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#41 grog

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Posted 05 January 2018 - 11:58 AM

"BETTER CLEAN AND FREE THAN DIRTY FOSSIL TRUMP"

 

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#42 grog

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Posted 05 January 2018 - 12:22 PM

Norway surpasses ambitious car CO2 goal, 3 years early
 
 
 
 
January 4, 2018
 
 
 
 
 
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Norway has long been way out in front of the electric car transition, not least because this oil state would rather like to export its oil-and hence provided very generous subsidies to reduce domestic consumption through electric vehicle adoption.
 
Yesterday brought not one, but two headline stories across my radar emphasizing just how far this little Nordic nation has come. Firstly, Electrek reports that plug-in vehicles accounted for 52% of Norwegian new car sales in December. Meanwhile, Cleantechnica reports that the country has reached its 2020 official goal-considered almost unreachable when announced- for passenger vehicle emissions of 85 grams of carbon dioxide per kilometer three years early!
 
It's worth noting, however, that headlines of Norway reaching "emissions goals from transportation" are a little misleading for a couple of reasons:
 
Firstly, the goal refers to emissions per passenger kilometer in new cars-that's not the same as the whole car fleet, and it's certainly not the same as the overall transportation sector. On the one hand, the many older gasoline cars still on the road-as well as the new gas cars being sold likely have much higher emissions than their official figures-suggest there's a long, long way to go before 85 grams becomes the norm across all cars in Norway. Secondly, and I hope Lloyd will buy me a pint for pointing this out, cars are (gasp!) not the only form of transportation.
 
No doubt, the astoundingly fast growth of electric vehicles in Norway has tended to hog the headlines. However, from massive investments in bike superhighways to Oslo excluding cars from the city center, there's actually good reason to hope that the EV transition is just the tip of a much greener, cooler (sorry!) iceberg. Heck, the country's capital even offers citizens $1,200 towards the purchase of an electric cargo bike!
 
Still, even the top-line numbers are encouraging news on this front. And given that diesel cars-once popular in Norway-are now in last place in terms of sales, we can hope that particulate emissions, smog and black carbon will be falling too.
 
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#43 grog

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Posted 05 January 2018 - 12:27 PM

"BETTER CLEAN AND FREE THAN DIRTY FOSSIL TRUMP"

 

 

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#44 grog

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Posted 05 January 2018 - 12:52 PM

Cleaning up our air
 
 
 
 
January 02, 2018
 
 
 
 
 
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Low-carbon solutions are possible BIGSTOCK
 
Now is the time to decarbonise the transport sector
 
During the Transport Thematic Day of the UN Climate Change Conference COP23, a new Transport Decarbonisation Alliance (TDA) commenced its journey to faster climate action on a global scale.
 
France, the Netherlands, Portugal, Costa Rica, and the Paris Process on Mobility and Climate (PPMC) launched this alliance to stimulate great political leadership in the climate sector.
 
This alliance holds the belief that transportation is responsible for large-scale anthropogenic CO2 emission amounting to 15% to 17% of the world's total CO2 emission. If proper action is not taken for immediate carbon reduction, transport-induced CO2 can grow from 6-7 gigatons to 16-18 gigatons by 2050.
 
Against such a backdrop, the implementation of Paris Climate Agreement has become a challenging and questionable issue. The leaders of the Transport Decarbonisation Alliance expect that coordinated and ambitious climate actions on transport should be taken urgently to deliver proper implementation of the agreement.
 
To make a systemic transformation in the transport sector, members of TDA are working diligently to strengthen the voice of countries, cities, and companies in their peer groups.
 
TDA is hoping to make decarbonisation possible in the transportation sector through establishing a forum where front-runners on transport and climate change meet and exchange good practices, as well as common challenges, in order to secure the transition to a net-zero emission sector by 2050.
 
The time is now
 
The Paris Agreement created the pathway for the efforts to reduce global carbon emissions. But the transport sector delegates believe that the national climate plans, which are widely known as nationally determined contributions (NDCs) created under the Paris Agreement, do not show enough concern in transportation to help the sector deliver its full potential into the agreement. So, TDA believes that now it is up to the transportation sector to set up a carbon-free mobility.
 
