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Russian Colonel Who Averted Nuclear War Receives World Citizen Award


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#1 CHORNYVOLK

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Posted 20 January 2006 - 01:36 PM

Russian Colonel Who Averted Nuclear War Receives World Citizen Award
Created: 20.01.2006 13:18 MSK (GMT +3), Updated: 13:18 MSK, 3 hours 16 minutes ago


MosNews


Retired Russian colonel Stanislav Petrov received a special World Citizen Award at a UN meeting in New York on Thursday. Petrov was honored as the
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#2 acdbrn666

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Posted 20 January 2006 - 01:39 PM

[QUOTE]Originally posted by CHORNYVOLK
Back in 1983 Petrov made a decision that prevented a war that could have destroyed the planet. He was the duty officer at Russia
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#3 eurasian

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Posted 20 January 2006 - 02:07 PM

The MAD Mutual Assured Destruction only existed as deterrent.

The response can always be flexible all the more Russia is so huge. The ZOG of the US will be buried by its lies and its crimes against humanity.

Terrorism = Communism = Clash of civilizations = Anti-sionism are inventions of the Zio-American industrial-military conglomerate, a warning to anybody to not question the current plutocratic oligarchic sionist elite.

An updated and upgraded Soviet Union would still exist if Gen. Petrov would have been a clever hawk in a time when Yuri Andropov was dying.

Post-communist Slav women would now not work as prostitutes, should Gen. Petrov have done his duty.
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#4 vigorous

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Posted 20 January 2006 - 02:28 PM

relying on his intuition, Petrov disobeyed


This reminds me of my friends'
and family's advices to me on
stopping the war on the US
Forest Circus.
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#5 Zharkov

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Posted 20 January 2006 - 05:06 PM

Petrov saved the world and deserves a much higher pension than $200 a month. He should receive three times that much or more. It's too bad the UN award doesn't come with a lifetime pension or a huge chunk of cash, like the Nobel Peace Prize which Petrov also deserves.

I see no reason why the UN could not nominate Petrov for the Nobel Peace Prize, because he sure did a lot more to earn it than anyone else did recently.
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#6 Zharkov

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Posted 20 January 2006 - 05:16 PM

Suppose all 190 nations had atomic warheads, missiles, and satellite detection systems?

With that many countries on edge, ready to launch at the first sign of trouble, humanity wouldn't survive very long. A good reason why little countries shouldn't have big missiles - the probability of human or instrumental error vastly increases.
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#7 ahmad

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Posted 20 January 2006 - 05:24 PM

It is indeed an interesting story. But playing the devil's advocate here for a moment, what if the launch was real? History would have reported the story quite differently, particularly from the Russian perspective.
My point is that his decision was a 50/50 crap shoot. However, military personnel, especially at that level, are supposed to follow orders, are they not? He was actually in violation of his duty, even though the outcome was highly favorable.

His pension is an embarassment to the Russian Government regardless of this story. In a country overloaded with natural resource wealth that was secured by their military during the last war, it's shameful.
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#8 ahmad

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Posted 20 January 2006 - 05:31 PM

I don't think he's a coward. In fact, he showed extraordinary bravery, knowing full well his career was probably over. But again as a soldier, his mission is to follow orders. A contradiction certainly in this case, but it could have gone the other way.
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#9 acdbrn666

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Posted 20 January 2006 - 05:44 PM

Originally posted by ahmad
I don't think he's a coward. In fact, he showed extraordinary bravery, knowing full well his career was probably over. But again as a soldier, his mission is to follow orders. A contradiction certainly in this case, but it could have gone the other way.



Just imagine if he had followed orders.
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#10 Rickk

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Posted 20 January 2006 - 06:10 PM

Originally posted by ahmad
It is indeed an interesting story. But playing the devil's advocate here for a moment, what if the launch was real? History would have reported the story quite differently, particularly from the Russian perspective.
My point is that his decision was a 50/50 crap shoot. However, military personnel, especially at that level, are supposed to follow orders, are they not? He was actually in violation of his duty, even though the outcome was highly favorable.

His pension is an embarassment to the Russian Government regardless of this story. In a country overloaded with natural resource wealth that was secured by their military during the last war, it's shameful.




I don't think it was so much a 'crap shoot' as it was common sense.

The rest I agree with.
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#11 bmj

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Posted 20 January 2006 - 06:31 PM

Who would order an attack with only five missiles? That big an idiot has not been born yet, not even in the U.S.
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#12 Zharkov

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Posted 20 January 2006 - 06:34 PM

I think Petrov WAS following orders because his orders required that he respond to an actual missile launch, not an instrument error.

