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The Rich Kids Of Communism

Scientific Socialism Sucks

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#1 Zharkov

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Posted 06 January 2019 - 03:04 AM

From each, according to our need, to each according to our greed....

 

Rich kid of Communism: Fidel Castro's model grandson flashes his wealth and love of the high life on Instagram as he travels the world

  • Tony Castro flashed his family's wealth with a bevy of photos on social media
  • South Florida-based media outlets covering the Cuban community revealed the  images this week before the island's 60th anniversary of the Cuban Revolution
  • Castro shared pictures of his trips to Barcelona and Spain, and also Mexico, which he visited twice in 2018 during consecutive months
  • Castro's once-public Instagram account in now private. He has about 1,000 followers who can still see his posts

https://www.dailymai...-vacations.html

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

 

Vomiting in the streets and developing a taste for Irn Bru: The great-grandson of Joseph Stalin describes his time as an art student in Glasgow

  • Stalin persecuted artists during his rule of the Soviet Union from 1922-1953 
  • Jacob Dzhugashvili, son of Stalin's grandson Yevgeny, grew up in Georgia
  • He studied art in Glasgow in the 90s where he kept his family history a secret

By Sarah Ward For Mailonline

 

Joseph Stalin's great grandson Jacob Dzhugashvili in his graduation photo from the Glasgow School of Art

With their lurid symbolism and dreamy psychedelic tones, these works are by the hand of one of the Glasgow School of Art’s more unlikely graduates.

 

Jacob Dzhugashvili hoped simply to make his name as a painter, yet he could not get away from his family roots.

For he is the great-grandson of the Soviet Union’s arch-persecutor of artists - Iosif Vissarionovich Dzhugashvili, better known as Joseph Stalin.

 

He spent his time at the famous art school partying with fellow students at the height of 1990s Britpop and even - to his eternal shame - became so drunk on one occasion that he threw up on one of the city’s main thoroughfares.

But he could not escape being saddled with one of the most difficult legacies of the modern age.

 

Recalling his time in Glasgow, Mr Dzhugashvili, 45, now a successful painter whose work is sold by a top London gallery, admitted that he had preferred to keep his extraordinary political heritage a secret during his studies, revealing the truth only to a select few close friends.

 

He said that people reacted ‘differently, always differently’ to his family background, adding: ‘Some curious. Some with hate. Some with great respect.’

 

https://www.dailymai...nt-Glasgow.html


Edited by Zharkov, 06 January 2019 - 03:06 AM.

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#2 wirehaired

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Posted 06 January 2019 - 03:47 PM

Whatever he got drunk on it wasn't Iron Bru,that was a soft drink no longer produced I believe.


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#3 Zharkov

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Posted 07 January 2019 - 10:59 PM

Cuba was to be "the purest form of communism", the model for other communist countries.

 

So how did Fidel's grandson get a billion dollars, without a job, in a country where everyone was "equal" by law?

 

It's one of many huge flaws of communism - political leaders become rich while nobody else can do that.

 

Under capitalism, anyone has a chance to become rich if they do it through brilliant ideas and hard work.

 

Under communism, not a chance unless you are the son or grandson of the leader.

 

China is another example.   Industry leaders there are highly respected leaders of the communist party, so their kids drive Ferrarri cars, and Bugatti, at a half million dollars or more each.   Chinese leaders are fabulously rich, making communist doctrine more of a parody than a fact, but their system remains deadly for dissenters.

 

Socialism is a dirty joke on the workers.   They work an entire lifetime for the state and receive a meager pension that barely buys a loaf of bread, while the children of party officials join the jet set, partying around the world like rock stars.


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#4 Zharkov

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Posted 07 January 2019 - 11:03 PM

State socialism is a raised middle finger from the government to the workers.


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#5 Hellboy

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Posted 08 January 2019 - 04:08 AM

but they said Cuba has more healthy people than Dominican Republic or Haiti.

 

 

..


