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American Arrested For Spying...On What?

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#1 Zharkov

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Posted 31 December 2018 - 04:23 PM


This story leaves out most of THE DETAILS!   
What was our spy doing when he was caught?  

What information did he want"
What was his objective?  

Where exactly was he caught in Russia?
What spy equipment did he possess?    
Was he an official US embassy worker?
Which spy agency does he work for?
What documents were in his possession?
What kind of visa did he have?
Was he traveling on a US Diplomatic Passport?
Is he a foreign service officer?




 By Anatoly Kurmanaev
Updated Dec. 31, 2018 9:09 a.m. ET

MOSCOW—Russian authorities said Monday they had detained a U.S. citizen for alleged spying, setting the tone for more confrontation between the two countries in the new year.

American Paul Whelan was arrested on Dec. 28 while “carrying out spying activities,” Russian security agency the FSB said in a brief statement without providing further details.

Russia’s Foreign Ministry told state media it had informed the U.S. embassy about the arrest. The U.S. embassy in Moscow and the State Department didn’t immediately respond to request for comment.

Mr. Whelan could face up to 20 years in jail if he is convicted of spying.

“The law of retaliation states, ‘An eye for an eye or a tooth for a tooth,’” Russian President Vladimir Putintold reporters earlier this month when asked how his government would respond to politically-motivated arrests. “But we will not arrest innocent people simply to exchange them for someone else later on.”

In a New Year message to President Donald Trump sent last week, Mr. Putin said Russia is open to dialogue “on the most wide-ranging agenda” with the U.S.

In the last four years, Russia has met U.S. sanctions and tariffs with its own countermeasures which have either banned or raised the cost of selected Western imports entering Russia.

Last week, Russian websites published the personal details of the British Broadcasting Corporation’s entire Moscow bureau. That disclosure came days after a British newspaper printed the names and photographs of some of Russian state media journalists working in the country. The BBC has said only Russian authorities possessed that information.

“The key thing to watch now is how Washington reacts,” Sam Greene, Director of the Russia Institute at King’s College London wrote on Twitter. “Will Trump push back hard, as previous presidents have? Or will he...throw Whelan under the bus?”

Write to Anatoly Kurmanaev at Anatoly.kurmanaev@wsj.com


https://www.wsj.com/...rge-11546255397

 

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

 

Someone should write that journalist to tell him he needs to ask a few questions about the story.

 


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#2 Zharkov

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Posted 31 December 2018 - 04:29 PM

Just because the  FSB didn't release any details doesn't mean that a journalist shouldn't ask for more!

 

A tough journalist will continue demanding details until the authorities threaten to arrest him.   If he gets to that point, he's done enough.

 

Really disappointing story - one gets the impression that a journalist has to be neutered to get that job.   How about some push back?

 

Go to Moscow's FSB headquarters and bug the Hell out of them for the details!   Get the whole story!

 

Why keep the spy's activities secret?   The US spy agency, if any sent him, already knows what it wanted from the spy.

 

So why not tell everyone else?    It's not that big a secret anymore.


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#3 Zharkov

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Posted 31 December 2018 - 04:32 PM

Shame on the spy agency that sent him to Russia, if any did.  

 

There is only one big rule in spying - DON'T GET CAUGHT!

 

If a spy is caught, one may infer that his training was inadequate for the job.

 

And that's not the spy's fault, that's the fault of his superiors.

 

bq-5c292668934e3.jpeg


Edited by Zharkov, 31 December 2018 - 06:34 PM.

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#4 wirehaired

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Posted 01 January 2019 - 01:34 PM

Could be a SPY, but maybe Russia is playing the game the Americans seem to have invented,kidnap Russians and Chinese on bullshit charges sometimes from third Countries. 


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#5 Zharkov

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Posted 01 January 2019 - 03:33 PM

It could be that someone wants one of their spies returned, and needs some spy trading to be done.

But the lack of specific details is highly suspicious.  

It could be that the guy wasn't a spy at all, which would mean the details would prove him innocent.


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#6 Zharkov

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Posted 02 January 2019 - 03:57 PM

Putin knows better - the spy was trying to steal the formula for wedding cake, a state secret in Russia.
Was he sent to Russia in retaliation for Russian spies stealing a US secret of Rock & Roll music, the Guitar?

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

An American man held in Russia on espionage charges is an innocent retired Marine who was in Moscow for a wedding, his family said Tuesday.

“We are deeply concerned for his safety and well-being,” the family of Paul Whelan said in a statement posted to Twitter Tuesday. “His innocence is undoubted and we trust that his rights will be respected.”

Whelan, 48, was detained for three days before his arrest Friday on spying charges that carry a prison sentence of up to 20 years.

The last time the family heard from Whelan was Dec. 28, the night before the wedding he was going to attend.

