Jump to content

Theme© by Fisana
 

Photo

Early Draft Of The Bible Discovered; Experts Say It Proves Bible Is 'Fiction'

The Bible Book Of Revelation

  • Please log in to reply
296 replies to this topic

#281 grog

grog

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4005 posts

Posted 11 May 2018 - 10:32 AM

SCHOOL DISTRICT ALLEGEDLY PUNISHED LGBT STUDENT BY FORCING THEM TO READ BIBLE PASSAGES
 
 
 
 
 
May 10, 2018
 
 
 
 
 
 
what-is-justification-by-faith-part-1-21
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
The Oregon Department of Education is investigating allegations that a school administrator made a LGTQ high school student read a Bible passage as a punishment.
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
A school district in Oregon reportedly forced an LGBTQ student to read Bible passages as punishment.
 
The allegations state that an LGBTQ high school student from North Bend High School was forced to read a Bible passage from an administrator of the school to be "disciplined," according to local publication The World. The allegations were sent in a letter from the Oregon Department of Education to North Bend School District Superintendent Bill Yester.
 
"In conclusion, the department finds that discrimination on the basis of sex and sexual orientation may have occurred," Mark Mayer, complaint and appeals coordinator for ODE, wrote in the letter.
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
The Oregon Department of Education is investigating allegations that a school administrator made a LGTQ high school student read a Bible passage as a punishment.
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
The ODE is currently investigating the allegations and if forcing a student to read the Bible is violating the student's First Amendment rights.
 
"There is substantial evidence to support the allegation that the district subjected LGBTQ students to separate or different rules of behavior, sanctions, or other treatment," the letter continued. 
 
Newsweek has reached out to the ODE for further comment but did not hear back in time for publication.
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
In a statement sent to Newsweek, the district said it received two complaints from students alleging they were discriminated against because of their sexual orientation. An additional claim alleged that the district failed to address sexual harassment complaints from LGBTQ students, according to The World.
 
The incident with the Bible was a single occurrence and "corrective action" has been taken. 
 
"The District investigated the incident of an administrator requiring a student to read from the Bible as a form of discipline and found that it was a single occurrence. The District has taken corrective action," the statement read.
 
The District's statement also noted a hearings officer from the ODE will hold a hearing on Thursday, May 24 where they will meet with state officials to discuss the discrimination allegations.
 
"The District works hard every day to make sure all students feel respected and safe at school and will continue these efforts regardless of the outcome of this hearing," the statement read.
___________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
___________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
 
 
 
 
 
___________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

  • 0

#282 Traveler

Traveler

    Registered User

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2006 posts

Posted 11 May 2018 - 01:52 PM

The Oregon Department of Education is investigating allegations that a school administrator made a LGTQ high school student read a Bible passage as a punishment.

 

Probably find the student had been christian bashing the other students which was why he ended up in the admins office in the first place. In fact the kid was probably so bad that the administrator decided to test the kid to see if he was demon possessed or not ! The adverse reaction speaks for itself, kids toast.


  • 0

#283 grog

grog

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4005 posts

Posted 11 May 2018 - 05:11 PM

Doc Used to ID Satan Worship May Also Describe Computer & InfoSec Enthusiasts
 
 
 
 
 
 
May 7, 2018
 
 
 
 
 
 
A document distributed by police in 1989 to identify Satanic Worshippers during the "Satanic Panic" in the 80s has criteria that many teens, hard core computer users, and security researchers may identify with. For many, growing up in the 80s was a painful period where a teenagers's interests in music, role-playing games, and trying to understand the world around them were often misunderstood and ridiculed by adults.
 
Posted to Twitter this weekend by Jennifer Jordan, a document from 1989 was discovered in her sister's teacher supply closet called "Identification, Investigation, and Understanding of Ritualistic Criminal Activity". This document was distributed by police to teachers to help them identify students who may be involved in Satanic or occult rituals.
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
View image on TwitterView image on TwitterView image on TwitterView image on Twitter
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
Jennifer Jordan
 
@jennlynnjordan
 
 Hoooooooly crap guys. My sister is an art teacher in FLA, and she found this AMAZING document in her supply closet
 
3:56 PM - May 6, 2018
 
39.3K
 
10.7K people are talking about this
 
Twitter Ads info and privacy
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
While some of the characteristics in the document should be a cause of concern or discussion for a parent, such as "Animal Slaughter", suicidal thoughts and writing, alienation, or maybe even altars in a basement, many of the other identifying criteria could just have easily been attributed to being a teenager, a loner, or may I daresay, an adventurous harware/computer/security enthusiast?
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
"Characteristics of Teen Involved" in Ritualistic Behavior
 
According to the document, some of the characteristics associated with Satanic worship include "Fantasy Role Play", "Experimentalist", "Underachiever", "Curiosity Beyond Norm", "Intelligent",  "Low Self-Esteem", "Creative", and "Bored". Many of these are ones that I have seen security researchers and computer enthusiasts associate themselves with, while finding solace and a sense of exploration pushing a computer to its limits and beyond.
 
In reality, most of these are traits that should be encouraged rather than being shut down.
 
This document also lists symptoms that may indicate ritualistic behavior. The one I love is when the "Book of Shadow" is mentioned, it also states that these teenagers "May use computer with access codes".  I think we all fit into that characteristic these days.
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
"Symptoms of Increased Involvement"
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
Let's not forget that the type of music you listened to was also a determinant of whether you were a Devil worshipper. If you listened to Led Zeppeling IV, otherwise known as ZoSo, and happened to scribble the logo on your binder, or listened to Metallica, Iron Maiden, Black Sabbath, or Ronnie James Dio, then you were obviously into Satan.
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
Band/Album Logos
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
Finally, we have the resource groups available for kids who exhibit this behavior. Included in the list is BADD (Bothered Against Dungeons and Dragons), which was an organization that felt that D&D was the work of the Devil. Yes, even role-playing games were under attack in the 80s.
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
"Resource Groups"
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
I would like to think that adults are more tolerant to kids who may act differently or have interests that do not align with main stream beliefs. Who knows, maybe if  creative thinking and exploration is encouraged, one of these teenagers could become the next Bill Gates or Steve Jobs.
 
