrangement and also a modified version of the regulator circuit that includes the CdS cells.

 

I chose the wrong regulator circuit to present here... get ready for a 'flub' of a design drawing just for the fun/amusement of it, but however, this flub includes the rotary switch and its intended connections, so it's not a complete loss ... then I'll include the correct circuit to demonstrate the right (and wrong) way of designing these kind of things. (had you noticed that I'm the Pablo Picasso of illustrations?)


Edited by Vanka Savolov, 06 October 2017 - 02:39 PM.

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#12 Vanka Savolov

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Posted 06 October 2017 - 04:08 PM

If you like ultra complicated things... this circuit/configuration is for you. I was determined to use this voltage regulator circuit because I had indicated that it could be modified by replacing the potentiometer with a CdS cell, only to discover that the potentiometer is configured to act as a resistance differential in this circuit. At this point I had forgotten about another circuit I had contemplated that uses fewer components of which I had yet to incorporate the BEMF and generator circuits. This circuit may actually work but the need of two CdS cells per module and the need to double the use of fiber-optics to achieve the same effect as the potentiometer, makes for a way too complicated design. I've included 'charge diodes' in this circuit--so that's another thing to look for and also, this drawing shows the basic layout of the inline switch/circuit modules. There may be no need to "cross charge", as I've indicated in a previous drawing, and so I've sent the voltage back to the running capacitor within the same circuit.

 

Concerning the fiber-optic strand color coding: the dark blue strands indicate a low intensity light carried through them, where the light blue indicates higher intensity light. This differential in light intensity should produce the same effect as its potentiometer counterpart. In the upper right-hand corner is an LED circuit that should vary the light intensity of each LED as necessary for this type of circuit application.

modified%20CdS_zps8cateyx2.png

The two hubs of the rotary switch are connected together mechanically so that they rotate each armature contact in respects to their polarity and position on the contact hubs. If this rotary switch is coupled with a small servo-motor a predetermined pulsed rate of charge will energize the running capacitors independently from a single source voltage... in this case, a bank of batteries, which could easily be light weight lithium-ion cells, configured to whatever voltage you want.  16 3.7 volt cells would yield 60 volts and weigh about 2 pounds (1 Kg). Any one of these modules could charge this battery if the rotary switch is stopped at a mating contact position. Note: a fast pulse charge via a rotary switch, such as this one, will limit the in-rush of current to the running capacitors--which allows for 'charge-ramping' without any excessive current draw that may trip a circuit breaker, which is a component missing from these drawings. I had one split phase motor running on capacitors only, that needed an intermittent  pulse from a battery, whose duration was about one second, at three to four second intervals

 

Is it a mystery that the battery could be easily charged with a simple solar panel array? (didn't think so)

 

The next post is of an integrated circuit (IC) design that is no where near as complicated as this one... but I haven't detailed it as much as I have this one, and so, you'll just have to replace the old circuit with this new one. At some point in time I will present all the particulars of this design, when I feel certain that I've got it all straight in my mind.


Edited by Vanka Savolov, 06 October 2017 - 05:02 PM.

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#13 Vanka Savolov

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Posted 06 October 2017 - 05:50 PM

This next circuit was found on the internet (a good source of ideas) and was drawn using a double width line, so I just modified it using same. The LM 317 chip is designed for 12Vdc, but can be purchased for whatever voltage rating desired. Unlike the previous drawing, I've included the generator coil/circuit. You'll notice that this LM package requires few external components, one of which was a poteniometer that doesn't act as a resistance differential, it's just a straight forward variable resistor. Therefore, since that is all a single CdS cell is/does, this circuit works much better and simpler for the application at hand. (This drawing is updated to include every thing pertinent to this application, except a circuit breaker and the rotary switch connections.)

 

C2 and C3 in the legend are contra-indicated as C3 is the 'BEMF capacitor' and C2 is the 'run capacitor'. When I present a finely detailed diagram, I'm hoping to omit these kind of errors... with any luck.

altregulator_zpsu1palnvu.png?t=150722888

The CdS cell in this case requires only a single fiber-optic cable of eight strands to vary the speed of the motor it is designed for. Picture in your mind, eight of these circuits in the place of the eight in the previous drawing and you'll have a good idea as to what can be done to create a viable, efficient aircraft motor.