Transportation is responsible for large-scale anthropogenic CO2 emission amounting to 15% to 17% of world's total CO2 emission
 
However, COP23 has opened the door for six new voluntary sector initiatives to address specific aspects of transport and climate change. The sectors include: Eco Mobility Alliance, EV 100, below50, Walk 21, Global Strategy for Cleaner Fuels and Vehicles, and Urban Mobility Initiative.
 
The "below50" sector will work with the global market for the development of the world's most sustainable fuels. "Eco Mobility Alliance" creates a platform for cooperation within the ambitious cities committed to use sustainable transport.
 
"EV 100" aims to accelerate the transition to electro-mobility, while "Walk 21" sets its target for valuing and delivering more walkable communities.
 
"Global Strategy for Cleaner Fuels and Vehicles" will promote clean energy for the transportation sector, and "Urban Mobility Initiative" will accelerate implementation of sustainable urban transport development and mitigation of climate change.
 
This is not the first attempt by any alliance to decarbonise the transport sector. On May 2016, the International Transport Forum (ITF) has also launched a global decarbonising transport project for promoting carbon free transport - which was highly appreciated by United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC).
 
The objective of this project is to reduce transport CO2 without sacrificing access and opportunities offered by transport.
 
Recently, the International Organisation for Public Transport (UITP) has also highlighted the concern for faster climate action and made agreements on fostering sustainable urban mobility.
 
UITP has signed a Memorandum of Understanding with UNFCCC and the International Union of Railways (UIC) to promote sustainable public transport options, like the initiation of clean shuttle bus services, highlighting the benefits of investing in low-carbon solutions, and creating infrastructure for sustainable public transports.
 
It is great to see how the public transport sectors communicate with the parties to help the development and implementation of low-carbon solutions with quality public transport.
 
With these committed organisations promoting the development of sustainable transport, climate experts expect to see a balance between anthropogenic emission and removal of CO2 by the middle of this century.
 
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#45 grog

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Posted 05 January 2018 - 12:56 PM

"BETTER CLEAN AND FREE THAN DIRTY FOSSIL TRUMP"

 

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#46 Mario Milano

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Posted 05 January 2018 - 01:04 PM

It like Al Gore has become a member of Pravda forums
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#47 Mario Milano

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Posted 05 January 2018 - 02:15 PM

Poor Al Grog believng in stupid nonsense
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Your green energy may not be so green after all: rare earth elements used in solar panels and wind turbines are highly polluting

BY IWB · JANUARY 4, 2018

by: Ethan Huff

Image: Your green energy may not be so green after all: rare earth elements used in solar panels and wind turbines are highly polluting

(Natural News) Renewable energy is taking the world by storm, as greenies everywhere welcome with open arms the latest iterations of solar panels, wind turbines, and other clean energy alternatives to traditional fossil fuels like coal. But one of the things that many people who believe in green energy fail to realize is that many of their favorite technologies require the use of so-called rare earth minerals and other elements that involve dirty mining and slave-like labor conditions.

A bulk of the worlds rare earth elements (REEs) comes from two places: China and Africa. Chinese REEs account for 95 percent of the worlds supply, and reports indicatethat the situation isnt pretty. Not only is the extraction of these minerals the exact opposite of green and clean, but the folks tasked with performing the labor and those who end up encountering much of the polluting byproducts represent some of the worlds most vulnerable.

There are two general classifications for REEs: The light variety and the heavy variety. Both categories include elements that are used in things like energy-saving light bulbs, wind turbines, solar panels, hybrid vehicles and their various automotive catalysts, rechargeable batteries, defense technologies, and smartphones. And both varieties are said to take a heavy, and often highly toxic, toll on soils and the environment.

Energy-saving light bulbs are a toxic nightmare for people and the planet

Back in 2007 when then-presidential candidate Barack Obama promised to immediately sign a law that begins to phase out all incandescent light bulbs, greenies everywhere celebrated what they perceived as a major victory as Americans would soon be forced to reduce their carbon footprints. But it has since been revealed that these so-called energy-saving technologies are actually more polluting than their predecessors.