Then again, maybe I live in a bubble and it's just as bad out there as it was in the 80s.
 
For those interested in reading the entire "Identification, Investigation, and Understanding of Ritualistic Criminal Activity" document, you can read it here. 
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
Image Source: Social image from opensource.com.
___________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
___________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
darkroom.jpg
 
57af23cfc361889b178b45e8.jpg
 
 

  • 0

#284 grog

grog

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4005 posts

Posted 21 May 2018 - 04:00 PM

Disney Cancels 35-Year-Old Music Festival Because It's "Too Christian"
 
 
 
 
 
May 11, 2018
 
 
 
 
 
Disney has cancelled popular music festival "Night of Joy" after 35 years due to the fact that it is "too Christian" for modern audiences.
 
"Last year was our last event," a spokeswoman for the event said Thursday.
 
Orlandosentinel.com reports: The event began in 1983 at Magic Kingdom, where it remained for most of its 35-year run. There was a two-year span at Disney's Hollywood Studios, and for the past two years, it had been held at the ESPN Wide World of Sports complex. The second night of the 2017 event was called off because of the threat of Hurricane Irma.
 
Among the final performers last year were TobyMac and MercyMe. No lineup had been announced for a possible 2018 event.
 
Through the years, the festival - almost exclusively held in early September - has attracted big names of the Christian-music genre, including Steven Curtis Chapman, Amy Grant, Jars of Clay, Newsboys, Casting Crowns, Chris Tomlin, Kirk Franklin, Michael W. Smith, CeCe Winans, Stryper and Debby Boone.
 
It may have inspired a competitor. In 1998, Universal Studios started holding a two-night, extra-ticket event called Rock the Universe, featuring Christian artists. It will be held Sept. 7-8 this year. Among its 12 acts wil be Jesus Culture, TobyMac and Casting Crowns.
 
The elimination of the Night of Joy event was part of the resort's philosophy of "continually changing our offerings," the Disney World spokeswoman said.
 
Christian artists MercyMe and Tauren Wells will be in the Eat to the Beat concerts series, part of the Epcot International Food & Wine Festival this year. Both artists will appear in six concerts over two nights in early September.
 
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
    
 
 
 
 

  • 0

#285 grog

grog

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4005 posts

Posted 22 May 2018 - 08:41 AM

7 Sanctuaries linked by a straight line:
 
The legendary Sword of St. Michael
 
 
  
gallery-la-leggenda-di-mont-saint-michel
 
 
 
 
 
May 31, 2017
 
 
 
 
 
According to legend, the line represents the blow with which St. Michael sent the devil to hell.
 
A mysterious imaginary line links seven monasteries, from Ireland to Israel. Is it just a coincidence? These seven sanctuaries are very far from each other, and yet they are perfectly aligned (siviaggia.it).
 
The Sacred Line of Saint Michael the Archangel represents, according to legend, the blow the Saint inflicted the Devil, sending him to hell.
 
In any case, it is surprising how well these sanctuaries are, in fact, aligned. But the details of such alignment are also astonishing: the three most important sites, Mont Saint Michel in France; the Sacra of San Miguel in Val de Susa; and the Sanctuary of Monte Sant'Angelo in the Gargano are all the same distance one from the other. Some say this is a reminder from the Holy Archangel: the faithful are expected to be righteous, walking the straight path.
 
If all this was not surprising enough, the Sacred Line also is perfectly aligned with the sunset on the day of the Northern Hemisphere's Summer Solstice (www.viagginews.com).
 
Click "Launch the Slideshow" in the image below for a list of the 7 Sanctuaries, incredibly linked by a straight line:
 
Launch the slideshow 
 
___________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
___________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________

Edited by grog, 22 May 2018 - 09:16 AM.

  • 0

#286 grog

grog

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4005 posts

Posted 22 May 2018 - 01:14 PM

The little-known story of how St. Thomas the Apostle brought Christianity to India
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
May 18, 2018
 
 
 
 
 
 
For the St. Thomas Christians, there is still no doubt that theirs is an unbroken tradition going back to their patron's arrival in the year 52.
 
Pentecost delivered the gift of tongues soon after Jesus had proclaimed: "… go and make disciples of all nations." The paradox is how little recognition goes to the evangelist who used his powers of communication to take the message further than anyone else.
 
Eight days after Jesus met his disciples following the Resurrection, he encountered St. Thomas. Since then, St. Thomas the Apostle has been better known as Doubting Thomas. His least-used title is "Apostle of India." In the Subcontinent, the situation is very different. There, even the vast non-Christian majority of 1.7 billion are mostly aware of his role as missionary extraordinaire.
 
When Vasco da Gama's fleet reached India in 1498, the Portuguese were surprised to find Christian communities thriving in the south of the Subcontinent. They were even more surprised by the locals' certainty that their church had been established by St. Thomas. They shouldn't have been, as countless travellers, including Marco Polo, had claimed that the saint's grave was there. St. Thomas had preached to the Hindus and the Jews of southern India and had won thousands of converts. For the St. Thomas Christians, there is still no doubt that theirs is an unbroken tradition going back to their patron's arrival in 52.
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
Click "Launch a slideshow" in the image below:
 
Launch the slideshow 
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
There has been a revival of interest in St. Thomas's path through the Middle East, with the continuing plight of Christians in Syria and Iraq. Further east than that, however, the co-religionist radar is picking up almost nothing. A recent book by one of the most enterprising travelers of present times might help western Christians look again at the development of their faith.
 
Serena Fass is an 80-year-old writer, photographer and wanderer who has followed St. Thomas's progress across much of Asia. Her book In the Footsteps of St. Thomas corroborates the evidence that has existed for centuries. This does not come from the Bible or other texts that historians find unreliable, although written sources described his travels as long ago as 1,800 years. On-site investigation is the new key to unlocking the truth about St. Thomas.
 