 

This is, thus far, just the basics of the overall design where a finely detailed depiction will require much contemplation and effort to illustrate... and I'm up to the task..., and you, if you so choose, can follow the progression thereof as it flows from my mind to digital format, and then to you all.

 

Note: I'm presenting this to anyone interested, while assuming that some out there may not have much of an understanding of these things... so if you feel like I'm treating you as if you know nothing, rest assured that such is not the case. If I wrote this presentation with all the technological jargon included, I may lose some rather bright minds whom might otherwise have something to contribute.

 

In my haste to get this posted, I forgot to correctly place the D1 & D2 markers... which are the two arrow/line symbols placed far right and extending beyond the rest of the diagram.


Edited by Vanka Savolov, 06 October 2017 - 11:39 PM.

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#14 Vanka Savolov

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Posted 06 October 2017 - 07:48 PM

There are many variants that can apply to this whole design: for instance, the magnet switch could be placed to fire positive instead of negative; and instead of  firing on the push of the rotor magnets it may work just as well, or even better, if it fired on the pull of said magnets. It might not be necessary to include two charging diodes--but I have done so to prevent any unwanted currents from flowing back into the charge circuit and possibly disrupting or destroying its function. Better safe than sorry, citing Murphy's Law and O'Toole's corollary. ;)

 

The CdS cell would mount on edge, with its face toward the framework where the fiber-optic strand is located so as to couple the two, without touching. A simple rubber o-ring can be used to prevent any other light source from interfering with the CdS's function. Of course, the CdS cell will need to be encased in a light-tight manner, that allows for an o-ring to seal with the fiber-optic strand coupling mounted on the frame work.

 

Also, there is a wide variety of integrated circuits out, and some of which may be ready to go, right off the shelf, without the need to add any external components. I've seen packages that can carry twice the current at half the size of its predecessor. The contact material used in these magnetic switches is the same as that used in the old automotive ignition points... found under the distributor cap. Said material is well suited for rapid on-off cycling and with proper sealing, little to no carbon will build-up on said contacts. Any burn/pitting is already greatly reduced because the BEMF circuit behaves just like the condenser, normally used in the old-style automotive ignition systems.


Edited by Vanka Savolov, 06 October 2017 - 08:13 PM.

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#15 Vanka Savolov

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Posted 06 October 2017 - 08:53 PM

Some notes: In the electrical engineering trade, it is recommenced to not exceed 60Vdc, but in asymmetrical systems, the limit is set at 84 Vdc. 84 Vdc is the RMS value of 120 Vac, which is the common household current here in the states.120x.707=84 and 84 Vdc is the equivalent of 7 standard 12 volt automotive batteries connected in series  or 23 3.7 volt lithium-ion cells connected in series... weighing in at roughly 3 pounds (1.5 Kg) which is a far cry from its lead-acid counterpart at 350 pounds (159 Kg) in the deep cycle variety.

 

If this aircraft motor were designed around 84Vdc you'd need to up the ohms of the stator coil sets to 14 ohms. And of course, everything else will have to be adjusted accordingly.

 

Lets see 145 pounds of pulling forces times 2 = 290 pounds-pulling force (both ends of the rotor magnet comes in to play). 84 Vdc applied to 14 ohm coils sets applying their forces to 290 pound of pulling force... well, it equates to some 'big balls' in a manner of speaking... like after-burners on a jet engine.


