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Early Draft Of The Bible Discovered; Experts Say It Proves Bible Is 'Fiction'

The Bible Book Of Revelation

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#41 grog

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Posted 12 March 2018 - 03:05 PM

The Knights Templar, Baphomet, and the Horned Skull
 
 
 
 
AUGUST 5, 2007
 
 
 
 
 
f1b389c6fbc54bcd34a2c14368a3bc7e6b5d050c
 
 
700 years ago, an esoteric order of warrior monks, originally created to protect pilgrims travelling to the Holy Land were brutally wiped out by the French king, Philippe the Fair. In a bloody coup, most of the order including its grand master James of Morlay, were arrested.
 
Over the next seven years, the Templars were tortured by the inquisition into making false confessions of heresy, blasphemy and idolatry. This allowed the monarchy and papacy to unite in denouncing the order as devil-worshiping Satanists. One claim that seems to have been made repeatedly about the Templars is that they venerated a mysterious idol named Baphomet, but who, or what was Baphomet?
 
For two hundred years this highly secretive military group had operated from an extensive network of castles throughout Europe and the Middle East. They had both supported and been supported by a succession of Popes and monarchs, and held a unique position in medieval Europe, having been declared exempt from paying taxes and seemingly operating above the law.
 
During their relatively short existence, the Templars were said to have amassed immense wealth, possessing considerable assets in gold, land and property, which made them a popular source of financing amongst European nobility. Quite by accident they had become the worlds first international bankers; until that is, their organisation was destroyed by a greedy French king who thought that by destroying the Templars as an organisation, he would take possession of their wealth and the mysterious secret they were known to guard so closely.
 
As it was, at least some of the Templars were tipped off of the impending coup, one, Gerard de Villiers arranged for several galleons to be loaded with the Templars assets. Days before the fateful raid on Friday the thirteenth, 1307, the Templar fleet sailed from La Rochelle in Western France, half the ships allegedly heading for Scotland and the other for Portugal. Phillip was left empty handed and de Villiers, the highest ranking Templar to escape the witch hunt, simply vanished, as did the treasure, leaving Philippe nothing to seize but a handful of Knights in the Paris headquarters who had seemingly sacrificed themselves for what they must have considered to be the greater good.
 
By a strange twist of fate, nearly five hundred years later the French monarchy would meet its own end in that same Templar building, as the Paris Temple was where Louis XVI and his family were held prior to their execution.
 
A secret that has never been broken
 
In addition to their wealth, the Templars were also said to possess hidden knowledge; a powerful secret that had been discovered during the nine years the founding members spent excavating Temple Mount in Jerusalem.
 
There has been much speculation since their demise as to whether the mysterious secret that the Templars were said to possess was the source of their riches or something completely unrelated to their wealth. It is quite possible that the reason the Templar fleet sailed in two directions was a strategic one, separating the Templar wealth from the Templars mysterious secret.
 
Many commentators have pointed out that the Templars wealth came from donations, tax exemptions, spoils of war and money lending enterprises. Popular legends lean towards more exotic explanations as to what they had found, such as their having discovered the Holy Grail, Solomons treasure or the Ark of the Covenant, however there is little evidence to support those claims.
 
The Head of God
 
Author Keith Laidler suggests in his book The Head of God that the Templars actually found the embalmed head of Christ. It was this head that according to Laidler, the Templars supposedly worshipped as Baphomet. Indeed one of the admissions extracted under torture was that they did indeed worship a head that they considered sacred. Considered in isolation that claim has little merit, however at Rosslyn Chapel in Scotland, the location many believe houses the Templars treasure, an inscription on the so-called apprentice pillar reads, Here beneath this pillar lies the head of God. What exactly is this head of God? The public location of the inscription suggests that it is not physical wealth that is buried beneath Rossyln, but something with no tangible monetary value possibly a unique artefact of some description, something very special that had to be preserved.
 
There are two theories as to what exactly Baphomet was; the first is that Baphomet was the mysterious head that the Templars were said to worship, and the second is that Baphomet was a horned creature, loosely described as part man part goat, evidence of this creature can be found on several Templar buildings.
 
Carvings found on several medieval churches clearly show a horned creature with wings and a beard, which is a strange form of decoration for the self-proclaimed protectors of Christianity to use. Some researchers have suggested that rather than representing a demon the creature appears to be part man, part angel and that the horns may be symbolic of divinity and of a connection to God.
 
Furthermore, the carving suggest that the two theories, first that the Templars worshiped a head named Baphomet, and second that Baphomet was the horned creature depicted on so many of their churches, are two parts of the same truth. The Knights Templar worshipped a horned skull and that skull was Baphomet.
 