There are few Christian communities that go back to the time of Jesus's disciples. Serena Fass finds much to support the beliefs that the faithful in India hold firm to, although there are still plenty who dispute them. In those pioneering days, India was the magnet that drew Europe to the East. When Columbus chanced upon what was later called the West Indies, it was India he thought he had reached. India was the trading world's most profitable destination.
 
The evidence of Thomas's presence in India is considerable. Some of it stretches the imagination while the rest is at least as plausible as the Turin Shroud, albeit with less publicity. Keeping a low profile has been the secret of survival. Levels of hostility to Christians in India are on the rise, and the belief that St. Thomas was martyred by either a local ruler or a Brahmin priest hardly lessens what is considered by some Hindus to be a blood libel.
 
St. Thomas's tomb is less conspicuous than that of other Apostles to be honored with a basilica. His original south Indian resting place was not in a Christian stronghold, and he was buried without much ceremony. Most of his bones were removed from India in the 3rd century and sent to Edessa in Mesopotamia, where the saint's vital role in India was acknowledged at the time. Once again the bones' progress is followed across the globe by Serena Fass as they eventually end up in the Italian town of Ortona.
 
The Catholic Church maintains a neutral stance on the proposition that Christianity might have been established in India long before it was in most of Europe. There is more evidence of St. Thomas's life in India than anywhere else; in 1956 Pope Pius XII granted minor basilica status to San Thome Cathedral in Madras.
 
Serena Fass has collated traditions handed down over almost 2,000 years, along with a physical trail that includes some very old Crosses. The "Thomas Christians" of India use a Cross of distinctive shape. Crucifixes are rare, as would be expected of a community that started long before the Corpus became an accepted part of Christian imagery.
 
Relics of St. Thomas are less common than his tombs, of which there are purportedly six. A fascinating reliquary exists in Mylapore. Originally housing some of the saint's bones, it is now empty. The decoration tells a heartening story of coexistence in India. With decoration in Hindu style, probably by Muslim craftsmen, on a Christian theme, it is a testament to Indian multiculturalism. The only thing missing is a Jewish element; it is known that the earliest converts to Christianity in southern India were, like Thomas himself, Jews. This is part of the Diaspora that tends to be as forgotten by the Jewish community as St. Thomas of India is by Christians around the world.
 
Even if every other part of the St. Thomas story is one day proved to be false, there can be no doubting the Thomas Christians' incontrovertible inks with Syrian Christianity. In southern India they still use the liturgical Syriac language - a dialect of the Aramaic language spoken by Jesus and St. Thomas. Syria was the bedrock of early Christianity and an important part of the Roman empire, trading with southern India from the Red Sea. This was inevitable for the Romans, with their addiction to pepper and knowledge of monsoon winds. Roman coins and other evidence is found in abundance. In the 1930s one of Britain's greatest archaeologists, Sir Mortimer Wheeler, even found the remains of a Roman trading post.
 
At a time when the earliest Christian communities are being eradicated in the Middle East, their legacy at least lives on in India, thanks to St. Thomas.
 
___________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
___________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
 
 
 
___________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

  • 0

#287 grog

grog

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4005 posts

Posted 24 May 2018 - 10:25 AM

Why Jesus is no longer the one way to heaven for many American Christians
 
 
 
 
 
23 May 2018
 
 
 
 
 
Just over two months ago, as winter landed its final blows of snow in New York City, Michael A. Walrond Jr. of Harlem's 10,000-member First Corinthian Baptist Church landed an ideological blow of his own in traditional Christendom.
 
Walrond, who was named "One of the Lord's Foot Soldiers" by Newsweek magazine, told his congregants that the belief that anyone who doesn't believe in Jesus is going to hell is "insanity."
 
"There was a time when you would see people in the pulpit say, 'well, if you don't believe in Jesus you going to Hell. That's insanity in many ways because that is not what Jesus even believes," he said in a viral clip posted to Facebook.
 
People take many paths to God, he argued, noting that he personally celebrates the paths others take in finding Him - even if that path does not involve faith in Jesus.
 
"And so the key is you believe in God. And whatever your path is to God I celebrate that. Personally, I celebrate that," Walrond said.
 
The New York City preacher's message drew criticism in traditional Christian circles.
 
"The preacher on this video is both right and wrong: he's right in that all roads do lead to God; but this God is both love and a consuming fire. If you meet Him on the Christ road of His love you live, but any other road, be it religion, philosophy, or a miscalculation of the Person of Christ, the lake of fire is waiting!" Bishop Robert E. Smith, Sr., founder of Total Outreach for Christ Ministries, Inc. and Word of Outreach Christian Center and Academy in Little Rock, Arkansas, said.
 
While Walrond's openness as a Christian to the idea that there are many paths to God beyond Christianity may have been shocking to some, new research shows a widespread departure among Christians from traditional Bible teaching such as Jesus being the only way to God. And some scholars have blamed this ideological shift in part on influential divinity schools and charismatic church leaders.
 
Rejecting God of the Bible
 
In 2008, a Pew Research Center Study found that more than half of all American Christians believe that at least some non-Christian faiths can lead to salvation. Nearly a decade later, a new study has shown that even among the most traditional Christian groups, significant minorities are also rejecting God as described in the Bible.
 
While 80 percent of all Americans surveyed in the new study, also conducted by the Pew Research Center, said they believe in God, only 56 percent say the God they believe in is the one "as described in the Bible."
 
The strongest supporters of God as described in the Bible were Christians who self-identified as members of historically black Protestant churches at 92 percent, followed closely by evangelicals at 91 percent.
 
Significant minorities of Christians who identified as Catholics, 28 percent, and mainline Protestants, 26 percent, indicated that they believe in a higher power or spiritual force which is not God as described in the Bible.
 
Ken Stone, academic dean at Chicago Theological Seminary where Walrond serves as a trustee and adjunct faculty member, told The Christian Post that Walrond's celebration of "multiple paths to God" and the wisdom and truth found in various religious traditions is in line with the school's approach to faith. It is, said Stone, the "future of theological education."
 