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#16 Vanka Savolov

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Posted 07 October 2017 - 06:14 PM

Here is a revised block/schematic diagram of an asymmetrical system that includes every aspect of its intended design. The inset legend is component color-coded and all schematic symbols are defined within. The wiring for the rotary switch is red color-coded to indicate all positive connections and black for all negative connections and even though these wires cross each other, they do not connect. I found a circuit fault in the "flubbed" drawing and made the necessary corrections in this drawing. 'IC' means "integrated circuit". The magnet switch is fashioned to close (fire) on the 'pull' of the rotor magnet. (I'll work up a drawing detailing the switch design in a separate post.) The fiber-optic strands do not connect to anything except their respective couplings.

mogen-opt_zpsef6jmgqk.png?t=1507311188

The ultra-bright LED is shown decoupled from its coupling. Schematic symbols with a line and some other shape are usually polarity sensitive components and so, the line indicates its 'positive' lead/connection and where the other shape is its negative. There is a possibility that CdS cells are temperature sensitive and may function differently at different (extreme) temperatures. If such should be the case, then photo-transistors will need to be designed into these circuits, replacing the CdS cells.


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#17 Vanka Savolov

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Posted 07 October 2017 - 07:00 PM

When designing electrical things, these charts will come in handy for quick references. The colored wheel is a quick read (cheat-sheet) of all the formulas in ohm's law. The first page lists the various magnetic wire gauge sizes and their ohm's ratings at different temperatures in 1000 foot increments. 1 thousand feet of 20 AWG @ 68F = 10.15 ohms. The last page is a conversion cheat-sheet of fraction to decimal to millimeter measurements. What does the formula 'T=RC' relate to?... you'll find out because it relates to another motor design which will be presented at a later date... you know, sometime in the future. ;)

ohms%20per%20ft_zpsvlq6hofk.jpg


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#18 Vanka Savolov

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Posted 08 October 2017 - 12:40 AM

This post was removed because it was and edited post that somehow got double posted. The next post is the edited version.


Edited by Vanka Savolov, 09 October 2017 - 01:12 AM.

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#19 Vanka Savolov

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Posted 08 October 2017 - 12:59 AM

Here is a probable switch design that has a fixed gap between the contacts. The violet colored areas are made of insulator

material where such underneath the section depicting a square is intended to isolate, electrically, the upper contact from the lower one.

These contacts rotate tightly so as to effect new contact material until said material is used up. A spring loaded ball bearing

can be set dead center the armature mechanism to lock the indexing of these rotating contacts. On the extreme outer edge of

these contacts, there is to be enough of an indent to aid in index locking. Perhaps 12 indents to yield 12 indexing positions.

pull-switch_zpsy3vwnt5a.png

The violet section standing upright is intended to limit the gap's width and where the underside that comes in contact

with the armature is layered with a thin hard-rubber to dampen any noise. If the switch were in its proper position, it

would appear as depicted, with its contacts open. The little circle on the side of this switch is a stationary shaft on which

the armature pivots. Needle bearings placed between said shaft and the interior of the through hole the armature pivots

on, will allow for free movement, while providing ample surface area to conduct the current it is designed to switch.

And as an alliterative design, a small screw can be set in place to allow for custom gap settings which will allow this motor

to be 'tuned' for maximum efficiency.

 

Since the switch must be fixed located, the module it fits to will be shaped to locate the switch where in needs to be, where

the rest of the module will conform to the shape of the framework. A side-view of this module should resemble a 'J' shape,

with the switch located at or near the bottom-left-end of the 'J'. The blue/red area is the rotor magnet's north/south poles

positioned oriented to the generator coil.

 

Gap settings are voltage dictated. The lower the voltage the narrower the gap, and conversely, the higher the voltage the

wider the gap. For voltages above 36 Vdc, figure an approximate 2 thousandth of an inch per 6 volts where 84 volts would

require a gap setting of 28 thousandths. For voltages below 36 Vdc figure at 3.5 thousandths. These are minimum gap settings.

Coil ratings are set at 2 ohms per 12 volts and so an 84 volt system would require a stator coil rating of 14 ohms per set.

The generating coil must make up for electrical losses under maximum load, which means said coils will have a higher output

at lower RPMs... which is best for faster start-up.

 

Will this system generate too much energy, so much so, that said energy will need to be dissipated, in some manner or other?

I see, LED running and landing lights, configured to do any excess energy dissipating.