Is it possible that the founding Templars venerated a horned skull that they had discovered beneath Temple Mount? This horned skull was to all intents and purposes the head of God.
 
Whilst the idea of a horned skull might sound far-fetched, at least one such skull is known to exist in France, the home of the Templars. The precise origins of the skull are unknown, however those who have had the opportunity to examine it, state that it is authentic. There are also written accounts of other horned skulls, some allegedly belonging to a tall race of people that we would class as giants, being discovered in the US. This evidence from the US goes some way to validating the existence of the French skull. (See the resources list for more details) A similar horned figure, thought to be Asmodeus the demon of lust who helped Solomon build his temple, can be found in the church at Rennes le Chateau, in France. Rennes le Chateau is itself a location steeped in traditions of secret societies, occult symbolism, unexplained wealth and pentagonal geometry.
 
Clues in the Old Testament
 
Historians know that when the nine founding members undertook their excavation of Temple Mount they sought the assistance of Jewish Rabbis to translate Hebrew versions of the Old Testament rather than relying on their own Latin translations. In addition, the Templars were said to have studied many other ancient Hebrew texts. The popular explanation for this is that the Templars believed that the Hebrew texts contained hidden clues as to the whereabouts of the treasure concealed below Temple Mount; they obviously wanted to ensure that no fine details had been lost in the translation to Latin.
 
The Old Testament and texts such as the Book of Enoch do of course make several references to creatures such as the Nephilim, fallen angels and even horned men. According to some biblical legends, God marked his chosen followers with horns. Lamech for example realised he had killed his ancestor Cain, when his son told him his victim was a horned man. The horn or horns were said to be the mark of God. If the Templars did indeed find a horned skull buried beneath Temple Mount it is easy to see how they would reach the conclusion that they had discovered the remains of one of Gods original chosen men, one that predated Christ himself. Clearly this is something that the all powerful Catholic church would have been very unhappy with to say the least; it was a find that was too precious to ignore, but one that would put them at odds with the Catholic church itself and endanger their very existence.
 
Solomons Seal
 
Another symbol that features prominently in the Templar architecture and acts as a core symbol for the order is the pentagram; the symbol used as the seal of Jerusalem. The pentagram is often found on Templar gravestones like the one on the left. The facade of the Church of Santa Maria do Olival which houses the famous pantheon where 22 Master Templars were buried is marked by a pentagram balanced with an enormous rosette. In a guidebook, this symbol is referred to as the "Signum Salmonis, the true mark of the Knights Templars". Whether the fact that there are 22 Templar masters buried in Portugal is simply coincidence or whether there is an esoteric correlation between that and the 22 letters of the Hebrew letters, which according to the Kabbalistic text, the Sepher Yetzirah, were the origins of creation, and the 22 Master Templars is unknown; but might hint at the importance of the site and explain why when one fleet sailed to Scotland, the other was said to have headed for Portugal.
 
Dangerous Knowledge
 
The connections between the Templars and the number 22 also reveal themselves in the Atbrash Cipher. This is a common cabbalistic substitution cipher, where the 22 letters of Hebrew alphabet are laid out twice in opposite directions, each letter from the top row substituting for one on the lower. According to Dr. Hugh Schonfield, a respected Dead Sea Scrolls scholar, using this system the name Baphomet when written in Hebrew yields the name Sophia, the Gnostic goddess of wisdom.
 
The etymology Baphomet is uncertain; some sources suggest that in Arabic, Aramaic and Hebrew it translates as bet' amet, or place of truth. The root ba or bet is also very interesting as it is the same as the ba in Baal, meaning Lord. It is also likely to be linked to the meaning of Baal Shem the Masters of the Divine name. Additionally, according to legend, Bat Khol was the daughter of the Divine voice essentially the oracle of the Divine.
 
It seems possible that the Templars may have chosen the name Baphomet for the mysterious head that they worshipped because it represented a hidden and ancient source of divine knowledge. It was this knowledge that the Catholic Church may have struggled to integrate into their worldview and quite likely it would have been information that would have been suppressed by the church. In many ways Baphomet was a bitter sweet knowledge, one that promised the Templars a unique connection with God, a potential understanding of the truth but which would have placed them on a direct collision course with the Vatican, because no organisation could be closer to God than the Vatican and in particular, the pope.
 