Shannon Johnson Kershner, who leads the 5,500-member Fourth Presbyterian Church in Chicago, Illinois, also caused a stir when she said in an interview last fall  that she too didn't believe Jesus is the only way to God because "God's not a Christian."
 
"God's not a Christian. I mean, we are ... For me, the Christian tradition is the way to understand God and my relationship with the world and other humans and it's for the way for me to move into that relationship but I'm not about to say what God can and cannot do in other ways and with other spiritual experiences," she explained.
 
J. Lanier Burns, research professor of theological studies and senior professor of systematic theology at Dallas Theological Seminary, explained in an interview with CP that this shift away from traditional Bible-based teaching among Christians to a more pluralistic approach to faith in God is an agenda item of higher education institutions.
 
"This is the agenda of the universities at the present time because it is felt that maybe it is religion that has generated all the wars and so maybe if we can get rid of exclusive religion we might have greater peace in the world," Burns said.
 
"We have got to get back to truth but I think it's a very long way back now because I think the force is against us. I would include all the divinity schools here - like Harvard, Yale, and so forth. These are all pluralistic schools ... I think they (elite universities) are the most powerful institutions in the world today. I think they train everybody indirectly," he said. "I've had a fellowship at Harvard, I've been to Oxford several times and they have tangible power. And they are using that for pluralism ... When you add up the university influence around the world it's vast."
 
Several scholars from both Harvard and Yale divinity schools were invited to discuss the role of their institutions in the growing acceptance of multiple paths to God in American Christian culture and only one, Harvey Cox, Hollis research professor of divinity at Harvard, briefly responded.
 
"I do not have much to add on this, except that I do not believe Harvard is the blame!" Cox said in an email.
 
Progressive Bias in Higher Ed
 
Mitchell Langbert, an associate professor of business management at Brooklyn College found strong evidence of a progressive bias among professors, especially among those that teach religion at leading American colleges.
 
In a recent study of 8,688 tenure track, Ph.D.-holding professors from 51 of the 66 top ranked liberal arts colleges in the U.S. News 2017 report, Langbert found that there are more than ten Democrats for every one Republican among elite professors. And in religion departments, Democrats outnumber Republicans by 70 to 1. A similar trend toward the left among academia was also observed in Britain. These political biases could be indicative of a theological bias as well.
 
"Political homogeneity is problematic because it biases research and teaching and reduces academic credibility," Langbert wrote in his findings published by the National Association of Scholars. "... Even though more Americans are conservative than liberal, academic psychologists' biases cause them to believe that conservatism is deviant."
 
Data from the latest Pew Research Center study on what Americans mean when they say they believe in God, also points to a strong correlation between higher education and fidelity to traditional Christian beliefs.
 
The study found that more educated Americans are less likely to say they believe in the God of the Bible.
 
College graduates less likely to believe in active, involved deity
 
Just over 66 percent of American adults with a high school education or less say they believe in the biblical God. Among those with some college education that number drops to 53 percent, and among college graduates it drops even further to 45 percent.
 
Burns, who worked as a missionary to India for 46 years and has done post-doctoral research at Harvard and Oxford universities, also pointed to the failure of churches and lazy Christians. The increasing departure of Christians from traditional beliefs is directly linked to a departure from the authority of Scripture, he said.
 
"We are going wrong because we have moved the authority from Scripture to consensus. That's where we are going wrong. When you say a certain percentage of people don't believe in hell, well I go to hell conferences rethinking hell and they simply say this is not something that Christians can believe in because it's inconsistent with the character of God," he said.
 
He also blames the evangelical church for not discipling all church members to be ministers according to Scripture.
 
"I fault the evangelical church on so many things. My doctrine of the church says every member is a minister. So I believe the problem is the American people have paid charismatic leaders, even people like Billy Graham and people like this, to do the work of ministry for them. But every Christian needs to be out talking about these things. And I think what we do is we're lazy. So we pay other people to do our work for us," he said.
 
The Dallas professor further noted that he is worried that Christians who hold traditional Christian beliefs will be persecuted.
 
"I think it's going to result in the persecution of people who believe in traditional Christianity because I think the universities are already against what I've told you already that I believe. I know that I am a minority on these things, OK? I'm not expressing a majority viewpoint I know that. But I believe it and here I stand," he said.
 
Mark R. Teasdale, E. Stanley Jones associate professor of evangelism at Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary in Evanston, Illinois, agrees that institutions dedicated to the formation of healthy Christian disciples such as the local church and seminaries "stopped being effective gatekeepers" who contend earnestly for the faith.
 
"I do think the local church, the seminaries, I'll own that, that we stopped being effective gatekeepers within the Christian community. In 1904, we (Methodists) passed a resolution that professors in theological schools would no longer check their doctrine. So it didn't matter what you believed; you could come and teach in a theology school in Methodism. And so as a result of that our theological schools have moved more in the direction of focusing on more traditional higher education studies in religion and theology, less in terms of Christian formation and character formation. There is a move to try and recapture that now but this is over a century after we have gone the other way," he said.
 
"The internal effect that that has had on the local church is I think coming out in these much broader streams and changes you're recognizing in the Pew research," Teasdale explained.
 
"Seminaries are a big part of that. We've moved in the direction of wanting to be professionalized graduate schools and not so much schools that were forming people in character and it creates a cycle. So as pastors go out that have been developed in that kind of seminary, they don't have the skills to catechize their own members very effectively. And so when people come to the seminaries they often come with a really not very well developed faith. They are not quite sure what they believe," he said.
 
Searching for Deeper Meaning
 
While the slide away from biblical authority does not reflect among evangelicals as significantly as other Christian denominations, Teasdale explained that a search for meaning in a postmodern culture also appears to have challenged some to abandon deeply held beliefs about God.
 
"Before the time when evangelicalism arose, the focus was in making certain that we had absolutes. So the belief of modernity was the belief that there are absolutes. Everyone could have access to those absolutes if they simply use their reason appropriately and that those absolutes would hold no matter what the situation you're in," Teasdale said.
 