Edited by Vanka Savolov, 08 October 2017 - 01:13 AM.

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#20 Vanka Savolov

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Posted 08 October 2017 - 08:35 PM

"An excellent indicator of the worthiness of these systems would be if they should seek to suppress the information presented in this thread."

 

Some reasoning behind my initial theory regarding the back-flow of electromotive forces and how such could be "shuttled in a circuit":

 

Mentioned in another post were the automotive ignition systems for internal combustion engines, back in the day when points were used to energize the ignition coil. Today's method of doing same is all electronic, using light emitters, detectors and power transistors to energize the ignition coil.

 

The ignition points system uses a condenser (a type of capacitor) to arrest the spark when the points open--where said condenser absorbs the spark's energy and sends it directly to ground, dissipating it fully. Instead of sending that energy to ground, it is fully 'gated' into an electrolytic capacitor in a manner in which it cannot flow back to its source. In the plumbing trade, a check-valve works in a similar manner to that of a diode, in that the water can only flow in one direction. The diode configuration of a full-wave bridge rectifier works like multiple check-valves, in that it also takes the negative pressures (negative voltages/currents) and flips them to positive--while preventing it from ever returning to its source. (Any negative water pressure on a check-valve will cause it to remain closed, as it must have positive pressure in the flow direction the valve was designed for.) This checking and flipping is referred to as 'gating' when speaking in terms of electrical currents during energy transfers.

 

When said spark's energy is gated into an electrolytic capacitor, instead if dissipating it to ground, it will keep building up a charge until said capacitor's charge matches the source voltage. e.g. if the source voltage is 60Vdc, then the current will stop flowing into the capacitor when the charge applied to it reaches 60Vdc. When this happens, the spark's energy can no longer be absorbed and stored in the electrolytic capacitor, because it is full to capacity. In order to allow for continual spark absorption and storage, some of the energy in said capacitor must be used up (dissipated) to give it enough room for more energy to flow into it. Returning this stored energy back to its source is known as 'feedback'--which is a unique function asymmetrical systems can perform, with relative ease.  The circuit must open to allow for back-flow captures to effect, where said feedback benefits are then realized in its actual watt rating. The energy expended in an asymmetrical system of this design is about 1/9th of its symmetrical counterpart. When enough energy is added to these systems via a generator circuit--that 1/9th energy usage can be compensated for, making this motor 100% efficient in energy usage while the actual work being done remains the same, in terms of torque/horsepower. 

 

What of the horse power of this motor? To know exactly what its output is. it would need to be tested under load, with all the proper instrumentation. What I can figure, and this is, by no means, the actual... it's just some 'food for thought' more than anything else... and so...

 

When a 84Vdc source has a 14 ohm load applied to it, ohm's law says to figure its watt rating using this formula: P=V2/R where P indicates 'power' and V indicates 'voltage' and where R indicates 'resistance'. If 84=V and 14=R then V2/R= 504 watts or P=504. This is just one set of coils being charged with an 84Vdc source... and there are eight such coil sets in the system presented here. Therefore, 504x8=4032 watts potential. (Pt=V2/Rx8). What I can't say for sure is the power added due to the static energy of the permanent magnets in relation to the electromagnetic forces being applied to said magnets.

 

Think about that for awhile, then consider that this motor's RPMs is estimated to be around 6000+. The actual math and the methods used to determine such power ratings is not fully understood by me... so again, this for fun, a "best guess" based upon what ratings I can readily define... which is clearly not enough to be accurate.

 

The magnets used for this motor design can also be used in a wind-generator and when I find that information, I will post here the watt rating of a comparable generator, then add to that the potential watt rating shown above, for a watt sum to ponder, in an effort to get some picture of what this motor can actually do.

 

Editing to follow, I'm sure.  

 

Edit: could not find the actual wind-generator I thought these magnets were designed for, so due to the uncertainty of the true watt rating, without any reference links, I'll just remove all that applies to such claims.


Edited by Vanka Savolov, 08 October 2017 - 09:29 PM.

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