Did the Templars really find a horned skull beneath Temple Mount? If they did it would certainly explain the horned symbolism of Baphomet that was incorporated into so many of their religious or semi-religious buildings. Baphomet may have represented physical proof of the legitimacy of the Old Testament and of Divine intervention in the affairs of man. A horned skull, something concealed within ancient biblical texts would represent the ultimate prize for an order such as the Templars, it would unite their dual quests for spiritual enlightenment and their duty as defenders of Christianity, but it is unlikely to have been accepted by the church; perhaps that explains why Baphomet is shrouded in such secrecy. - source
 
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#42 Atossa

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Posted 12 March 2018 - 03:24 PM




ALL of you atheist jew/nwo jew-bolshevik red army trolls on Pravda share the same evil demented antichrist hive mind. All of you relish demonizing Biblical Christianity. The question is... WHY does a supposed revived "Christian Russia" [Pravda forum is an .ru site] tolerate you evil antichrist jew/nwo jew-bolshevik blasphemous JEW demons ??

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#43 grog

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Posted 15 March 2018 - 05:29 PM

The Knights Templar - Example #1

 

 

c96418e7726447367c897c598b57d1f6--knight


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#44 grog

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Posted 15 March 2018 - 05:33 PM

The Knights Templar - Example #2

 

 

costume-cloak-of-the-knights-templar-%5B


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#45 grog

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Posted 15 March 2018 - 05:37 PM

The Knights Templar - Example #3

 

 

63fec4bef2bb952056e79271b7316f86--milita


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#46 grog

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Posted 15 March 2018 - 05:41 PM

The Knights Templar - Example #4

 

 

23440381670_3365b4b476_b.jpg


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#47 grog

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Posted 27 March 2018 - 01:27 PM

Atheist group says it will offer alternative 'In God We Trust' signs to Florida schools
 
 
 
 
March 26, 2018
 
 
 
 
An atheist group in Florida has offered to provide its own version of "In God We Trust" signs to the state's public schools after legislators passed a law mandating the motto be on display.
 
One version of the sign proposed by the group, Atheists of Florida, would also include a line from the First Amendment, the Tampa Bay Times reported on Monday.
 
"We want to help educate about the First Amendment and the establishment clause, as well as about the diversity in our country," the group's executive director, Judy Adkins, told the Times.
 
The group hopes to offset the cost of the new requirement, which would not be funded by the state legislature, but also highlight diversity, according to Adkins.
 
That version of the sign would also include the phrase "E Pluribus Unum. Out of many, one" in a circle of American red, white and blue stars and stripes, as well as the line from the First Amendment: "Congress shall make no law respecting the establishment of religion or prohibiting the free exercise thereof."
 
Other drafts of the sign would include pictures of Jesus, Buddha, Odin and other gods.
 
"We know they're talking about the Christian God," Adkins told the news outlet. "But we also know there's a diverse population in the Florida school system that have other gods, or no gods."
 
Adkins hopes the school system accepts the group's offer.
 
"We very much support the public school system and want to help in any way we can," Adkins wrote to the superintendents, according to the Times.
 
Last month, the Florida state House passed a bill that would require public schools to display "In God We Trust" in a "conspicuous place" in each building used by public school boards.
 
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#48 grog

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Posted 27 March 2018 - 02:30 PM

Tapper quotes Bible passage in response to pro-Trump pastor who criticized Stormy Daniels
 
 
 
 
 
March 27, 2018
 
 
 
 
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Takeaways from Stormy Daniels's "60 Minutes" interview
 
Autoplay: On | Off
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CNN's Jake Tapper responded with a Bible passage after a pastor who supports President Trump criticized Stormy Daniels in a tweet.
 
"The funny thing is @realDonaldTrump is still the President and she's still a hooker. #StormyDanielsDay," Pastor Greg Locke, the founder of the Global Vision Bible Church in Tennessee, tweeted.
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In response, Tapper sent out a series of tweets quoting a Bible passage.
 
"Luke 7: 37 A woman in that town who lived a sinful life learned that Jesus was eating at the Pharisee's house, so she came there with an alabaster jar of perfume. As she stood behind him at his feet weeping, she began to wet his feet with her tears," Tapper tweeted.
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Locke later responded to Tapper, calling it a "great passage" and accusing the CNN anchor of hating his "support of Trump."
 
"He changed her life by love and grace. She didn't continue living in it and then get on national television to garner more attention for her nonsense. Context is key. The fact is, you hate my support of Trump w/out a Bible," Locke tweeted.
 
Tapper shot back, saying he has "complete indifference" to his feelings about any politician.
 
"But you might want to reconsider a refresher course. Hint: the passage is not 'hey, go throw stones!'" Tapper tweeted.
 