"What happens in postmodernity is that the idea of absolutes become far less important. Instead, we're looking at a time when narrative story becomes much more important. And so people are looking for something meaningful, a meaningful story to make sense of their lives.
 
"And it doesn't really matter much whether it's 'true' in the sense that it fits with an absolute truth that's out there somewhere. What matters is that it's meaningful for you and that's really what's important," he explained.
 
"I think that evangelicals kind of got caught with that shift because evangelicalism had gotten very good at dealing with modernity. It had gotten good with dealing with questions of people saying I'm skeptical of proof that there was a physical resurrection of Christ or I'm skeptical there's proof that miracles could occur.
 
"Evangelicals got very good at responding to those sorts of things but then all of a sudden the whole nature of the culture shifted and people stopped worrying so much about whether something actually happened ... instead, they just got focused on whether or not something was meaningful for them and that was a different set of questions," Teasdale added.
 
And because some evangelicals are not sure what is the most effective response to questions directed at deeper meaning, this has led to a dialing back of traditional beliefs such as Jesus being the only way to God, the Illinois professor pointed out.
 
"Oftentimes, the other piece to this I think, is when they're asking, 'is it meaningful?' it's not the answer that many times evangelicals would give which is, 'well, this is deeply meaningful because it has an eternal aspect to it,'" said Teasdale.
 
"The response more and more that people in a postmodern culture have given is 'we really don't care about the eternal aspect, we care about now. We don't know what comes next and we're not too concerned about what comes next. We're concerned about the fact that right now we feel like there are problems in our own lives, that are upsetting the lives of people around the world, how is it going to give me a sense of meaning or improve my quality of life in the here and now?'" he continued.
 
"I think that's been a big part of what's affected evangelicals - trying to recast their telling of the salvation narrative in a way that is something that people will grab a hold of in a culture that's more concerned about meaning and more concerned about affecting quality of life in the here and now than are concerned about dealing with eternal salvation or asking questions about how do we know the Bible is true."
 
Finding a Fuller Gospel
 
While this grappling with postmodernism will remain a negative for evangelicals because it's "uncomfortable" and "does disrupt the way that evangelicals have traditionally understood how they express their faith," Teasdale believes it can result in a positive outcome.
 
"The reason for that is what it's doing is that it's stripping away a lot of the old debate that I think had in some ways come to the place of defining how people thought broadly about the Christian faith. It's science or it's faith, for example. You can either believe this way or that way. Everything is said in very stark contrasting terms and that's the logic of modernity where things are said in those dichotomies," Teasdale argued. "This allows for, I think, more nuance."
 
Instead of, for example, using old style propositional evangelism - "God loves you and has a very wonderful plan for your life; we've all sinned; Jesus was given to us as a way to move passed that sin; if we receive Him then we're able to enter into that plan" - evangelicals can go back to the Bible and develop a more "robust" and "fully biblical" type of evangelism, Teasdale explained.
 
"Jesus teaches yes, that we need to be forgiven for sins, no question about that. But Jesus also calls us to love our neighbor. Jesus also calls us to live in community with one another. And so I think that what the shift to postmodernity and finding meaning has done is open the door for evangelicals to find new and more robust and more fully biblical [evangelism], to be honest. To go back to the Bible and rediscover how much fuller the Gospel is that they're supposed to be living out and inviting others to share," he said.
 
Especially among more highly-educated Christians, the professor explained, there has been a lot of re-examination on the state of the American church, particularly in the era of President Donald Trump, who was largely supported by white evangelicals.
 
"I think the more educated folks that are in the evangelical camp are doing a lot of soul searching," he said.
 
Teasdale, who is also a fellow at the Billy Graham Center for Evangelism at Wheaton College, said he gets together with scholars at the institution about twice annually to share research. The discussions that have emerged about the meaning of the term "evangelical" since Trump's election, he said, have been "fascinating."
 
"Most of us are scholars who teach evangelism. We're all evangelical of some stripe or another. We discussed an awful lot. Can the term evangelical be used effectively anymore because it got so tainted? ... and it's not a matter of saying whether we agree with the core Gospel," he said.
 
A Minority Lens
 
Looking at ways Bible-believing Christians can better frame their narrative in a postmodern society, Teasdale suggested they would be better served by acknowledging themselves as minorities in American culture.
 
Related
 
Saying You're Going to Hell if You Don't Believe in Jesus Is 'Insanity,' Megachurch Pastor Michael A. Walrond Jr. Says
 
Christianity Is Not the Only Way to Heaven, Prominent Presbyterian Pastor Says
 
Pastor Greg Locke Slams Evangelicals Who Believe There Are Multiple Ways to Heaven
 
Michele Bachmann Apologizes for 'Ignorant' Remarks on Jews During Bible Study in Jerusalem
 
"I think the church in the United States needs to learn from the churches in the rest of the world and understand what it's like to be a minority religion. I think that one of the things that continues to afflict the church in the United States is the belief that we still hold the cultural authority that we did in the 19th century. And we don't and we haven't for quite a while," Teasdale said.
 
"We still have all these big buildings and we still have lots of people working within the institutional churches and I think that we don't realize the extent to which we've lost the cultural authority that we used to have.
 
"I think we would do well to learn from churches that have always been minorities in their cultures so that we understand the way that we would be more effective in approaching the rest of our culture in a way that promotes dialogue, in a way that promotes hospitality in a way that demonstrates our love but recognizes we are coming at it from a position that is a minority position."
 
When it comes to home-grown examples of ministry, Teasdale pointed to the black church and immigrant churches as good examples of Christians who have managed to remain faithful to Scripture despite the cultural shift.
 
"I think we can learn a lot from immigrant churches, from black churches and others that have had to be in a minority status already in the United States, have had to figure out how to operate within the larger cultural setting. I think the larger white mainline and white evangelical churches just are kind of clueless about the fact that we aren't in this cultural authority position anymore and we need to back off and learn how to be gracious in a minority position. I think we would be more effective that way," he said.
 
In addition to learning how to operate like a minority, Teasdale suggested that high-profile internal disagreements among Christian denominations also need to be handled more discreetly.
 