His twin brother, David Whelan, who posted the family’s statement, told The Guardian his sibling was set to attend the nuptials of a fellow former Marine, who was marrying a Russian woman.

The wedding party was staying at the Metropol hotel in Moscow.

“This visit was entirely for pleasure, from what I understand,” David said.

Whelan has been to Russia “numerous times,” as far back as 2007 to visit and for his work at Kelly Services, a management consulting company, his brother said.

He has a limited knowledge of Russian “other than to be able to get around,” David said.

Whelan currently works on a corporate security team for Michigan-based automotive company Borg Warner, his brother added.

In a statement, the State Department said Russia’s foreign ministry had notified them about the arrest of a US citizen, adding that they were pushing for consular access.

They didn’t identify Whelan or provide details about the case, citing “privacy considerations.”

The family said they’ve been in touch with congressional representatives, the US Embassy and the State Department.

“We are hoping he will be able to return home soon,” the family said.

https://nypost.com/2...ng-family-says/

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

In Russia, 20 years is "soon".


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#7 Zharkov

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Posted 02 January 2019 - 03:59 PM

After 20 years in a Russian gulag, Mr. Whelan will speak Russian like a native, so it's not all bad news.


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#8 Zharkov

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Posted 02 January 2019 - 04:04 PM

It's always safer to marry a Russian in Camaroon or Ethiopia where the prison guards can be bribed with smaller sums.   Moscow is too expensive.


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#9 Zharkov

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Posted 02 January 2019 - 10:44 PM

Arrested for insulting CNN?

A CNN anchor asked the brother of a detained American about his anti-CNN social media posts in an interview Wednesday morning.

Forty-eight-year-old Michigan businessman and ex-Marine, Paul Whelan, was detained in Russia this week on charges of espionage. CNN’s Alisyn Camerota interviewed David Whelan, who is the brother of Paul. Camerota used the opportunity to grill Whelan about his brother’s anti-CNN social media posts.

Camerota asked Whelan about posts his brother made on a Russian social media platform, where he called CNN “fake news.”

(RELATED: CNN’s Randi Kaye Does Champagne Bong On New Year’s Eve Broadcast)

“There are some strange elements of your brother’s story,” Camerota said, describing a social media post where Paul Whelan was drinking coffee and watching CNN with the caption, “Just drinking coffee and watching fake news.”

https://dailycaller....ained-american/

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

 

Insulting CNN news service should be a mitigating factor that earns him an early release from prison.


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#10 Zharkov

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Posted 03 January 2019 - 04:48 PM

It's difficult to know what happened when the Russian government isn't telling the whole story.

 

So what is the whole story?   That this alleged "spy" was in the wrong place at the wrong time?

 

Was he trying to steal seduction secrets of Russian women?

 

What's the crime?    Is one being created for this purpose?

 

How about this, charge him with visiting Moscow without proper winter clothing?

 

Maybe stealing snowflakes?

 

Exhaling excessive carbon dioxide?


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#11 Zharkov

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Posted 03 January 2019 - 11:30 PM

FSB SETUP?   Sure has that odor!

 

The former US marine detained in Moscow has been charged with spying and faces 20 years if convicted, according to the Interfax news agency.

Paul Whelan, who is head of global security for a Michigan-based car parts supplier, is being held in the Lefortovo detention facility, a former KGB prison in the Russian capital.

Whelan’s lawyer, Vladimir Zherebenkov, declined to comment on the charges but said that under the terms of the arrest order, Whelan was expected to remain in custody in Moscow until at least 28 February.

“I consider his detention and arrest baseless. It’s based on investigators’ supposition that he will hinder the investigation process. We are asking for bail instead,” Zherebenkov told Reuters.

On Thursday, a Russian news outlet claimed Whelan was arrested just minutes after receiving a USB drive that contained the names of people employed at a top secret state organisation.

Citing a security service source, Rosbalt news agency said the 48-year-old American received the USB drive from a Russian citizen who visited him in his room at the Metropol hotel in Moscow on Friday. Officers from the FSB intelligence agency then reportedly burst into the room and arrested Whelan. The information could not be independently verified by the Guardian. Rosbalt did not say what had happened to the Russian citizen.

The news agency said that according to its source Whelan began making contact with potential Russian informants on internet forums and chatrooms about 10 years ago. He would then, the source said, meet up with his online acquaintances individually in Moscow “over a bottle”.

“The US citizen tried to determine if his acquaintance possessed information that could be of interest to American intelligence services, or if anyone in his close circles had access to such information,” read the Rosbalt report. The news agency often cites unnamed security service sources in its articles.

Whelan’s brother, David, told the Guardian: “We have not had any details from the state department about the circumstances of Paul’s arrest.”