In order to manufacture those irritatingly harsh compact fluorescent bulbs that environmental extremists love to claim are better for the planet, several REEs not to mention toxic mercury are required. These include yttrium and europium, both of which have to be mined from deep within the earth. Since many of the mines that unearth it are located in China, where environmental regulations are slim to none, this translates into gobs of pollution that end up in lakes, streams, and waterways.

Like yttrium, europium is similarly destructive, not only to the earth but also to local towns and villages that end up getting dumped on when it comes to disposing of the many polluting waste byproducts that are leftover from processing. These include carcinogenic substances like sulphates, ammonia, and hydrochloric acid, all of which are used to separate the good parts of REEs from the bad parts.

Mining of neodymium and other rare earth minerals used in electric motors, wind turbines causing environmental pollution emergencies in China

For all the hype about how much better electric and hybrid vehicles are compared to the gas guzzlers that most of us drive, the fact remains that these environmentally friendly alternatives are loaded with REEs that reports indicate are causing unprecedented destruction throughout China where most of them are mined.

The Chinese government admits that the mining of REEs such as neodymium (used in electric motors, engines, headlight glass, and wind turbines for magnetic purposes), cerium (used in hybrid batteries and catalytic converters), terbium (used in engines and magnetic components), and lanthanum (used in fuel additives, fuel cells, and hybrid batteries) have created a scenario in which the country is now stricken with landslides, clogged rivers, environmental pollution emergencies and even major accidents and disasters.

Many of these same elements are also used in smartphones to make their circuit boards, vibrating devices, screens, glass, and even speakers. Many modern conveniences, in fact, contain one or more of the 17 elements considered to be rare earth, which are described by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) as being iron grey to silvery lustrous metals that are typically soft, malleable, and ductile; and usually reactive.

Rare earth mineral waste is so prolific that it even taints food crops

In saying that most of these metals currently come from China, it is more precise to say that most actually come from a specific region of China known as Baotou, a city in Chinas Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region that is home to roughly 2.5 million people. In Baotou, rare earth mining produces some 10 million tons of wastewater per year, which is pumped into nearby dams, which is where many locals get their drinking water.

In other areas where REEs are mined such as in Malaysia, reports have emerged suggesting that solid waste from REE mining is ending up not only in water supplies but also on crop land. Production of REEs reportedly creates a tremendous amount of solid waste, and this waste has to go somewhere. Perhaps more often than not, it simply gets dumped using the cheapest means possible, which often means pumping it into a remote area where it ends up seeping into the ground or getting washed downstream to areas where food is being grown.

And it isnt just China and Malaysia where such mining is taking place. Molycorp Minerals, which is currently trying to work through a debt dispute, was (and could once again soon be) a major producer of REEs in the state of California. The Vale corporation is working through trying to mine REEs in Brazil, and a Toyota subsidiary is prepping to start mining REEs in Vietnam as well. Even the mostly uninhabited country of Greenland is on the radar for possible REE mining operations, as the ice-covered nation is said to be rich in them.

But the long-term consequences of such mining are disastrous, as evidenced by a half-century of such operations taking place throughout China. Official reports indicate that all of this REE mining and processing has severely damaged surface vegetation, caused soil erosion, pollution, and acidification, and reduced or even eliminated food crop output.

Most rare earth minerals are conjoined with cancer-causing radioactive elements like thorium

Another thing to keep in mind about the nature of REE mining is that almost all REEs are bound to radioactive substances in the ground from which they have to be separated in order to be used in green energy technologies and consumer products. This is what makes REEs rare as theyre not actually rare in their quantity so much as they are rare in their purity.

In many cases, REEs are bound to the radioactive element thorium in the ground, which has to be refined and processed in order to remove it. In the process, this chemical is released into the environment where its been linked to causing increases in cancers of the lungs, pancreas, and other vital organs.

As the worlds hunger for these elements increases the waste is going to increase, says Nicholas Leadbeater, a chemist from the University of Connecticut whose research focus centers around green technologies.

The more mines there are, the more trouble theres going to be, he adds, noting that emerging research is working on developing new types of green technologies that do not require REEs in order to function. One example is an electric motor, currently under development by Toyota, that does not require the use of an REE-powered battery.

http://investmentwat...ghly-polluting/

Edited by Mario Milano, 05 January 2018 - 02:16 PM.