"We need to find a way to deal with our stuff and get passed that because we're hurting the larger witness of Christ not only by being in disagreement with each other but by vocally and visibly being in disagreement with each other. We won't always agree, I understand that. But we're doing it in such a bitter and petty way that people don't actually believe that we teach that God is love because we don't demonstrate it," Teasdale said.
 
___________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
 
 
___________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
 
 
 
 

  • 0

#288 grog

grog

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4005 posts

Posted 24 May 2018 - 04:13 PM

Are religion and science always at odds?
 
Here are three scientists that don't think so
 
 
 
 
 
May 24, 2018
 
 
 
 
 
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
Dylan O'Donnell standing on rock in front of sky full of stars.
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
What do you see when you gaze at the night sky? (Supplied: Dylan O'Donnell)
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
When you ponder the vastness of the universe, the wonder of the natural world, or the mysteries of consciousness, what are you left with?
 
Are you someone who sees nothing but a material world, the workings of which are just waiting to be discovered by the logical reasoning of science?
 
Or are you someone who believes there must be a creator, or at least some sort of divine power that gives meaning and purpose to it all?
 
Some argue that being religious is incompatible with being a scientist - but do they realise the father of the Big Bang theory was actually a Catholic priest, the pioneer of modern genetics was an Augustinian monk, or the decoder of the human genome converted from atheism to Christianity in his 20s?
 
Scientists these days may be less religious than the average person, but just over half of scientists surveyed in 2009 said they believed in some sort of deity or higher power.
 
Is the conflict between religion and science as deep as some think? We talk to three scientists about how they reconcile their faith with their work.
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
Image of an angel holding a placard with the word 'science' on it
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
How recent is the conflict between science and religion? (Getty Images: Pascal Deloche)
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
Dr Jennifer Wiseman: A Christian astrophysicist
 
As a child, Jennifer enjoyed late-night stargazing walks with her parents on their Arkansas farm in the US.
 
"The stars were incredible," she told Kumi Taguchi on ABC TV's Compass.
 
"We had dark, dark skies there. And I think I was always curious at that point as to what was out there and how could I explore it."
 
About that time NASA was sending the Voyager spacecraft to the outer planets of the solar system for the first time, and beaming back exotic pictures.
 
"I thought, you know, I'm going to be a part of that," Jennifer says.
 
She now spends her time using telescopes to study how stars and planets are made - and is credited with discovering the comet Wiseman-Skiff in 1987.
 
But the sense of wonder and curiosity Jennifer felt as a child, as she looked into the vast and magnificent night sky, has never left her.
 
"There are at least 200 billion stars in our own galaxy, and there are maybe 400 billion galaxies in our observable universe, each one of them with billions of stars," Jennifer says.
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
"Those of us who study astronomy can tell you the numbers and all of that, but comprehending it is something totally different."
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
While science is a "wonderful tool for understanding the physical universe", Jennifer says her religious beliefs give her the answers to the bigger philosophical questions in life - like how mere humans can be significant at all in the context of the universe.
 
"In Christian faith, our significance is basically given as a gift of love from God, who's responsible for the universe," she says.
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
Jennifer Wiseman
 
Jennifer Wiseman studies how stars and planets are made. (Supplied: World Science Festival)
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
"I think it's significant that we as human beings can actually investigate the universe, have a sense of our cosmic history, have a sense of our actual connection to the cosmos, and understand it. To me that's a gift.
 
"The fact that we're having this conversation is incredible, given that you and I both have atoms in our bodies that were forged in stars.
 
"So, we are physically connected to the universe and I think we have a deeper connection as well."
 
Meanwhile, Jennifer sees her scientific work as deepening her faith.
 
"God's responsible for everything. So, by studying more of nature you're … enriching your understanding of God," she says.
 
Jennifer suggests the public's fascination with images of the universe stems from a human desire for meaning.
 
"They're awestruck by it just as I am," she says.
 
"I think it's because there's something in us that wants to know the bigger picture … that there's something more to our existence than just our survival here on this planet."
 
The apparent conflict between science and religion is a relatively recent phenomenon, that's been "invigorated" by the media's need for drama, says Jennifer, who directs the program of Dialogue on Science, Ethics, and Religion for the American Association for the Advancement of Science.
 
"Interestingly, I don't hear much about this conflict idea in my daily work with scientists," she says.
 
"When I talk to people I find that most people really realise that there are deeper questions of life that science can't fully address, and they don't really see why there should be any conflict."
 
While some point to statements in the Bible as evidence Christianity is incompatible with science, Jennifer says the book has to be seen in its historical context.
 
"You have to look at biblical literature from the perspective of when it was written, the original audiences, the original languages, the original purposes … the message that was meant to be conveyed by it," she says.
 
"The Bible's not a science text."
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
Christian religious fundamentalist handing out leaflets in the main street at the ballyclare may fair
 
Fundamentalism is on the rise. (Getty Images: Joe Fox)
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
Dr Andrew Harman: A Buddhist immunologist
 
After finishing his undergraduate science degree in the UK, Andrew went travelling in South-East Asia and that's when he first discovered Buddhism.
 
"Oddly enough, it was in a Lonely Planet guide book," says Andrew, who was brought up a Christian.
 
"I was sitting on a very long bus journey in Laos and I was so bored I read the section at the beginning on Buddhism."
 
The impact on him was immediate: "It was just like a thunderbolt out of nowhere."
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
Andrew Harman
 
Andrew Harman studies the transmission of HIV. (Supplied: Andrew Harman)
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
And, as it turns out, this was no passing fad.
 
After rejecting Christianity at an early age, Andrew says he went through some "very nihilistic" teenage years.
 
"I believed when you die, that's the end, the lights go out and what's the point in it all?" he says.
 
"I think that led to a bit of a sense of meaninglessness in me."
 
Buddhism appealed because it was a religion that didn't require a "creator god".
 
"I didn't even realise that was an option."
 
In 2009 Andrew became an ordained Buddhist in the UK-founded Triratna Order.
 