Locke has in the past spurred controversy over posts on social media. He has been critical of media organizations in the past and has praised Trump.
 
The exchange came after "60 Minutes" on Sunday aired its highly anticipated interview with Daniels, during which the adult film star revealed details about the affair she claims she had with Trump more than a decade ago.
 
Daniels, whose real name is Stephanie Clifford, said she decided to speak publicly about the alleged affair because she felt she needed to defend herself and her family from legal and public scrutiny.
 
She said she felt compelled to set the record straight after a Wall Street Journal article revealed she had been paid $130,000 by Trump's personal lawyer Michael Cohen, reportedly to keep quiet about the alleged affair.
 
Daniels filed a lawsuit earlier this month seeking to void the nondisclosure agreement, which her lawyer claims is invalid because it was never signed by Trump himself.
 
Trump's lawyers have argued in subsequent court documents that Daniels repeatedly violated the nondisclosure agreement, and could be forced to pay $20 million in damages.
 
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#49 LebenUndLieben

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Posted 27 March 2018 - 02:51 PM

Why does anyone care what he did or did not do with that gal?

I hope the  best for both of them, and wish everyone would shut their mouths & fingers and stop all the vicious gossip.

I liked Monica Lewinsky too.

Such stupid nit picky people busy yapping about such irrelevant details. These nitpickers are like blood sucking lice causing irritation.

If she wants to alter the deal, He should counter offer & compromise until they come to agreement. He's done it before, He can do it again.

 

Regarding Templars as per Grog's posts:

The mere fact that the Vatican tortures people into confession of "crimes", proves the prosecutor to be criminal.


Edited by LebenUndLieben, 27 March 2018 - 03:00 PM.

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#50 Atossa

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Posted 27 March 2018 - 03:19 PM


That version of the sign would also include the phrase "E Pluribus Unum. Out of many, one"





The irony of that US motto... originally the "many" were Aryan Christian Europeans.

But now it aptly describes globalist racial, religious, cultural melting pot jew/nwo Babylon the Great, mother of whores and abominations of the earth.

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#51 Atossa

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Posted 27 March 2018 - 03:20 PM


I liked Monica Lewinsky too.





Why do you like that JEW ??

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#52 LebenUndLieben

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Posted 27 March 2018 - 03:32 PM

I can like anyone's positive attributes and actions. Their faults are a separate issue.

i like Atossa's persistence and attention to detail, and any other virtues & beauties she may have, even if I were to dislike some other aspect.

One should be fair (accurate) & respect even one's enemies, even in deadly struggle.


Edited by LebenUndLieben, 27 March 2018 - 03:39 PM.

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#53 grog

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Posted 28 March 2018 - 02:58 PM

COURT DEPRIVES CHRISTIAN INMATE OF BIBLE
 
 
 
 
 
March 24, 2018
 
 
 
 
 
Appealing to U.S. Supreme Court over First Amendment rights
 
A court ruling that deprived a Christian prison inmate of a Bible is being challenged as a violation to the First Amendment.
 
Conraad Hoever, held in Florida's Franklin Correctional Institution, was placed in solitary confinement in 2013 for "disrespecting" a prison guard, and he asked to have a Bible with him.
 
Hoever, who "believes that he is called to study the Bible daily and that these daily devotionals prevent him from falling from grace," had asked for one of the three Bibles he already owned.
 
The prison refused, only to relent and give him a Spanish-language Bible, which he could not read. Hoever then sued and lost in the courts.
 
Now, organizations that work with the three Abrahamic faiths have joined in a brief asking the U.S. Supreme Court to review the case.
 
"This case is about so much more than just one prisoner's right to read a Bible. It's about recognizing that in a prison state or police state, which is what we now have, there is no difference between the treatment meted out to a law-abiding citizen and a convicted felon: both are equally suspect and treated as criminals, without any of the special rights and privileges reserved for the governing elite," said constitutional attorney John W. Whitehead, president of The Rutherford Institute.
 
Whitehead's organization works with a wide range of faith traditions, often representing Christians, and he was joined by the Muslim Advocates and National Council of Jewish Women in the filing.
 
"At a time when America's prison population is growing, laws criminalizing the most mundane activities are on the rise, states have a financial incentive to keep private prisons at capacity, and the courts are inclined to side with law enforcement in matters of security, we would do well to keep in mind that whatever treatment is meted out to 'the least of these' in our society is no different from how the rest of us will eventually be treated. In the government's eyes, we are all prisoners of the American police state," Whitehead said.
 