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#48 LiebenUndLeben

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Posted 05 January 2018 - 04:31 PM

This story is dripping with coverup juice.


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#49 Hellboy

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Posted 05 January 2018 - 05:01 PM

Hydroelectricity is the best thing in the world.

 

I heard Ethiopia which has hydroelectricty (and millions of poor starving people) would 'donate' their power to Europe.

 

This world is good.

 

:clap:


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#50 Kingranch

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Posted 05 January 2018 - 05:22 PM

Hydro is good enough and very predictable. If we could harvest 'the wave action' instead of building dams it'll be even better. Problem with wind and solar (when power is critical) is that there is always a diesel generator next to it!  


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#51 grog

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Posted 06 January 2018 - 10:45 AM

Climate mystery that has puzzled scientists for over a decade is solved
 
 
 
 
 
 
2018-01-05
 
 
 
 
 
 
https%3A%2F%2Fblueprint-api-production.s
 
Just over a decade ago, scientists found that methane - a potent greenhouse gas - had begun to rapidly increase in our atmosphere. The amounts of gas leaking into the sky has risen each year since, and there are two obvious candidates for this surge: Either the release of methane from the oil and gas industry, or naturally released methane from the world's tropical swamps and marshes. 
 
But when researchers did the math, things didn't add up. 
 
The amount of methane in the Earth's atmosphere has been increasing by around 25 teragrams each year since 2006 - which, NASA notes, is about the weight of a whopping 425,000 elephants (seriously). Yet, when scientists calculated the likely estimates of both methane from the gas industry or marshes, their numbers were way overblown, vastly exceeding the 25 teragrams being added each year. So for ten years, there's been a bonafide methane mystery. 
 
Now, however, the mystery has likely been solved, and it turns out the methane comes from another source.
 
A group of atmospheric scientists from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and other research institutions looked at satellite data showing that the amount of land burned globally by fires had been dropping during this period. 
 
Their research, published this week in the journal Nature Communications, illustrates that this decrease in burned vegetation resulted in a notable drop in methane being released - enough to make the global methane numbers sink down to the measurement of 25 teragrams in Earth's atmosphere.
 
"There is agreement there is a puzzle and this likely solves this particular puzzle," said NASA atmospheric scientist John Worden in an interview. Worden is also the study's lead author.
 
"What we show is that there has been a larger than expected decline in methane from fires," said Worden.
 
Specifically, this decrease in fire-born methane emissions was twice as much than researchers anticipated. Worden and his team measured the distinct fingerprint of methane from burning vegetation using NASA's Terra and Aura satellites.
 
For a decade, scientists not involved with this NASA-led study were equally puzzled by the sources of this greenhouse gas surge.
 
"Yes, this was a significant puzzle and conundrum that had emerged in atmospheric data," said Penn State University atmospheric scientist Ken Davis in an interview. 
 
"There's been a ping-pong game of explanations going back and forth about what might explain this," he said, referencing the earlier studies that suggested tropical marshes and rice paddies could be contributing more methane, while other studies pointed to the oil and gas industry. 
 
But this decline in global wildfires seems to settle matters, for now. "It's a complicated puzzle with a lot of parts," said Davis, "but [the study's conclusions] do seem plausible and likely." 
 
There are still regions in the world that experience heavy fire activity, specifically areas like central Africa. Here, farmers deliberately set blazes to kill off unwanted plants and to enrich the soil with the nutrients from burned vegetation. 
 
But on a global scale, fire activity - and the associated methane releases from this burning - has been dropping.
 
Although methane from fires has dropped off, the study suggests that just the opposite is occurring for methane released from swamps and human fossil fuel activity. "This argues that both of [these sources] have increased significantly between 2008 and 2014," said Davis. 
 
Methane, like the carbon dioxide released from coal power plants and gas-powered cars, traps incoming and outgoing solar radiation and warms the planet. Methane is a more potent greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide, though it remains in the atmosphere for a far shorter period, on the order of several decades. 
 