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#6 Bruce M Cow

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Posted 08 January 2019 - 05:52 AM

Add jews into any system and it goes bad.The international Mafia ends up with all the money by corrupting everything .Jews must never be allowed to control the money.Control the Media ,control the courts, control the schools,Jews just need to be separated from people.


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#7 Bruce M Cow

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Posted 08 January 2019 - 05:54 AM

Castro was just another Jew.


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#8 Zharkov

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Posted 09 January 2019 - 02:56 PM

Richard Nixon gave an address titled “The Meaning of Communism to Americans,” Aug. 21, 1960:

 

“The major problem confronting the people of the United States … is … communism. … The test is one not so much of arms but of faith. … Communism denies God, enslaves men, and destroys justice. … The appeal of the Communist idea is not to the masses … but … to an intelligent minority. … It has failed in its promise of equality in abundance. … It has produced … disillusionment and a steady stream of men, women, and children seeking to escape its blight. … Communism is a false idea. …”

 

Nixon gave communism’s view on capitalism: “Communism inevitably supplants and destroys capitalism … free trade, free selling and buying. … The Soviet Union … started by attempting to root out … every vestige of the market principle. … Production and distribution of goods were put under central direction. … It was a catastrophic failure … in appalling shortages of the most elementary necessities. … Communist theory … says nothing about how the economy shall be run except that it shall not be by the market principle.”

 

Nixon added regarding truth: “Communism starts with the proposition that there are no universal truths or general truths of human nature. … The high priest of this doctrine was Eugene Pashukanis. His reign came to an abrupt end. … With an irony befitting the career of one who predicted that communism would bring an end to law and legal processes, Pashukanis was quietly taken off and shot without even the semblance of a trial. …”

 

Nixon commented on Communist elections: “Voters are in the end permitted only to vote for the candidates chosen by the only political party permitted to exist … the electorate is given no choice. … Knowing that it cannot achieve representative democracy, it seems to feel better if it adopts its empty forms. … ”

 

Nixon continued on power: “Throughout the ages, among men of all nations and creeds, law has generally been thought of as a curb on arbitrary power. It has been conceived as a way of substituting reason for force. … Law in the Soviet Union is not conceived as a check on power, it is openly and proudly an expression of power. In this conception … the bankruptcy of communism as a moral philosophy openly declares itself. …”

 

Nixon added regarding freedom: “Communist philosophy is basically inconsistent with the ideal of freedom because it denies that there can be any standard of moral truth by which the actions of any given social order may be judged. … If the individual says to government, ‘Thus far may you go, but no farther,’ he necessarily appeals to some principle of rightness that stands above his particular form of government. It is precisely the possibility of any such standard that communism radically … denies.

 

Marx and Engels had nothing but sneers for the idea that there are ‘eternal truths, such as freedom, justice, etc., that are common to all states of society.’ They contend that there are no eternal truths. … If that system requires tyranny and oppression, then tyranny and oppression must within that system be accepted; there can be no higher court of appeal. … A sense of freedom can never develop under the Soviet regime.

 

Despite communism’s promises, the statistics reveal that more people have been killed under atheistic communist regimes – estimated at over 150 million – than any other system, except fundamental Islam, estimated at over 270 million and counting.

 

Nixon continued: “Communism has appeared as a kind of nightmare. … Communist faith … tells men to forget all the teachings of the ages about government, law, and morality. … There is only one rule: Smash the existing ‘bourgeois’ economic and legal order and leave the rest to the ‘spontaneous class organization of the proletariat (working class)’.”

 

Nixon’s warning echoed an editorial cartoon appearing in the Chicago Tribune, April 21, 1934, depicting a communist writing on a large board: “Plan of Action for U.S. – SPEND! SPEND! SPEND! under the guise of recovery – BUST the government – BLAME the capitalists for the failure – JUNK the constitution and DECLARE A DICTATORSHIP.” To the side, it added: “It worked in Russia!

 

Many are concerned because Congress continually votes to increase the U.S. national debt, which has mushroomed to more than $20 trillion. CNSNews.com published the article “Obama Has Now Increased Debt More than All Presidents from George Washington Through George H.W. Bush Combined” (writer Terence P. Jeffrey, October 5, 2011).