As with any orders, one must be certain the conditions apply before the order is carried out. If the conditions are ambiguous and unclear, then doing nothing is also carrying out orders.

Regarding what should be the case, I think that a military order to annihilate an entire nation by counterattack, without regard to the size of the initiating attack, should be probably be an illegal order under international law as a use of excessive force would be in that situation.

I would like to see the concept of appropriate retaliation be employed by international law, so that if a nation launches a missile by accident, it doesn't result in total annihilation in response.
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#13 Zharkov

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Posted 20 January 2006 - 06:41 PM

Col. Petrov is a real hero because he risked his career and maybe his life to make the right decision.

He shouldn't have been criticised at all - if he had guessed wrong, there would have been plenty of time to retaliate because 5 missiles couldn't have disabled the entire Soviet Missile System.
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#14 Rickk

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Posted 20 January 2006 - 06:48 PM

Originally posted by Zharkov


I would like to see the concept of appropriate retaliation be employed by international law, so that if a nation launches a missile by accident, it doesn't result in total annihilation in response.






What has 'international law' touched that it hasn't effed up?
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#15 ahmad

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Posted 20 January 2006 - 06:50 PM

"But relying on his intuition, Petrov disobeyed"

"Col. Petrov is a real hero because he risked his career and maybe his life to make the right decision"

The Colonel didn't know it was the right decision. It was a SWAG (scientific wild-*** guess). He did in fact disobey orders. No one argues with the outcome but the reality is that he didn't have any information about the "launch" except that five missiles seemed odd.

As for international law, a sovereign country has the right, and responsibility, to set their own standards for a military action. That fact is recognized by international law. "Retaliation by international law" is a formula for disaster.
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#16 kreator

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Posted 20 January 2006 - 09:20 PM

Originally posted by acdbrn666
It would be interesting to see how many other times Soviet/Russian and American systems indicated false launches. I bet it's surprisingly high.




November 9, 1979: Computer Exercise Tape

At 8:50 a.m. on November 9, 1979, duty officers at 4 command centers (NORAD HQ, SAC Command Post, The Pentagon National Military Command Center, and the Alternate National Military Command Center) all saw on their displays a pattern showing a large number of Soviet Missiles in a full scale attack on the U.S.A. During the next 6 minutes emergency preparations for retaliation were made. A number of Air Force planes were launched, including the President's National Emergency Airborne Command Post, though without the President! The President had not been informed, perhaps because he could not be found.

No attempt was made to use the hot line either to ascertain the Soviet intentions or to tell the Soviets the reasons for U.S. actions. This seems to me to have been culpable negligence. The whole purpose of the "Hot Line" was to prevent exactly the type of disaster that was threatening at that moment.

With commendable speed, NORAD was able to contact PAVE PAWS early warning radar and learn that no missiles had been reported. Also, the sensors on the satellites were functioning that day and had detected no missiles. In only 6 minutes the threat assessment conference was terminated.

The reason for the false alarm was an exercise tape running on the computer system. U.S. Senator Charles Percy happened to be in NORAD HQ at the time and is reported to have said there was absolute panic. A question was asked in Congress. The General Accounting Office conducted an investigation, and an off-site testing facility was constructed so that test tapes did not in the future have to be run on a system that could be in military operation.

20 Mishaps That Might Have Started Accidental Nuclear War
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#17 Uragan

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Posted 20 January 2006 - 09:57 PM

Sunlight on clouds? Like Swamp gas and Weather balloons?:rolleyes:

Sounds like BS. Like there were explosions or fires at the site or an "accidental" launch.

Misnews at it with its BS too.
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#18 Nemesis

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Posted 20 January 2006 - 11:47 PM

Fortunately, there was a level-headed human making a decision based on his knowledge and instincts, instincts that were strong enough to give him the courage to disobey orders with all kinds of obvious consequences.
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#19 Nemesis

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Posted 20 January 2006 - 11:50 PM

BTW, someone mentioned the Nobel "Peace" Prize. It seems that prize RARELY goes to real men of peace.
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#20 Uragan

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Posted 21 January 2006 - 12:05 AM

He did not disobey orders, he was the one giving them.

It was his judgement whether what he saw was an accident or a nuclear attack, and obviously 5 fireballs would be too few for an attack on such a country as USSR.
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