The request explains: "For many faiths, certain observances are important but not mandatory. In a free exercise case, a plaintiff must establish that the government imposed a burden on a religious practice. The court of appeals furthered confusion in the lower courts by holding that only interference with a practice mandated by an incarcerated person's faith can burden the incarcerated person's right to the free exercise of religion."
 
The question, the filing argues, is whether federal law allows an inmate to recover compensatory damages against prison officials who violate the First Amendment.
 
It states that Hoever, "who is Christian, was denied such a 'reasonable opportunity' to practice his religion. Prison officials refused petitioner's request for an English-language Christian Bible during his time in solitary … providing him instead with only a Spanish-language Bible he could not read."
 
The lower court's decision to throw out the case needs review, the brief contends, because it "fails to protect the petitioner's religious freedom."
 
The three groups said they take no position on the underlying criminal conviction but pointed out that the lower court ruling requires "state actors to make religious decisions" on what is mandatory and what is not.
 
Consequently, prisons could ban any religious activity that they considered "non-mandatory."
 
In fact, they could go further.
 
"Requiring a showing of mandatory practices may exclude not only certain religious practices, but entire religions. Under a construction of the Free Exercise Clause that protects only mandatory religious practices, religions that lack the concepts of commandments necessary for the salvation of the soul would find themselves outside the scope of the First Amendment protection altogether."
 
Rutherford's joint filing explained: "During the 26 days that Hoever spent in solitary confinement, he was unable to exercise his right to practice his Christian faith by reading the Bible." But, they said, "even non-mandatory religious practices are protected from infringement by the First Amendment and that prisoners, particularly those who practice minority religions, are in danger of being cut off from engaging in many spiritual practices they need to sustain them through incarceration."
 
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#54 Ivan88

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Posted 28 March 2018 - 04:31 PM

Neither Conraad Hoever, nor any American has a right to read any Bible, because Congress outlawed it in 1991. They are gradually applying the Noahide code, to us.  The head chopping in Syria by US backed terrorists is 100% Noahide code being applied to Syria, the foundation stones & rootstock of Christian Israel nations the world over.

The reason they want to dis-arm the American People is because they want to do to Americans what they have been doing to Syrians.


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#55 grog

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Posted 29 March 2018 - 11:17 AM

Here’s why atheists have to fight for their rights
 
 
  
 
 
March 28, 2018
 
 
 
 
 
“You atheists are just taking on the mantle of victimhood. There are laws protecting you — especially the First Amendment. Therefore, you’re not really discriminated against. And it’s ridiculous for you to claim that you are.”
 
Atheist activists get this one a lot. When we speak out about ways that anti-atheist bigotry plays out, we’re told that we’re not really oppressed. We’re told that, because we have legal protection, because anti-atheist discrimination is illegal, therefore we don’t really have any problems, and we’re just trying to gain unearned sympathy and win the victim Olympics. (I’d love to hear Bob Costas do the commentary for that!) It’s a classic Catch-22: If we speak out about oppression and point to examples of it, we’re accused of “playing the victim card,” and the oppression becomes invisible. And if we don’t speak out about oppression … then the oppression once again becomes invisible.
 
If you’ve ever made this “discrimination against atheists is against the law” argument, I have some really bad news for you. You may want to sit down for this, it may come as a shock:
 
People sometimes break the law.
 
Theft is against the law — but people sometimes steal. Bribery is against the law — but people sometimes bribe other people. Arson is against the law — but people sometimes set buildings on fire.
 
Anti-atheist discrimination is against the law; in the United States, anyway. But people still sometimes discriminate against atheists.
 
It’s illegal for public schools to prevent students from viewing atheist Web sites, while allowing them to look at religious ones. But the San Antonio Independent School District did it anyway.
 
It’s illegal to make atheists swear religious oaths when they testify in court. But the U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Florida in Fort Myers did it anyway.
 
It’s illegal for the U.S. military to spend money evangelizing to U.S. soldiers, to demand that U.S. soldiers attend chapel, or to order U.S. soldiers to take a “spiritual fitness” test and order them to visit evangelizing chaplains when they fail it. But the U.S. military did it anyway.
 
It’s illegal for businesses to give church-goers discounts they don’t give to non-believers. But the Fisherman’s Quarters II restaurant in Asheville, N.C. did it anyway.
 
It’s illegal to deny atheist organizations the right to advertise in venues where religious groups advertise regularly. But when American Atheists and the NEPA Freethought Society tried to place a bus ad in Pennsylvania that simply had the word, “atheists,” with the names and URLs of the organizations in smaller type, the transit system rejected the ad because it was “too controversial.”
 