"Methane is an important greenhouse gas because per molecule it is 20 to 30 times more potent than a molecule of carbon dioxide for absorbing infrared radiation," Worden said. This means there's greater potential for increased trapping of radiation on Earth, and accordingly, more warming. The consequences of a warmer Earth are known and already being experienced today - such as extreme weather events - but at least this research clarifies where this potent greenhouse gas is coming from - and where it isn't.
 
"We care about what the cause is because we want to understand what's driving the climate system," said Davis.
 
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https%3A%2F%2Fblueprint-api-production.s
 
 
 
 

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#52 grog

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Posted 06 January 2018 - 10:47 AM

"BETTER CLEAN AND FREE THAN DIRTY FOSSIL TRUMP"

 

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#53 grog

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Posted 22 January 2018 - 04:12 PM

This solar power plant in Nevada could finally wean humanity off of fossil fuels
 
 
 
 
 
January 21, 2018
 
 
 
 
 
An hour away from Area 51 in the Nevada desert, a beacon shines inexhaustibly day after day. And while its proximity to the famous classified zone makes some travelers believe they have seen something alien, the artifact is far from being extraterrestrial.
 
The beacon is part of a revolutionary solar generating and storage technology that may finally make solar power an undeniable competitor to coal and nuclear. With the first utility-scale facility already operating in Crescent Dunes, Nevada (and several more under development around the world), we are hopefully seeing the beginning of a new era in energy production. 
 
The technology is called concentrated solar power (CSP) and uses a system of mirrors to concentrate solar energy and turn it into thermal by heating up a medium. The Crescent Dunes Power Plant, developed by the company SolarReserve, uses salts to capture and store the energy from the sun. The result is solar power available 24 hours a day, that can meet utility demands just like a conventional fossil fuels, except without any emissions or hazardous waste. 
 
While a CSP facility may look like a photovoltaic farm, the only similarity is that both technologies use sunlight as fuel.
 
At Crescent Dunes the sun's energy is concentrates via 10,347 tracking mirrors called heliostats to a precise point on top of a central receiver tower. Highly accurate GPS measurements and algorithms enable the movement of the mirrors throughout the day and the positioning of the beam on the receiver.
 
Cold salt, stored in a tank next to the tower, is pumped up to collect the generated heat which can reach up to a 1000 degrees Fahrenheit. The molten salt is then pumped down into a hot salt tank which acts like a battery, preserving the heat for up to 16 hours. Unlike batteries, however, molten salt lasts for 40 years or more, without any degradation or need for replacement and it also costs less.
 
The molten salt in the tank can then be used to generate steam to drive a turbine and create electricity. This part of the cycle is identical to the process used in traditional coal or nuclear power plants, except it is 100 percent renewable and 100 percent clean.
 
The Crescent Dunes plant produces more than 500,000 megawatt-hours of electricity per year, twice the generation of an equivalent sized photovoltaics (PV) plant. Storage allows the facility to produce more than twice as much net annual output (kilowatt hours) than an equivalent sized photovoltaic (PV) solar project. Its 1.1 gigawatt-hour storage capability alone is about equal to all the world's utility scale batteries combined. 
 
100% of the generated energy is purchased by NV Energy under a 25-year contract, and used for distribution to its customers during peak demand periods can power. The solar plant can power 75,000 homes, day and night.
 
Now, falling prices of CSP are making prospects for the technology look promising. The new plants SolarReserve is building in Australia and Chile are expected to sell power at 6 and 5 cents per kilowatt-hour respectively - prices comparable to those from photovoltaics. Construction costs have also been cut in half, from almost $1 billion for the Crescent Dunes plant.
 
Mark Mehos, program manager for CSP research at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Colorado said for Inside Climate News:
 
"We really need to see installations, on the ground, that match those bids and that operate reliably."
 
The construction and performance of the new CSP plants currently in the pipeline will be the deciding factor for the future of the technology. But Mehos is optimistic, "It seems inescapable, doesn't it?"
 
 
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#54 grog

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Posted 03 February 2018 - 04:25 PM

Australian Solar Installs Are Going Through The Roof
 
 
 
 
 
February 2nd, 2018
 
 
 
 
 
Extraordinary figures continue to roll in from the year that was for renewable energy in Australia, but easily the most outstanding so far are the numbers - and "eye watering charts" - that have just come in on national solar PV installations for 2017.
 
