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Israel, Saudi Arabia Setting Preconditions For War With Hezbollah


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#1 Mario Milano

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Posted 15 November 2017 - 06:48 AM

Israel, Saudi Arabia Setting Preconditions For War With Hezbollah

 

November 14, 2017

 

https://southfront.o...with-hezbollah/

 

The crisis in the Middle East is developing further.

 

In Saudi Arabia, the purge continued. According to Middle East Eye, senior Saudi figures were tortured and beaten in the purge under the banner of an anti-corruption movement, conducted by current Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman

 

He has overseen arrests of hundreds of people, including senior royals, ministers and tycoons, with some of them reportedly being tortured so badly during their arrest or subsequent interrogations that they required hospital treatment. Even Prince Bandar bin Sultan — Saudi Arabia’s most famous arms dealer, longtime former ambassador to the US, and recent head of Saudi intelligence — was reported to be among those detained as part of the purge.

 

If confirmed, this will be the most significant and high profile case of this purge, even above that of high profile billionaire investor Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal, considering Bandar’s closeness to multiple US administrations.

 

This comes amidst rumors that King Salman was set to make his son king. Speculation peaked when Al-Arabiya tweeted, then quickly deleted, details of the allegedly imminent Mohammed bin Salman’s ascension ceremony. These rumors were not confirmed. However, Prince Mohammed already plays a key role in decision making at almost all levers of government.

 

The Crown Prince also accused Tehran of delivering missiles to Yemen’s Houthi forces for use against the kingdom that he described as “direct military aggression”.

 

The United States also chimed in and said “there have been Iranian markings on those missiles.”

 

The Arab League will hold an extraordinary meeting on November 18 at the request of Saudi Arabia to discuss “violations” committed by Iran in the region, with Saudi Arabia rumored to mobilize fighter jets.

 

Houthi forces have threatened to attack oil tankers and warships of Saudi Arabia and its coalition in response to the Saudi-led naval blockade of Yemen.

 

Ex-Lebanese Prime Minister Saad Hariri is still in Saudi Arabia, with his movements reportedly controlled by the Saudis.

 

An oil pipeline between Saudi Arabia and Bahrain exploded, with Bahrain accusing Iran of blowing it up. Israel is beyond itself with Iran and Hezbollah increasing their influence in the region and in Syria. The Israeli media claimed that the US and Russia have reached an agreement, which would push Iranian-backed forces from an area close to the Israeli-occupied Golan Heights.

 

However, this likely an example of wishful thinking. Iran is reportedly building a permanent military base in Syria. Israel’s Defense Minister Avigdor Lieberman said that Tel Aviv “will not allow the Shi‘ite axis to establish Syria as its forefront base” and threatened to bomb it. Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said Tel Aviv has informed Moscow and Washington that Israeli forces will continue to take action in Syria according to its interests despite any ceasefire established there.

 

Hezbollah leader Hassan Nasrallah accused Saudi Arabia of encouraging Israel to attack Hezbollah in Lebanon, and Secretary of Iran’s Expediency Council, Mohsen Rezaei, said that the US, Saudi Arabia, the UAE and Israel are planning a war against Lebanon.

 

Lacking a clear strategy for their involvement in the Middle East, Washington is forced to play second fiddle to its “allies”. Trump’s administration’s bold claims against the 2015 Iran nuclear accords and Iran in general only stir up the anti-Iranian block in the region.

 

The conflict is developing in its own way, with the conflicting sides immersed so deep that it proves more and more difficult for them to stop even if they wanted to. Now, the sides are finalizing the coalition, which may participate in the expected standoff and blame each other setting preconditions for a war.

 

http://thesaker.is/i...with-hezbollah/


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#2 Mario Milano

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Posted 15 November 2017 - 06:53 AM

Iran & Saudi Arabia saber-rattling: Who would prevail in all-out war?

 

Crunching numbers

 

Predicting the outcome of a potential war based on statistics alone is pointless. For instance, Israel’s conflict with Hezbollah in 2006 ended in a draw, despite the IDF being far better funded and equipped. Still, the figures give an idea of what Tehran and Riyadh may bring into play in case of an escalation.

 

The website Global Firepower Index, which tracks the relative strength of national militaries, closely ranks the two nations. Saudi Arabia is estimated to be the world’s 24th-strongest nation, compared to Iran (21st).