It’s illegal to deny atheist students in public high schools the right to organize clubs. But it happens all the time. Talk to Secular Student Alliance high school specialist JT Eberhard. He spends a ridiculous amount of his working day pushing high school administrations to stop throwing up illegal roadblocks to atheist students, and to let them have the clubs they’re legally allowed to have.
 
And the list goes on, and on, and on.
 
Talk to the Freedom From Religion Foundation, or Americans United for Separation of Church and State, or the National Center for Science Education, or the Military Religious Freedom Foundation, or American Atheists. Ask them about the lawsuits they’re filing every month — heck, every week — about public school prayers, bible instruction in public schools, public schools’ promotion of faith and religious activities as “developmental assets,” government displays of the Ten Commandments and other religious texts, city council meetings and other government events being opened with prayers, religious creationism being taught in the public schools, or any of hundreds of similar incidents.
 
And then tell me — or any other atheist — that we don’t experience discrimination.
 
Getting anti-discrimination laws and court rulings is hugely important for any marginalized group. But it’s only a first step. After that, you typically have to play a decades-long game of Whack-A-Mole, in which violations of the law pop up in local venues all over the country, and have to be smacked down again, and again, and again. That’s true of sex discrimination, racial discrimination and sexual orientation discrimination in states where that’s illegal. To give just one example among zillions: It’s illegal for banks to discriminate in lending practices on the basis of race… and yet Wells Fargo just settled a $175 million lawsuit over charging higher fees and rates on housing loans to racial minorities. Not in 1946, not in 1969 — in the last decade, in the years 2004 to 2009. It’s illegal to do that. It’s been illegal to do that for decades. They did it anyway. The mere existence of anti-discrimination laws is no guarantee that those laws will be obeyed.
 
So yes. Anti-atheist discrimination is illegal in the United States — and it happens anyway. I know. I haz a sad. And I’m going to have to hit you with even more bad news:
 
Standing up for your legal rights sometimes has ugly consequences.
 
Ask Jessica Ahlquist. High school student and atheist Jessica Ahlquist fought a legal battle she never should have had to fight: the battle to get her public, taxpayer-paid high school to take down a prayer banner from the auditorium. From a purely legal perspective, this was an utterly non-controversial issue: decades of legal precedent clearly supported her position, and to anyone familiar with the law, the ruling in her favor was almost entirely unsurprising.
 
But as a result of filing this lawsuit, Ahlquist was bullied, ostracized and threatened with violence. She was called “evil” in public by her state representative, and was targeted with multiple threats of brutal violence, rape and death. And this wasn’t just from hateful strangers trolling on the Internet — it came from her own schoolmates and her own community. This wasn’t in the Bible Belt — it was in Rhode Island.
 
And Ahlquist is hardly alone. When atheist student Damon Fowler tried to stop his public high school from having an illegal prayer at his graduation, he was physically threatened, publicly demeaned by one of his teachers, pilloried and ostracized by his community, and kicked out of his home by his parents. When atheist student Skyler Curtis tried to publicize his group at his high school, his posters were torn down, the local newspaper ran a letter from a parent calling his atheism an “atrocity,” and he received threats of violence. When atheist John Kieffer protested prayers at his local school board meeting, he was arrested.
 
Not everyone is able to fight these fights. Not everyone is able to risk hateful ostracism and violent threats from their community. It’s hard enough for a 16-year-old high school student like Jessica Ahlquist to face down this kind of venomous hostility. It’s even harder when you’re trying to hold down a job and support your family, and you literally can’t afford to alienate your bosses and co-workers and customers. Yes, the law is mostly on our side, and atheists and church-state separation advocates generally win these lawsuits. (Although not always — more on that in a tic.) But it doesn’t do much good to have the law on your side if fighting a legal battle is going to destroy your life.
 
And I have yet another piece of shocking news for you. I know, the terrible news just keeps on coming:
 
Sometimes laws aren’t enforced.
 
To give just one appalling example: It is — or it should be — illegal to deny custody to atheist parents, purely and explicitly on the basis of their atheism. And yet this happens, again and again and again. It has happened in states including Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Arkansas, Louisiana, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, and Texas. According to Eugene Volokh of The Volokh Conspiracy, “In 2001, for instance, the Mississippi Supreme Court upheld an order giving a mother custody partly because she took the child to church more often than the father did, thus providing a better ‘future religious example.’ In 2000, it ordered a father to take the child to church each week, as a [lower] Mississippi court ordered… reasoning that ‘it is certainly to the best interests of [the child] to receive regular and systematic spiritual training.'”
 