 

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

 

Today we see the results of communism in Venezuela, North Korea, among other places experimenting with having a ruling class that accumulates the wealth of the people.   Their grandchildren will spend that money in luxurious excesses that can only leave socialists confused and wondering, "Where's the equality?".


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#9 Zharkov

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Posted 09 January 2019 - 03:17 PM

To the annoyance of liberal academia, in practice, every communist country ends up being run by a dictator, ie., Mao Zedong, Stalin, Pol Pot, Ho Chi Min, Kim Jong-il, Castro, Ceausescu, Tito, etc.

 

Franklin Roosevelt stated Feb. 10, 1940: “The Soviet Union … is run by a dictatorship as absolute as any other dictatorship in the world.”

 

Though proclaiming appealing ideals of a classless society, in practice, “communist Party members” become “the new royalty,” living in special neighborhoods with special shops and getting special treatment before the law. They exist to enforce the dictator’s will. If they are suspected of opposing the dictator, they suspiciously disappear.

“Citizens” in communist countries are equivalent to subjects, peasants and serfs, with their fate dictated by the dictator and his enforcers. Controlled media and rigged elections insure the dictator stays in power. Naive students are taught that in communist countries, everybody owns everything equally – “From each according to his ability, to each according to his needs” (a slogan popularized by Karl Marx in Critique of the Gotha Program, 1875).

 

But does this ever happen?

 

Only one question needs to be asked: “Who gets to live in the nice house and who lives in the dumpy house?”

 

The answer is: “Someone in the government dictates those things.” Well, whoever ultimately dictates those things is the dictator.

 

In practice, Communism is nothing more than a monarchy makeover – a top-down system of government where one supreme leader forces his will on the others. To stay in power, Stalin conducted purges and orchestrated famines, resulting in an estimated 40 million deaths.

 

https://www.wnd.com/...?cat_orig=faith


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#10 Hellboy

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Posted 09 January 2019 - 07:44 PM

Kazakhstan is ruled like communism.

 

Ukraine isn't.

 

Kazakhstan is getting richer, because the guy that rules the place reinvests ALL the money back into the country.

 

Ukraine is going bankrupt, because the rich criminals take out all the money - to buy stuff in London for themselves.

 

I'd rather live in Kazakhstan.

 

baiterek-kazakhstan-ludwig_.jpg

kazakhstan communism?

 

1513876960-2559.jpg

 

ukraine capitalism?


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#11 Zharkov

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Posted 10 January 2019 - 02:49 AM

One exception does not change the trend.

Most communist states have been a disaster for workers.
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#12 Zharkov

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Posted 11 January 2019 - 03:22 PM

Scraping to survive: Cubans forced to defy government to eke out existence

 

By Robert Dominguez
| New York Daily News |

HAVANA — This is definitely not what Fidel pictured.

Sixty years after Castro overthrew Cuba’s notoriously corrupt dictator Fulgencio Batista, one of the world’s last remaining Communist strongholds has become a hotbed of capitalism.

In Havana, where crumbling Colonial-era buildings stand in near-ruin alongside shiny new hotels and restaurants owned by private citizens — and where American cars from the 1950s are now tourist taxis that use the Plaza de la Revolución as a parking lot — long-suffering Cubans have been forced to become crafty capitalists in order to survive under the Socialist state’s eternally ineffective economy.

Here, in the second of a two-part series, the Daily News takes a look at a cross-section of Havana residents — an illegal taxi driver, an unlicensed street vendor, a fortune teller and a young prostitute among them — who are doing whatever it takes to make ends meet in modern-day Cuba.

‘I refuse to pay’

It’s lunchtime on a sunny day on La Rampa, Havana’s busiest street in the city’s Vedado district, and Frank is doing brisk business selling his homemade pastries to Cubans looking for a cheap, sweet dessert.

Sitting on a low wall outside an office building with an open cardboard box on his lap, Frank, 48, offers hungry Habaneros a 2-x-4-inch custom concoction made with dried fruit topped with custard icing for five Cuban pesos, or about 20 cents.