Today he runs two labs at Westmead Institute for Medical Research in Sydney, where he studies the mechanism of sexual transmission of HIV and the immunology of Crohn's disease.
 
His official email signature not only includes his scientific credentials, but his spiritual name as well - Dh Shantideva. And he teaches meditation and mindfulness in his workplace.
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
Religious symbols
 
Over 50 per cent of US scientists surveyed in 2009 said they believed in a deity or higher power. (Getty Images: Godong)
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
Andrew is fascinated by cosmology - his favourite book is A Brief History of Time by Stephen Hawking - but he sees Buddhism as answering different kinds of questions to science.
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
"Science is about learning, Buddhism is about living."
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
Buddhism, Andrew says, is interested in "creating the conditions for enlightenment to arrive" - a state in which people feel "unconditional love, deep spiritual peace, completely free of inner conflict".
 
The trick, he says, is to understand and accept "the true nature of reality" and that attachment to things - like our youth, loved ones, jobs or money - is the source of suffering.
 
"We're psychologically dependent on things that, at any moment, could be taken away from us," he says.
 
"But they are all impermanent, so you will suffer if you depend on them."
 
For Andrew, religions that require "blind faith" in God are at odds with science.
 
"I don't see how you can be a scientist and believe in God, although several of my colleagues do.
 
"Science is about seeking truth and testing a hypothesis. I don't believe you can prove the existence of God."
 
By contrast, he sees Buddhism as "very compatible" with science.
 
"I think Buddhism and science are absolutely in tune with each other fundamentally," he says.
 
"They're both driven by the idea that you can't just believe something without any evidence.
 
"The Buddha was very clear that you follow a system of practice and only when you've experienced those things for yourself is your faith then justified - because it's a faith that is based on experience."
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
Buddha
 
Buddhists do not believe in a creator god. (Getty Images: Rodolfo Parulan Jr)
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
Andrew finds the Buddhist ideal of detachment as particularly useful in helping him to ride the ups and downs of scientific work.
 
Not being too attached to your own theories, he says, means you can be more open and sceptical, and less likely to succumb to dogma.
 
But, says Andrew, there are some clashes between Buddhism and the idea that we can be reduced to a bunch of particles, and that studying matter will ultimately explain the whole of our reality.
 
"There's still a very strong current in science that thinks everything can be broken down into bits and put back together," he says.
 
But science is changing, says Andrew.
 
"I think Einstein's theory of relativity and quantum theory show you can't reduce everything to the sum of its parts," he says.
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
Fahad Ali: A Muslim geneticist
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
Fahad first encountered religious resistance to scientific ideas in a junior high biology class in Bahrain, where Darwin's theory of evolution was deemed "fundamentally flawed".
 
"It was quite sad," says Fahad, who went out and bought a copy of Darwin's On the Origin of Species the next day.
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
Fahad Ali
 
Fahad Ali is involved in research using CRISPR to genetically modify plants (Supplied: Fahad Ali)
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
Fahad was brought up a Muslim. As a teenager, he read the Koran, but began to question the religious practices he saw around him, including the treatment of women.
 
At the same time, he was realising he was gay - something that put him at odds with most Muslims around him.
 
So, Fahad gave up his faith.
 
But after his mother was diagnosed with cancer he was left feeling a void, and was drawn back to Islam.
 
"Bad things happen all the time and I'd like to believe there's a bigger picture," says Fahad, now 24.
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
"We need a God because we need a sense of place and purpose and a sense of something beyond."
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
He says some of the tension between science and religion arises because people take the Koran and Bible literally.
 
A lot of people say "a lot of stupid things" in the name of religion but the opposite should be true, Fahad says.
 
Fahad's own approach to Islam includes a critical reading of the Koran.
 
"You need to be sceptical in order to be correct," he says.
 
"That rings true in both my research and in my faith."
 
He says in his reading, the Koran encourages "compassion, common decency, generosity and intelligence".
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
Muslim praying
 
Islamic scientists and philosophers played an important role in the development of science. (Getty Images: Chris Hondros)
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
Fahad is yet to complete his honours year but meanwhile has been assisting in research using CRISPR to streamline genetic modification in plants at The University of Sydney Institute of Agriculture.
 
While there are "big moral questions" about how to apply genetic modification, he believes it should be used to cure disease and increase food production.
 
"Science should be in the service of humanity," Fahad says.
 
And Fahad argues that unforgiving and extreme perspectives, whether they're based on faith or science, can be problematic.
 
"Reason and rationality in the Islamic world has been in crisis for decades," he says.
 
"There's not really any nice way to say this: people have lost their brains."
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
EXTERNAL LINK: Did you know that the physicist who laid the groundwork for the Big Bang theory was a Catholic priest?
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
He says fundamentalism is on the rise because "people need to grasp something because they can't make sense of their place in the world".
 
On the other hand, "militant atheists" like Richard Dawkins have "contributed to the idea that in order to be smart, you need to let go of religion".
 
"But that's patently false and I think a lot of people in the scientific community know that as well," he says.
 
"The entire state of what science is as a field today would not be the same without the contribution of Islamic scientists and thinkers and philosophers," says Fahad, pointing out that "algebra" is an Arabic word.
 
Fahad argues conflict also comes from people using God to explain things that science can't.
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
"God should not be made to stand in for scientific uncertainty.
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
"Science closes the gap, and then there's one less place for God to be found.
 
"Eventually God will vanish entirely - removed from the picture by science - and then people get aggressive and say science is wrong, which doesn't help anyone."
 
While some see evolutionary theory as threatening faith, Fahad disagrees.
 
"I think it's a testament to God more than anything - that we can bring about all life on earth from a single origin."
 
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
___________________________________________________________________________________

  • 0

#289 grog

grog

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4005 posts

Posted 24 May 2018 - 04:16 PM

9767872-3x2-thumbnail.jpg?v=7


  • 0

#290 Vanka Savolov

Vanka Savolov

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1128 posts

Posted 24 May 2018 - 04:26 PM

Some of such, as in the following link are not religious symbols... and when viewed, one gets a sense of chaos... which I think is the intent.