The latest tally from PV market analysts SunWiz has revealed a record smashing total so far of 1.25GW of solar PV installed across 2017, making it out and away the biggest year for the market in Australia ever, eclipsing the former record set in 2012.
 
"Our numbers aren't finalised yet … but our 2017 Australian PV installation tally now sits at 1.25GW," said SunWiz managing director Warwick Johnston in a note outlining the highlights from the company's 2017 Year in Review.
 
"We calculate that 1.12GW of sub-100kW PV has been installed in 2017, though it will take a few months to true-up to this level in the STC registry. We've identified at least 138MW of (large-scale certificate) eligible systems."
 
But that's not even the best of it.
 
As Johnston notes, the truly "outstanding figure" from 2017 is the 50 per cent year-on-year growth in the sub-100kW PV market - the solar installed on Australian homes and businesses.
 
As you can see in the charts below, while there was an impressive rebound in the residential market (0-10kW installations), it was the late-blooming commercial sector that really put a rocket under PV growth.
 
Commercial solar installs made up more than 30 per cent of sub-100kW capacity in 2017, and as the bottom right chart reveals, the year-on-year growth rates of the various size sub-categories are "astonishing," says Johnston - particularly in the 10-20kW (72 per cent growth) and 75-100kW (82 per cent) segments.
 
All up, there was more than 60 per cent growth in the sub-100kW commercial solar market and almost twice as much volume in the 101-1000kW range.
 
On a state by state basis, there was decent growth all round, with New South Wales, the Northern Territory and Western Australia all charting their biggest year on record - NSW topping the charts with 61 per cent growth in installations, year-on-year.
 
Source: SunWiz (click on image to enlarge)
 
And Johnston expects that 2018 might be just as exciting.
 
"2017 was a magnificent, record-setting year for solar installations, and many people were still up on roofs installing over the summer break," Johnston writes.
 
"It may actually not be possible to pause to catch breath, as we're already hearing that January 2018 is notably busier for commercial sales than in past years."
 
Johnston says the growth in Australia's commercial solar market comes down to a number of factors, the major ones - as with residential - being rising power prices and the falling cost of installing PV systems.
 
"Electricity price rises have been proportionally higher in commercial, as they're more closely related to wholesale electricity prices, which have skyrocketed of late," he told RenewEconomy on Thursday.
 
"Electricity bills have now grabbed the attention of company directors and CFOs.
 
Meanwhile, he adds, Australian solar companies are getting more experienced and skilled at selling and installing commercial PV. And that job is made easier by falling technology prices.
 
"Commercial paybacks are down to three to four years in some cases," Johnston told RE.
 
"Many of the companies visited (by solar installers) two years ago are calling back now to say 'is your quote still good, only to find out that prices have gone down and payback's gotten better."
 
And, of course, all of the above bodes well for battery storage installations in Australia, as homes and businesses look to get even more value from their solar PV, and further reduce their exposure to grid power prices.
 
We haven't seen data, yet, on final numbers for home and commercial battery installs for 2017, but we will be keeping an eye out.
 
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#55 Pete_V

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Posted 03 February 2018 - 04:27 PM

Solar energy? Does it reduce my bills at the end of the month? That's all i care about solar energy or any other energy since i don't buy into the Globull Warming baloney.


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#56 mooosk

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Posted 14 February 2019 - 11:21 AM

The difference between inverters and non-inverters, I do not know, if not difficult to explain. Everything is very simple. Premium class inverter - this is all that many and long talk about inverters goo.gl and its benefits (I’m tired of listing). The middle class inverter is primarily a smooth supply of cooled air and more precise control of maintaining the desired temperature in the room (rather than a temporary supply of icy air, as start-feet do). There is no need to talk about substantial energy saving or advanced heating mode.


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#57 Mario Milano

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Posted 14 February 2019 - 11:43 AM

Solar I am not against but those wind farms are horrible, the amount of birds they kill is staggering


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#58 RobertD

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Posted 15 February 2019 - 06:38 AM

Solar I am not against but those wind farms are horrible, the amount of birds they kill is staggering


BS. How many birds get hit by cars on the highway? They have eyes just like we do.
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