Frank, who bakes the pastries at home with the help of a friend, says he can sell anywhere from 50 to 75 pastries on a good day — $10 to $15, not a bad haul by Cuba’s standards.

“There are good days and bad days, but I make a decent living, so I’m out here every day,” says Frank, who lives with his elderly mother.

Like any small independent businessman, he worries about the means of production, especially under an economy known for constant shortages, not to mention quality control.

Flour for baking is currently in short supply, and the kind available on the black market makes his pastries too crumbly.

“People don’t like it as much,” he says.

Like other self-employed entrepreneurs working without a license, Frank also has to constantly deal with state inspectors looking to crack down on street vendors.

Though he does have a unique way of avoiding fines.

“They know me, and they know I refuse to pay,” he says. “So they usually don’t bother me.”
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One hacked-off cabbie

He doesn’t sport Travis Bickle’s Mohawk, green army jacket or arsenal of handguns. But get Miguel talking about conditions in Cuba, and it’s obvious he’s one ticked-off taxi driver.

The thirtysomething Havana native, who doesn’t have a license to use his car as a taxi, makes a living proudly defying the state’s strict controls on the industry, which he calls ridiculous, corrupt and just another way to steal more money from the people.

“Why should I give (the government) anything more than I have to?” he tells a foreign fare in the back seat of his car while driving along Havana’s narrow streets. “Life here is hard enough.”

With Havana’s bus service notoriously undependable, many Cuban commuters opt for inexpensive, privately-owned licensed taxis to get around town called almendrones, in which they share rides with strangers for about 50 cents.

Tourists usually see the sights in state-run yellow cabs or the ubiquitous, classic American cars from the ’50s that can cost up $50 an hour.

Drivers like Miguel, who owns a mid-1980s Russian Lada left over from when Cuba was a Soviet satellite, provide a cheaper option. Hanging around near the hotels, they’ll mostly ferry tourists — which is illegal without a license and can cost him a hefty $40 fine, or about a month-and-a-half’s salary for the average Cuban.

But driving what is essentially a Havana-style gypsy cab lets Miguel avoid paying license fees and taxes — as well as having to buy expensive fuel at state-owned gas stations, like licensed hacks are supposed to do.

Gasoline has long been one of the more popular commodities sold on the black market. But government workers who drive official vehicles like trucks, buses or even ambulances have long made money on the side by stealing gas from their allocated quotas and selling it to taxi drivers, licensed or not, and private car owners.

Besides, being his own boss is a way of sticking it to a government Miguel says is as crooked as any black marketeer.

“What I don’t understand is how we have let these people stay in power,” he says, his voice rising. “We are 11 million and we cannot defeat a few hundred?”

All in the family

She didn’t see it coming, but Teresita Rios is ready to take over the family fortune-telling business.

Rios and her mother, Juana Rios, have been fixtures at the Plaza de la Catedral in the historic Old Havana section of the capital city for years, reading Tarot cards for tourists at an outdoor table and posing for kitschy pictures holding super-sized cigars.

Dressed in traditional white Santeria gowns and headdresses, Teresita and Juana are state-sanctioned street performers who have become as much of a stereotypical symbol of Cuban culture as the ‘50s-era Chevys that still rumble around the city.

Not that they’re complaining. Each reading, during which Teresita or Juana invariably impart a feel-good forecast for a subject’s health, wealth or love life, earns them at least $10, which can multiply quickly when the Colonial-era plaza buzzes with tourists.

“I always try to help people and transmit positive energy,” says Teresita, a 52-year-old mother of three who professes psychic powers. “I help them see that all is possible if they believe in themselves.”

What she didn’t foresee was that her 78-year-old mother, known as Juana la Cubana, would get sick early last year after working at the plaza for the past 32 years, leaving Teresita to go it alone for now.

“My mother is a historic figure and it’s possible she may not come back,” says Teresita, who started working with Juana 10 years ago. “I can’t be like her, but I am hoping we can continue.”