A social media page apparently belonging to Paul Whelan on VK, or VKontakte, the Russian version of Facebook, contains at least one clear reference to a visit to Moscow, as well as a number of short Russian-language messages such as “Happy Victory Day” and “Forward, President Trump”. In one photograph, he is wearing a Spartak Moscow football top. The pinned message at the top of his VK page reads: “Next stop, Moscow … ”

Whelan has 59 friends on his VK page, including some former students at the Military University of the Ministry of Defence of the Russian Federation in Moscow.

One of his VK “friends” said he had first been in touch with Whelan more than a decade ago, when the two exchanged contacts on a now defunct pen pals website.

“When he visited Russia in 2008, I met him in person, we had a brief sightseeing tour of my city. I haven’t seen him since then,” the VK friend said, speaking on condition of anonymity. “This time I was not aware that he was in Russia until I sent him my Christmas greetings on the 25th, and he responded saying that he’s in Moscow, and that he plans to go to St Petersburg next.”

Zherebenkov said his client was holding up well and had a good sense of humour.

The US ambassador to Russia, Jon Huntsman, visited Whelan in prison on Wednesday, a move described as “a rookie mistake” by one Russian foreign policy analyst.

“He should have sent a career consular officer,” said Vladimir Frolov. “An ambassadorial visit by a political appointee escalates the situation and raises the stakes, makes it harder to resolve the situation.”

Huntsman has been US ambassador to Russia since October 2017.

A state department spokesperson said: “Ambassador Huntsman expressed his support for Mr Whelan and offered the embassy’s assistance. Ambassador Huntsman subsequently spoke by telephone with Mr Whelan’s family. Due to privacy considerations for Mr Whelan and his family, we have nothing further at this time.”

 

https://www.theguard...kup-paul-whelan

 

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

 

I smell a KGB-style setup - hand off "the secret" files, then immediately arrest the sucker who stupidly accepted them without suspecting it was a trap or set-up to get him into custody.

 

They do that in third world countries - hand some slow-witted tourist a wrapped package then police swarm him for an arrest for narcotics possession.

 

So whose names were on the USB drive?  

A list of janitors at the Kremlin?

Putin's former girl friends?

A Moscow telephone directory?


Edited by Zharkov, 03 January 2019 - 11:36 PM.

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#12 Zharkov

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Posted 03 January 2019 - 11:33 PM

Would that "Russian News Outlet" just by coincidence happen to be owned by the Russian government?

 

Hmm?


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#13 Zharkov

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Posted 03 January 2019 - 11:35 PM

If that is the best spy FSB could find on short notice, Putin should reduce their salaries.


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#14 Zharkov

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Posted 03 January 2019 - 11:38 PM

Imagine Trump saying, "Find me a Russian and stick some W88 warhead blueprints in her hand before you arrest her.

"And make sure she isn't ugly".


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#15 Zharkov

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Posted 04 January 2019 - 12:13 AM

So let's say you check into a classy hotel in Moscow, and the management, or a friend, welcomes you, offering a USB drive as a small token gift.

 

Should you expect it to be a police trap set to get your arrest and extort money for your release?

 

Depends on which country you are in.   If it's Russia, well......................................................?

 

What if that Moscow acquaintance offers you a ride?

 


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#16 Zharkov

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Posted 04 January 2019 - 12:17 AM

Interesting on how the FSB/KGB manages to confirm all of the horrible stereotypes in people's minds about Russia.  


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#17 Zharkov

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Posted 04 January 2019 - 12:25 AM

Et Tu, FSB?

 

In most cases, U.S. citizens only become aware of the exit ban when they attempt to depart China, and there is no method to find out how long the ban may continue. U.S. citizens under exit bans have been harassed and threatened.

https://travel.state...l-advisory.html
 


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#18 wirehaired

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Posted 04 January 2019 - 02:12 PM

Imagine Trump saying, "Find me a Russian and stick some W88 warhead blueprints in her hand before you arrest her.

"And make sure she isn't ugly".

I don't know if this guy is a Spy or not,maybe not,but I wouldn't blame the Russians for playing the game the US started some time ago,turns out the Man is also a British passport holder,we had the British Government today demanding access to him,if I was Russia I would say you can have access when we have access to the Skripals.


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#19 Zharkov

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Posted 04 January 2019 - 04:44 PM

Multiple passports may have a reason other than spying, but it is one red flag that one could be a spy.

 

The real issues are who is on the list on the USB drive and who requested it be delivered to the alleged "spy".

 

Russian prosecutors will have to name the people on the list and prove they are top secret names, and also prove that the accused "spy" had asked for the list.   If the list was just handed to him without him asking for it, there is no crime on his part.   The criminal would be the person who prepared the list.


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#20 Zharkov

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Posted 04 January 2019 - 04:46 PM

If FSB agents prepared the list of secret names, then the FSB agents would be guilty of entrapment and possibly attempted espionage.


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