 

5a0af49cfc7e93692d8b4567.jpg

 

Iran is three times more populous than Saudi Arabia and is able to field over 39 million soldiers compared to Saudi Arabia’s 14 million. Its total military personnel is estimated at 934,000, or 3.6 times larger than its rival.

 

In terms of military budget, the situation is the opposite. Tehran spends $6.3 billion on defense each year, while Riyadh’s budget is $56 billion. The gap may appear more impressive than it really is, until you take into account that Saudi Arabia gets most of its weapons from the United States at steep prices, while Iran prides itself on manufacturing whatever it can domestically. Its successes in areas like rocketry are apparent.

 

5a0af48efc7e93762d8b4567.jpg

 

There is also the fact that different countries get different bang for their buck simply because goods and services have varying costs in each market. The website estimates Iran’s defense budget adjusted for purchasing power at $1.459 trillion, compared to Saudi Arabia’s at $1.731 trillion.

 

In terms of solid hardware, the Saudis beat Iran in the number of fighter jets and attack aircraft (177 and 245 vs. 137 and 137). Some of Iran’s planes are outdated American models left over from the times of the Shah, like the F-4 Phantom II, while others are Soviet and Chinese aircraft delivered from the late 1980s to early 1990s. The Royal Saudi Air Force is stacked with modern American, and some European, models. In case of war, Tehran hopes to shoot them down with surface-to-air missiles which it has been developing for years.

 

5a0af3b5fc7e93fa2c8b4567.jpg

 

The naval strength of the two nations arguably favors Iran. The vast difference in the number of ships (398 vs. 55) is mostly due to Iran’s mosquito fleet of 230 patrol boats, but the Persians also boast something that the Arabs do not: submarines. Iran has 33 of them, ranging in displacement from small 10-ton Al-Sabehat 15 SDVs, all the way up to its three Russian Kilo-class attack subs delivered in the 1990s.

 

If the US does not get involved (a big if), Iran may at the very least block all Saudi ships from sailing the Persian Gulf.

 

5a0af3c1fc7e93eb2c8b4567.jpg

 

When it comes to large-scale ground battles, Iran has hardware numbers more or less on its side. It lags behind Saudi Arabia in terms of infantry fighting vehicles, but beats it in strength of tank units and vastly outnumbers in all kinds of artillery. But again, Iran’s ability to capitalize on this advantage will depend on whether it can defend the sky.

 

Death & destruction

 

© Youssef Boudlal

 

The war that would transform oil markets

 

Of course, if Iran and Saudi Arabia do come to blows, it would take a heavy toll on both countries and the rest of the world. Unlike the sporadic launches from Yemen, Iran’s ballistic missiles are more than capable of overwhelming Saudi defenses. But they may not be precise enough to avoid hitting non-military targets. Saudi Arabia’s record of killing civilians in Yemen leaves little room for hope that it would be more careful in a fight against Iran.

 

A conflict involving two major crude oil producers would also send oil prices skyrocketing, especially since a big share of the trade relies on the route through the Persian Gulf. One can use the hike on the news of the Saudi royal purge as a kind of preview of what may happen.

 

And if the two nations do clash, other players are unlikely to just stand by. The usual proxy forces will be spun to action. A real mess with little gain can be predicted, which is why, hopefully, it will not happen.

 

Read more: https://www.veterans...in-all-out-war/


Edited by Mario Milano, 15 November 2017 - 06:54 AM.

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#3 Mario Milano

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Posted 15 November 2017 - 12:21 PM

This picture makes Khazar Jew rats shit themselves...

 

Jew pest exterminators....Hezbollah

 

07hezbollah.xlarge1.jpg


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#4 WATCHD0G

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Posted 15 November 2017 - 08:27 PM

Is this your entire life, "Mario"? Posting propaganda stories on social media? Are you a paid troll?


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#5 wirehaired

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Posted 15 November 2017 - 08:30 PM

The big fat Saudis are a joke,also Israel knows if they have another conflict with Hezbollah they will pay a very heavy price,in fact Hezbollah may even cross the border,the Israelis would just about have to destroy Lebanon to come out on top.although I wouldn't put it past them.


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#6 Mario Milano

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Posted 16 November 2017 - 12:55 AM

Is this your entire life, "Mario"? Posting propaganda stories on social media? Are you a paid troll?


Did the picture of Hezbollah make you crap your pants rabbi?

I warned you that it would have
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