Try to imagine a judge in this country denying or limiting custody to parents, explicitly and specifically, because they were Jewish. Because they were Mormon. Because they were Baptist. And now, try to imagine a judge in this country denying or limiting custody to a parent, explicitly and specifically because she’s an atheist. You don’t have to imagine it. This is real. This happens.
 
It is illegal. Or it should be. But custody laws vary greatly from state to state — and family court is something of a special case, where judges have far more leeway than they do in other courts. So this is a very, very difficult legal battle to fight. The laws against it exist — but they are very difficult to enforce.
 
And finally, I have one last piece of earth-shattering news that will almost certainly shake your worldview to its foundations:
 
Not all bigotry is illegal.
 
The fact that atheists are the least-trusted group in America? Totally screwed-up — and totally legal. The fact that atheists are the minority group Americans least want their children to marry? Totally screwed-up — and totally legal. The fact that only 54 percent of Americans think atheists could share their vision of society? Totally screwed-up — and totally legal. The fact that only 54 percent of Americans would vote for an atheist for president — a lower number than any other group? Totally screwed-up — and totally legal. People have the legal right to not vote for an atheist… just like they have the legal right to not vote for a woman, or an African American, or a Muslim, or a Jew. It’s still discrimination. It’s still screwed-up.
 
And it’s still worth fighting.
 
Plus, of course, all of this is just in the United States, where we do have a Constitution that ostensibly gives us the legal right to not be religious. In much of the world, the situation for atheists is far worse. In much of the world, it is literally against the law to be an atheist, and to say so, and to say anything critical of religion. To give just one example of many: In Indonesia, atheist Alexander Aanwas beaten by a mob, arrested, convicted, and sentenced to over two years in prison — for stating his atheism on Facebook. (There is currently a petition to the White House, asking President Obama to speak out about the Alexander Aan case and call on the Indonesian government to correct this gross violation of human rights.)
 
Is anti-atheist bigotry as bad as homophobia or racism, misogyny or transphobia? No. Almost certainly not. Not in the U.S., anyway. It’s worse in some ways — we consistently show up in polls as the least trusted group in America, and the least likely to be voted for — but atheists don’t seem to be subject to the same level of physical violence as gay or trans people, or the same level of economic oppression as women or people of color.
 
That’s not the point. Here is the point.
 
If you were mugged, nobody would tell you, “Quit whining — there are laws against mugging, you have legal protection, you don’t have anything to complain about.” The fact that there are laws against mugging did not stop you from getting mugged. It is reasonable for you to say something about it, and to express distress that it happened. And if muggings are happening a lot in your town or your country, it is reasonable to ask your community to pay attention, and to do something about it.
 
Atheists are getting mugged. Atheists are experiencing real, law-breaking discrimination. The fact that it’s illegal does not always stop it from happening. It is reasonable for us to speak out about it. And it is reasonable for us to expect people to give a damn. It is reasonable to expect our friends, our families, our colleagues, our communities, our country, to pay attention — and to do something about it.
 
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#56 grog

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Posted 29 March 2018 - 12:55 PM

Don't 'Bible-bash' sex workers‚ says religious expert
 
 
 
 
 
 
March 29, 2018
 
 
 
 
 
 
Don't use the Bible to bash the sex industry.
 
That was the plea from University of KwaZulu-Natal lecturer‚ gender activist and theologian Patricia Bongiwe Zengele‚ who has called on the religious sector to give sex workers a break.
 
Zengele‚ who has been a social worker for 30 years‚ was speaking during a public discussion on sex work in South Africa and its implications such as sexual violence and public health at the university's Howard College in Durban on Wednesday.
 
She told the audience that commercial sex work was a very old industry but religion was one of those institutions that frowned on the industry.
 
"Religion is one of those institutions that frown against sex work and we are so judgemental and sometimes we even use the [religious] text to bash people who are in this industry.
 
"But I want to differ. I would say commercial sex work is a very old industry. It's not new. But what I think is important in the field of activism is that we need to open up doors and engage. We are living in a democratic country and in this country people's rights are observed and respected.
 
"So if the minority groups like sex workers are eager to come and say 'we also want our rights to be protected‚ why are we being judged by the nature of the work that we are doing?'‚ I am not here to judge but I think the religious sector must stop to judge‚" she said.
 
Zengele castigated religious people for using the Bible to bash the sex industry. She cited an example from the Bible when a woman was brought before Jesus by the Pharisees.
 
"When the Pharisees told Jesus that the Law of Moses commanded them to stone such women‚ Jesus said: 'Let anyone of you who is without sin be the first to throw a stone at her.' They all walked away.
 