 

Religious symbols


  • 0

#291 grog

grog

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4005 posts

Posted 24 May 2018 - 05:02 PM

Famous atheist Richard Dawkins on the 'delusion' of religion
 
 
 
 
 
May 18, 2018
 
 
 
 
 
IN STUDIO WITH TOM ELLIOTT    
 
Richard Dawkins says the "solution" to eradicating religion from society is education.
 
The famous atheist joined Tom Elliott in studio on Friday, saying those who believed in a god were "deluded".
 
Click PLAY below to hear the full interview
 
 
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
 
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
 
 
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
 
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
 
 
 

  • 0

#292 grog

grog

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4005 posts

Posted 25 May 2018 - 01:58 PM

Atheist-turned-evangelist Lee Strobel shares the real-life miracle that shocked him
 
 
 
 
 
 
May 24, 2018
 
 
 
 
 
 
Author and evangelist Lee Strobel was once an atheist who served as the legal affairs editor for the Chicago Tribune before embarking on a quest to try and disprove Christianity - an effort that ironically led him to embrace faith.
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
(Read also: Columbine survivor's powerful lessons after facing terror)
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
Now, Strobel, whose personal story was told through the Pure Flix feature film, book and documentary titled "The Case for Christ," has released "The Case for Miracles," a new investigative book that relies on facts, interviews, and studies to further explore spiritual matters.
 
"It was really the miracle of the resurrection and the historical evidence for that that ended up bringing me to faith many years ago," Strobel told Pure Flix Insider and "The Billy Hallowell Podcast." "But my skepticism didn't go away."
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
Listen to Strobel describe his journey - and the most memorable miracle he's encountered - below:
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
Strobel said that he has long believed that Jesus performed the miracles described in the Gospels. That said, before writing "The Case for Miracles," Strobel was "ambivalent" about whether these miracles still happen today. Adding to that, he had some skepticism about some of the charlatans who have been exposed for making false claims about healings and the like.
 
"You just wonder … how legitimate are these miracle claims in the 21st century?" Strobel said. "And so that's kind of what prompted me to investigate this issue."
 
He encountered scores of healings and other claims of the miraculous along the way, but there was one case in particular that truly blew his mind: the case of Barbara Snyder.
 
Synder's miraculous healing, which unfolded more than 30 years ago, was apparently so shocking that even her doctors have written about her seemingly impossible medical turn-around.
 
"Barbara Snyder was diagnosed at the Mayo Clinic with multiple sclerosis. She deteriorated over a period of many years, several operations, many hospitalizations," Strobel explained. "It got to the point where she was dying. And, in fact, one doctor described her as being one of the most hopelessly ill patients he'd ever encountered."
 
Synder ended up in hospice care with a no-resuscitation order; she was nearly blind, her hands and body were curled and she had a tube in her throat to help her breath as well as a tube in her stomach to ensure proper nourishment. Meanwhile, her muscles were atrophied.
 
The situation was pretty hopeless - until something quite shocking happened.
 
"One day, one of her friends called WMBI, which is the radio station in Chicago run by the Moody Bible Institute, and said, 'Pray for Barbara. She's on her deathbed,'" Strobel explained. "So, we know that at least 450 Christians began praying for her, because they wrote letters saying, 'We're praying for you.'"
 
Then, on Pentecost Sunday, two of Synder's friends read her letters from those praying for her. As she listened, she said that she heard a male voice coming from the corner of the room - a voice she now believes was God.
 
"This male voice coming from the corner of the room where nobody was said, 'Get up my child and walk,'" Strobel recounted. "So she basically pulls the tube out of her throat, says, 'Go find my parents' [and] jumps out of bed."
 
Bizarrely, her calves were inflated and her once-atrophied muscles worked again - and that's not all. Her feet and fingers were suddenly straight and normal again. Her blindness, too, had been instantaneously healed.
 
(Read also: Are the Biblical End Times upon us?)
 
"This was an instantaneous healing of all of her symptoms and all of her illness to the point where … 31 years later she's completely healthy," Strobel said. "To this day."
 
There were plenty of other stories just like it, too.
 
Strobel went on to explain that he interviewed skeptics and believers, alike, and included their perspectives in "The Case for Miracles." At the end of the project, Strobel said he was shocked to learn that miracles are not only common, but also well-documented.
 
Likewise, Americans are quite prone to believing in the potential occurrence of miracles.
 
"Only 15 percent according to the polling that I did believe that miracles cannot happen today," Strobel said.
 
___________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
___________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

  • 0

#293 grog

grog

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4005 posts

Posted 31 May 2018 - 12:51 PM

The Bible forbids sex outside of marriage
 
 
 
 
 

  • 0

#294 grog

grog

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4005 posts

Posted 31 May 2018 - 01:10 PM

Atheist Women Demand Removal of Arkansas Ten Commandments Monument
 
 
 
 
 
 

  • 0

#295 shaktiman

shaktiman

    Registered User

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 11111 posts

Posted 31 May 2018 - 01:36 PM

Early Draft Of The Bible Discovered; Experts Say It Proves Bible Is 'Fiction'

 

 

Anybody home upstairs grog?


  • 0

#296 MirrorMan

MirrorMan

    Registered User

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 8467 posts

Posted 01 June 2018 - 08:47 AM

 


  • 0

#297 MirrorMan

MirrorMan

    Registered User

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 8467 posts

Posted 01 June 2018 - 08:56 AM

The Bible says that pi = 3. That's a problem given that Biblical texts are trying to convince the reader that it is the word of God. It would have been very straightforward for God to have specified a lot more decimals of pi such that people could verify some of that already thousands of years ago. Every time a new decimal was computed using clumsy methods a long time the Biblical value would have been found  to be correct. And later with more advanced mathematical methods when a lot more decimals could be computed, these would all match the value written down in the Bible.


Edited by MirrorMan, 01 June 2018 - 08:57 AM.

  • 0




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Copyright © 2018 Pravda.Ru