Taking it to an art form

When boyhood pals Mario Echevarria and Nelson Labrada decided to leave steady jobs in construction in their hometown of Holguin and move more than 400 miles away to start over in Havana, their families thought they were making a mistake.

Nobody, everyone said, should put much faith in the Cuban economy. Especially when both men were in their early 40s.

But when the friends said their plan was to become professional artists, everyone just thought they were crazy.

Three years later, it looks like Echevarria and Labrada got the last laugh.

The men, who had worked at a variety of jobs including as carpenters and locksmiths, had always been talented artists. They were lucky to move to Havana just as the tourist boom, helped by the normalization of relations with the U.S. under former President Barack Obama, hit the city like a Caribbean storm.

Suddenly, the paintings they sold from the tiny room they rented by day — an eating area in a cramped apartment overlooking a narrow street in Old Havana — were in hot demand by tourists looking for a relatively inexpensive piece of authentic Cuban art.

“People like it,” says Labrada, 45, of their artwork, which is mostly colorful, clichéd images of classic cars, rural vistas and scenes along the Malecón, Havana’s famed seawall.

The paintings, all on soft canvas and some done with small metal palettes rather than brushes, come in various sizes and sell for $10 to $200.

“After we pay for rent, taxes, our pensions and licenses, we are able to make a decent living,” says Echevarria, 48.

But the artists do face some risks. Good art materials are in short supply in Cuba, especially oil and acrylic paints, and the men refuse to lower their standards and use house paint like some other artists do.

Then there’s the cyclical dearth of customers — tourism tends to drag during the summer months and the early fall.

“We were able to save a little money for a while, but right now it’s a little tough,” Echevarria says. “We’re waiting for things to pick up with the tourists,” he adds. “Cubans, unfortunately, don’t buy art.”

Turning tricks her only option

With her bleached blond hair, tight stylish jeans and cell phone jammed in her rear pocket, she could be a student, an officer worker or just one of the many seemingly careless teens ambling along the Malecón on a hot Havana afternoon.

Except Lara represents Cuba’s dirty little secret. Decades after Castro vowed to stamp out the rampant prostitution of the bad old Batista days when Havana was America’s adults-only playground, the world’s oldest profession is still going strong.

While streetwalkers are rare in Havana, or at least not out in the open, Lara is what’s known as a jinitera – women young and old, single and married, who sell their bodies for a quick buck just to survive in Cuba’s harsh economy.

Or in some cases, lucky enough to latch onto a randy tourist for the duration of his stay and enjoy gifts, free meals and cash in exchange for the jinitera’s company.

“I feel like I’ve been doing this my whole life,” says Lara, who says she’s 18. “I do it because there’s nothing else I can do. I didn’t go to school and I don’t have a job, so this is it.”

Lara, who blames an alcoholic mother and an absent father for drifting into the life, says she makes up to $50 for a quick trick, usually tourists she solicits along the Malecón.

She’ll take the client back to the small room she rents from a woman who Lara says is fine with how she makes a living.

“A lot of my friends do this,” she says in a soft voice.

Most nights, Lara will troll Havana’s many discos and clubs for tourists looking for a good time, who she can hopefully charge a lot more for overnight stays.

With a world-weariness that belies her age, she’s resigned to the fact that despite the harsh penalties for prostitutes — prison terms are not uncommon — she sees no way out right now.

“This is Cuba,” she says quietly. “You do what you can.”

 

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

 

As the typical pattern, this same story could be written about Venezuela.

Socialism impoverishes the masses while simultaneously promising them a better life.

The better life begins to happen when people turn capitalist and compete for business.

It works that way - every time.


 


Edited by Zharkov, 11 January 2019 - 03:25 PM.

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#13 RobertD

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Posted 12 January 2019 - 01:23 PM

The only law: The perfect law of liberty.
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#14 Zharkov

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Posted 15 January 2019 - 04:33 PM

bq-5c3cebe34a705.jpeg


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#15 Zharkov

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Posted 17 January 2019 - 01:32 AM

bq-5c3e8af9d8bff.jpeg

 

Google:  Nancy Pelosi's connections to Communism.


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