"Jesus spoke directly to the woman who had offended and then there was compassion. So I am coming here to say the sex work industry is demanding from the religious sector compassion. Let's talk and let's hear one another. "
 
She said the money earned by sex workers was no different from anyone else.
 
"I'm telling you from the pulpit that we need to correct these things from the pulpit because people in the pulpit are also clients of sex workers. We need to look at the economic situation that we're facing and is pushing us into a corner to live in a different way. Let's create spaces and find one another before judgement.
 
"Stigma alienates us and we're becoming so judgemental to one another and I say it from the pulpit‚ if we have to preach the messages of support‚ love‚ forgiveness‚ we're preaching embracing whoever comes with non-judgemental attitude‚" said Zengele.
 
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#57 Traveler

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Posted 29 March 2018 - 06:51 PM

And so the twists and deceptions continue. What is really happening is that we are entering the time known as the Great Tribulation, anything and everything associated with God and Christ are going to be attacked and distorted. After all you can hardly have an anti-christ rise to power in a society that is strongly Christian can you ? The only problem is that this is not going to be a short sprint to the end but a long drawn out marathon.


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#58 RobertD

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Posted 29 March 2018 - 08:01 PM

And so the twists and deceptions continue. What is really happening is that we are entering the time known as the Great Tribulation, anything and everything associated with God and Christ are going to be attacked and distorted. After all you can hardly have an anti-christ rise to power in a society that is strongly Christian can you ? The only problem is that this is not going to be a short sprint to the end but a long drawn out marathon.


The antichrist already rules the planet and have been doing so for 6000yrs. The one who will rise is the righteous king whose right it is to rule the world. To him is the obedience of nations and to him is the eternal kingdom. After the son of God Jesus of course.
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#59 Hellboy

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Posted 29 March 2018 - 08:12 PM

I wanted to see if a young Jewish Monica Lewinsky would have anything about her

that people could like so I looked at images and .... nope. She's as repulsive as humanly

possible even at a young age.

 

8234a729374124ad816757a123b74ae7.jpg

 

Look at these two jokers. 

 

 

..


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#60 grog

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Posted 13 April 2018 - 10:46 AM

ACLU sues on behalf of atheist who opposed 'In God We Trust' display
 
 
 
 
 
 
April 13, 2018
 
 
 
 
 
 
Atheist activist speaks out against 'In God We Trust' motto
 
St. Louis suburb residents rallied to support display of 'In God We Trust' motto in city council chambers; a woman from a neighboring town explains on 'The Ingraham Angle' why she is against displaying the motto.
 
A self-proclaimed atheist who was recently removed from a city council meeting in Missouri after objecting to an "In God We Trust" display is now getting some help from the ACLU.
 
The American Civil Liberties Union's Missouri chapter announced a lawsuit Thursday, claiming that officials in Wentzville, a St. Louis suburb, violated Sally Hunt's First Amendment rights.
 
Hunt, of Maryland Heights, was forcibly removed from the Feb. 14 meeting after opposing the "In God We Trust" sign, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch reported.
 
"The right to disagree with public officials without retribution is at the heart of a thriving democracy," the civil liberties group said in a statement. "Just because a public official does not like what someone says about his decision it does not give him the right to intimidate someone or censor constitutionally protected speech."
 
Hunt posted a video of her confrontation with the council. It shows a police officer asking her to leave. City officials denied she was removed because of her opinions, claiming instead that she exceeded her speaking-time limits and was being disruptive.
 
'IN GOD WE TRUST' SIGN GETS LOUD SUPPORT AMID OUTSIDERS' OPPOSITION
 
The "In God We Trust" motto display has been on the council dais since November, but Hunt -- who lives about 27 miles away from Wentzville -- contends it doesn't belong there.
 
in god we trust sign pic Twitter
 
The display of "In God We Trust" motto on the Wentzville council podium sparked protests from anti-religion groups.  (Twitter)
 
"It's offensive to a lot of people. I'm outspoken about it but there are a lot of people like me that are afraid to speak out publicly," Hunt said at the meeting, according to KMOV-TV. "It says 'In God We Trust' when it should say 'In God some of us trust."
 
Wentzville Mayor Nick Guccione said at the council meeting that before the sign - paid for by private funds - was put on display, he consulted with legal expert and the city's board voted in favor of posting it. 
 
At a rally last month, hundreds of supporters seemed to agree.
 
"The overwhelming majority is in support of what we've done," he said. "I don't understand why it is offensive, but you can't please everybody. I will not take it down. I will stand strong on it. I do believe it's our national motto and it promotes patriotism."
 
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